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Mtbi concussion

Alessander Danna-Dos-Santos, Sambit Mohapatra, Maria Santos, Adriana M Degani
Understanding the long-term effects of concussive events remains a challenge for the development of modern medical practices and the prevention of recurrent traumas. In this study, we utilized indices of oculomotor performance and the ability to react to simple environmental stimuli to assess the long-term motor effects of traumatic brain injury in its mildest form (mTBI). We performed analysis of eye movement accuracy, investigated the presence of abnormal eye movements, and quantified time to react to simple environmental stimuli on long-term mTBI survivors...
March 15, 2018: Scientific Reports
Philip W Cameron, Noelle C Soltero, Justin Byers
Mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBIs) are common in contact sports. There is an association between mTBIs and altered motor function. BioSway technology measures individuals' balance using the Balance Error Scoring System (BESS). Prior to incorporating BESS testing in concussion protocol, other variables that influence the BESS test require review. The objective of this study is to determine if game fatigue in hockey players also influences the BESS score. 23 male (21.08 ± 1.09) National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) athletes were tested using the BioSway™ (Biodex, USA)...
2018: International Journal of Exercise Science
Douglas B Cooper, Glenn Curtiss, Patrick Armistead-Jehle, Heather G Belanger, David F Tate, Matthew Reid, Amy O Bowles, Carmen S Velez, Jan E Kennedy, Rodney D Vanderploeg
OBJECTIVE: To examine differences in objective neurocognitive performance and subjective cognitive symptoms in individuals with a history of a single concussion, multiple concussions, orthopedic injuries, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). METHOD: Participants included 116 military service members who sustained a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) during combat deployment. Subjects were subdivided into groups based on concussion frequency: a single concussion (n = 42), 2 concussions (n = 21), and 3 or more concussions (n = 53)...
March 2018: Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation
Arundhati Undurti, Elizabeth A Colasurdo, Carl L Sikkema, Jaclyn S Schultz, Elaine R Peskind, Kathleen F Pagulayan, Charles W Wilkinson
The most frequent injury sustained by US service members deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan is mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI), or concussion, by far most often caused by blast waves from improvised explosive devices or other explosive ordnance. TBI from all causes gives rise to chronic neuroendocrine disorders with an estimated prevalence of 25-50%. The current study expands upon our earlier finding that chronic pituitary gland dysfunction occurs with a similarly high frequency after blast-related concussions...
2018: Frontiers in Neurology
Rebecca Cooksley, Emma Maguire, Natasha A Lannin, Carolyn A Unsworth, Michelle Farquhar, Claire Galea, Biswadev Mitra, Julia Schmidt
BACKGROUND/AIM: Approximately, 80% of traumatic brain injuries are considered mild in severity. Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) may cause temporary or persisting impairments that can adversely affect an individual's ability to participate in daily occupations and life roles. This study aimed to identify symptoms, factors predicting level of symptoms and functional and psycho-social outcomes for participants with mTBI three months following injury. METHOD: Patients discharged from the Emergency Department of a major metropolitan hospital with a diagnosis of mTBI were contacted by telephone three months after injury...
March 2, 2018: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal
Nicola J Starkey, Kelly Jones, Rosalind Case, Alice Theadom, Suzanne Barker-Collo, Valery Feigin
OBJECTIVE: Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is common injury during childhood and adolescence but the long-term outcomes are poorly understood. This study examined post-concussive symptoms and behavioural outcomes in children and adolescents up to 24 months post-mTBI. METHOD: Parents of children aged 8-15 years with mTBI completed the BASC-2 and Rivermead Post-Concussion Symptoms Questionnaire at baseline, 1-, 6-, 12- and 24 months post-injury. An age-matched traumatic brain injury-free cohort was recruited and assessed at 12- and 24 months...
February 15, 2018: Brain Injury: [BI]
Cindy Hunt, Alicja Michalak, Donna Ouchterlony, Shawn Marshall, Cheryl Masanic, Chantal Vaidyanath, Shree Bhalerao, Michael D Cusimano, Deanna Quon, Lisa K Fischer, Andrew Baker
BACKGROUND: Standardized data collection for traumatic brain injury (TBI) (including concussion) using common data elements (CDEs) has strengthened clinical care and research capacity in the United States and Europe. Currently, Ontario healthcare providers do not collect uniform data on adult patients diagnosed with concussion. OBJECTIVE: The Ontario Concussion Care Strategy (OCCS) is a collaborative network of multidisciplinary healthcare providers, brain injury advocacy groups, patient representatives, and researchers with a shared vision to improve concussion care across the province, starting with the collection of standardized data...
November 2017: Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences. le Journal Canadien des Sciences Neurologiques
Deborah L Snell, Rachelle Martin, A D Macleod, Lois J Surgenor, Richard J Siegert, E Jean C Hay-Smith, Tracy Melzer, Gary J Hooper, Tim Anderson
OBJECTIVES: Post-concussion-like symptoms (PCS) are common in patients without a history of brain injury, such as those with chronic pain (CP). This exploratory study examined neuro-cognitive and psychological functioning in patients with PCS following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or CP, to assess unique and overlapping phenomenology. METHODS: In this case-control study, participants (n = 102) with chronic symptoms after mTBI (n = 45) were matched with mTBI recovered (n = 31) and CP groups (n = 26), on age, gender, ethnicity and education...
February 1, 2018: Brain Injury: [BI]
Benoit C Mouzon, Corbin Bachmeier, Joseph O Ojo, Christopher M Acker, Scott Ferguson, Daniel Paris, Ghania Ait-Ghezala, Gogce Crynen, Peter Davies, Michael Mullan, William Stewart, Fiona Crawford
Objective: Exposure to repetitive concussion, or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), has been linked with increased risk of long-term neurodegenerative changes, specifically chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). To date, preclinical studies largely have focused on the immediate aftermath of mTBI, with no literature on the lifelong consequences of mTBI in these models. This study provides the first account of lifelong neurobehavioral and histological consequences of repetitive mTBI providing unique insight into the constellation of evolving and ongoing pathologies with late survival...
January 2018: Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology
Lia Maria Hocke, Chris C Duszynski, Chantel T Debert, Diane Dleikan, Jeffrey F Dunn
Concussion, or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), accounts for approximately 80% of all traumatic brain injuries across North America. The majority of mTBI patients recover within days to weeks, however, 14-36% of the time acute mTBI symptoms persist for months or even years and develop into persistent post-concussion symptoms (PPCS). There is a need to find biomarkers in patients with PPCS, to improve prognostic ability and to provide insight into the pathophysiology underlying chronic symptoms. Recent research has pointed towards impaired network integrity and cortical communication as a biomarker...
January 26, 2018: Journal of Neurotrauma
Jonathan M Oliver, Anthony J Anzalone, Stephanie M Turner
Even in the presence of underreporting, sports-related concussions/mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI) are on the rise. In the absence of proper diagnosis, an athlete may return to play prior to full recovery, increasing the risk of second-impact syndrome or protracted symptoms. Recent evidence has demonstrated that sub-concussive impacts, those sustained routinely in practice and competition, result in a quantifiable pathophysiological response and the accumulation of both concussive and sub-concussive impacts sustained over a lifetime of sports participation may lead to long-term neurological impairments and an increased risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases...
January 24, 2018: Sports Medicine
Matthew Wade Reid, Douglas Cooper, Lisa H Lu, Grant L Iverson, Jan Kennedy
The objective of this study was to assess the associations between resilience, adversity, post-concussion symptoms, and posttraumatic stress symptom reporting following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). We hypothesized that resilience would be associated with less symptom reporting and adversity would be associated with greater symptom reporting. This was a cross-sectional study of retrospective data collected for an ongoing TBI repository. US military service members who screened positive for mTBI during a primary care visit completed the Trauma History Screen (THS), Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC), Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory (NSI), and PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version (PCL-C)...
January 22, 2018: Journal of Neurotrauma
Casey Swick, Tiffany Andersen, Ana-Mercedes Flores
Illuminating the pathophysiological mechanisms that underlie persistent post concussive symptoms following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a growing area of study. Alhourani et al. (J Neurophysiol 116: 1840-1847, 2016) added to this emerging body of literature with their study examining default mode network (DMN) disruption in mTBI using magnetoencephalography. The findings provided enhanced insight into the neural underpinnings of mTBI , which can be applied to future clinical and experimental research in this area...
January 3, 2018: Journal of Neurophysiology
Casey Swick, Tiffany Andersen, Ana-Mercedes Flores
Illuminating the pathophysiological mechanisms that underlie persistent post concussive symptoms following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a growing area of study. Alhourani et al. (J Neurophysiol 116: 1840-1847, 2016) added to this emerging body of literature with their study examining default mode network (DMN) disruption in mTBI using magnetoencephalography. The findings provided enhanced insight into the neural underpinnings of mTBI, which can be applied to future clinical and experimental research in this area...
January 10, 2018: Journal of Neurophysiology
Suzanne Barker-Collo, Alice Theadom, Nicola Starkey, Michael Kahan, Kelly Jones, Valery Feigin
BACKGROUND: We examined the factor structure of the Rivermead Post-Concussion Symptom Questionnaire (RPQ), the most commonly used measure of post-concussive symptoms, over the first year post-injury. METHOD: Factor analysis (orthogonal rotation) was used to examine the RPQ items that form coherent subsets/factors within 2-weeks, and 1, 6, and 12-months post-mTBI in 527 adults (age >16 years). RESULTS: At baseline, three factors accounted for 63...
January 22, 2018: Brain Injury: [BI]
Daphne Cloë Voormolen, Maryse C Cnossen, Suzanne Polinder, Nicole von Steinbuechel, Pieter E Vos, Juanita Antje Haagsma
Mild Traumatic Brian Injury (mTBI) is a common diagnosis and approximately one third of mTBI patients experience a variety of cognitive, emotional, psychosocial and behavioral post-concussion symptoms. When a cluster of these symptoms persists for more than three months they are often classified as post-concussion syndrome (PCS). The objective of this study was to determine prevalence rates, risk factors and functional outcome associated with PCS six months after mTBI applying divergent classification methods...
January 19, 2018: Journal of Neurotrauma
Catherine Quatman-Yates, Anna Bailes, Sara Constand, Mary Claire Sroka, Katharine Nissen, Brad Kurowski, Jason Hugentobler
OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to review the literature to identify and summarize strategies for evaluating responses to physical exertion after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) for clinical and research purposes. DATA SOURCES: PubMed and EBSCOHost through December 31, 2016. STUDY SELECTION: Two independent reviewers selected studies based on the following criteria: 1) inclusion of participants with mTBI/concussion, 2) use of a measurement of physiological or psychosomatic response to exertion, 3) a repeatable description of the exertion protocol was provided, 4) a sample of at least 10 participants with a mean age between 8-65 years, and 5) the article was in English...
December 22, 2017: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Grant L Iverson, Douglas P Terry, Justin E Karr, William Panenka, Noah D Silverberg
Perceived injustice is a belief that one has been treated unfairly, disrespectfully, and is suffering unnecessarily as a result of another person's actions. Perceived injustice predicts chronic disability after musculoskeletal injury, but to our knowledge, has not been empirically studied in people with mild traumatic brain injuries (MTBIs). We examined perceived injustice and its correlates in patients who were slow to recover from MTBI. Patients (N=102) were recruited from four concussion clinics. The sample was on average 41...
December 14, 2017: Journal of Neurotrauma
Philip A Cook, Thomas M Johnson, Suzanne G Martin, Philip R Gerhman, Seema Bhatnagar, James C Gee
Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), has been described as the "signature injury" of the Global War on Terror. Explosive blast TBI has become a leading cause of injury as a result of the widespread use of improvised explosive devices in Iraq and Afghanistan. We present a retrospective cross-sectional study of patients with blast-related mild TBI (N=303) seen at the Intrepid Spirit Concussion Recovery Center at Naval Medical Center Camp Lejeune. The objective was to predict outcomes of return to duty (RTD) vs. medical retirement via medical evaluation board (MEB), based on brain imaging, neuropsychological data and history of mTBI...
December 14, 2017: Journal of Neurotrauma
Coleen M Atkins, Helen M Bramlett, W Dalton Dietrich
With nearly 42 million mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBIs) occurring worldwide every year, understanding the factors that may adversely influence recovery after mTBI is important for developing guidelines in mTBI management. Extensive clinical evidence exists documenting the detrimental effects of elevated temperature levels on recovery after moderate to severe TBI. However, whether elevated temperature alters recovery after mTBI or concussion is an active area of investigation. Individuals engaged in exercise and competitive sports regularly experience body and brain temperature increases to hyperthermic levels and these temperature increases are prolonged in hot and humid ambient environments...
2017: F1000Research
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