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Geeta Yadav, Prabhat Kumar Srivastava, Parul Parihar, Sanjesh Tiwari, Sheo Mohan Prasad
In order to know the impact of elevated level of UV-B on arsenic stressed Helianthus annuus L. var. DRSF-113 plants, certain physiological (growth - root and shoot lengths, their fresh masses and leaf area; photosynthetic competence and respiration) and biochemical parameters (pigments - Chl a and b, Car, anthocyanin and flavonoids; reactive oxygen species - superoxide radicals, H2O2; reactive carbonyl group, electrolyte leakage; antioxidants - superoxide dismutase, peroxidise, catalase, glutathione-S-transferase, proline) of their seedlings were analysed under the simultaneous exposures of two arsenic doses (6mgkg(-1) soil, As1; and 12mgkg(-1) soil, As2) and two UV-B doses (1...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology. B, Biology
Yuheng Wang, Konstantin von Gunten, Barbora Bartova, Nicolas Meisser, Markus Astner, Mario Burger, Rizlan Bernier-Latmani
Hundreds of tons of depleted uranium (DU) ammunition were used in previous armed conflicts in Iraq, Bosnia and Herzegovina and Serbia/Kosovo. The majority (>90%) of DU penetrators miss their target and, if left in the environment, corrode in these post-conflict zones. Thus, the best way to understand the fate of bulk DU material in the environment is to characterize the corrosion products of intact DU penetrators under field conditions for extended periods of time. However, such studies are scarce. To fill this knowledge gap, we characterized corrosion products formed from two intact DU penetrators that remained in soils in Bosnia and Herzegovina for over seven years...
October 21, 2016: Environmental Science & Technology
Amanda M West, Paul H Evangelista, Catherine S Jarnevich, Nicholas E Young, Thomas J Stohlgren, Colin Talbert, Marian Talbert, Jeffrey Morisette, Ryan Anderson
Early detection of invasive plant species is vital for the management of natural resources and protection of ecosystem processes. The use of satellite remote sensing for mapping the distribution of invasive plants is becoming more common, however conventional imaging software and classification methods have been shown to be unreliable. In this study, we test and evaluate the use of five species distribution model techniques fit with satellite remote sensing data to map invasive tamarisk (Tamarix spp.) along the Arkansas River in Southeastern Colorado...
October 11, 2016: Journal of Visualized Experiments: JoVE
Karen D Bradham, William Green, Hunter Hayes, Clay Nelson, Pradeep Alava, John Misenheimer, Gary L Diamond, William C Thayer, David J Thomas
Lead (Pb) in soil is an important exposure source for children. Thus, determining bioavailability of Pb in soil is critical in evaluating risk and selecting appropriate strategies to minimize exposure. A mouse model was developed to estimate relative bioavailability of Pb in NIST SRM 2710a (Montana 1 Soil). Based on Pb levels in tissues, the mean relative bioavailability of this metal in this soil was 0.5. Estimates of relative bioavailabilities derived from mouse compared favorably with those obtained in juvenile swine...
October 21, 2016: Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health. Part A
Juying Li, Tuo Huang, Lizong Li, Tengda Ding, Hong Zhu, Bo Yang, Qingfu Ye, Jay Gan
In this study, the fate of paichongding was investigated in three soils with contrasting soil properties. In general, low soil pH has the potential to retard the mineralization and promote the dissipation of paichongding and the formation of its primary transformation product and to accelerate the formation of bound residue. The dissipation of paichongding stereoisomers was very fast and diastereoselective. This selectivity was found only between diastereomers and not between enantiomers and was observed to be soil dependent...
October 21, 2016: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Dominic Woolf, Johannes Lehmann, David R Lee
Restricting global warming below 2 °C to avoid catastrophic climate change will require atmospheric carbon dioxide removal (CDR). Current integrated assessment models (IAMs) and Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change scenarios assume that CDR within the energy sector would be delivered using bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS). Although bioenergy-biochar systems (BEBCS) can also deliver CDR, they are not included in any IPCC scenario. Here we show that despite BECCS offering twice the carbon sequestration and bioenergy per unit biomass, BEBCS may allow earlier deployment of CDR at lower carbon prices when long-term improvements in soil fertility offset biochar production costs...
October 21, 2016: Nature Communications
Erwann Le Gendre, Erwan Martin, Benoit Villemant, Pierre Cartigny, Nelly Assayag
RATIONALE: The O- and S- isotope compositions of sulfates can be used as key tracers of the fate and sink of sulfate in both terrestrial and extra-terrestrial environments. However, their application remains limited in those geological systems where sulfate occurs in low concentrations. Here we present a simple and reliable method to extract, purify and concentrate sulfate from natural samples. The method allows us to take into account the separation of nitrate, which is known to be an issue in O-isotope analysis...
October 21, 2016: Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry: RCM
Erik J Oerter, Alexei Perelet, Eric Pardyjak, Gabriel Bowen
RATIONALE: The fast and accurate measurement of H and O stable isotope compositions (δ(2) H and δ(18) O values) of soil and sediment pore water remains an impediment to scaling-up the application of these isotopes in soil and vadose hydrology. Here we describe a method and its calibration to measuring soil and sediment pore water δ(2) H and δ(18) O values using a water vapor-permeable probe coupled to an Isotope Ratio Infrared Spectroscopy analyzer. METHODS: We compare the water vapor probe method with a vapor direct equilibration method, and vacuum extraction with liquid water analysis...
October 20, 2016: Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry: RCM
M Asaduzzaman Prodhan, Ricarda Jost, Mutsumi Watanabe, Rainer Hoefgen, Hans Lambers, Patrick M Finnegan
Hakea prostrata (Proteaceae) has evolved in an extremely phosphorus- (P) limited environment. This species exhibits an exceptionally low ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and low protein and nitrogen (N) concentration in its leaves. Little is known about the N requirement of this species, and its link to P metabolism, despite this being the key to understanding how it functions with a minimal P budget. Hakea prostrata plants were grown with various N supplies. Metabolite and elemental analyses were performed to determine its N requirement...
October 20, 2016: Plant, Cell & Environment
Li-Xia Zhu, Qian Xiao, Yu-Fang Shen, Shi-Qing Li
Application of maize straw and biochar can potentially improve soil fertility and sequester carbon (C) in the soil, but little information is available about the effects of maize straw and biochar on the mineralization of soil C and nitrogen (N). We conducted a laboratory incubation experiment with five treatments of a cultivated silty loam, biochar produced from maize straw and/or maize straw: soil only (control), soil + 1 % maize straw (S), soil + 4 % biochar (B1), soil + 4 % biochar + 1 % maize straw (B1S), and soil + 8 % biochar + 1 % maize straw (B2S)...
October 20, 2016: Environmental Science and Pollution Research International
Maria Alexandra Bighiu, Ann-Kristin Eriksson-Wiklund, Britta Eklund
The release of harmful metals from antifouling paints to water bodies is a well-known problem. In this study, we measured both the amount of biofouling growth on leisure boats during one season as well as the concentration of metals accumulated by the biofouling matrix. Furthermore, the efficiency of antifouling paints and mechanical boat cleaning as well as the effect of hull colour on biofouling were evaluated. Unlike paint residues, biofouling waste has never been regarded as a source of metal contamination and has previously been neglected in the scientific literature...
October 20, 2016: Environmental Science and Pollution Research International
Diego M Almeida, Glenn B Gregorio, M Margarida Oliveira, Nelson J M Saibo
This manuscript reports the identification and characterization of five transcription factors binding to the promoter of OsNHX1 in a salt stress tolerant rice genotype (Hasawi). Although NHX1 encoding genes are known to be highly regulated at the transcription level by different abiotic stresses, namely salt and drought stress, until now only one transcription factor (TF) binding to its promoter has been reported. In order to unveil the TFs regulating NHX1 gene expression, which is known to be highly induced under salt stress, we have used a Y1H system to screen a salt induced rice cDNA expression library from Hasawi...
October 20, 2016: Plant Molecular Biology
Natalia Lifshitz, Colleen Cassady St Clair
Growth in human populations causes habitat degradation for other species, which is usually gauged by physical changes to landscapes. Corresponding habitat degradation to air and water is also common, but its effects on individuals can be difficult to detect until they result in the decline or disappearance of populations. More proactive measures of pollution usually combine abiotic samples of soil, water or air with invasive sampling of expendable species, but this approach sometimes creates ethical dilemmas and has limited application for threatened species...
2016: Conservation Physiology
Abdul Akbar, Ananya Kuanar, Raj K Joshi, I S Sandeep, Sujata Mohanty, Pradeep K Naik, Antaryami Mishra, Sanghamitra Nayak
The drug yielding potential of turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) is largely due to the presence of phyto-constituent 'curcumin.' Curcumin has been found to possess a myriad of therapeutic activities ranging from anti-inflammatory to neuroprotective. Lack of requisite high curcumin containing genotypes and variation in the curcumin content of turmeric at different agro climatic regions are the major stumbling blocks in commercial production of turmeric. Curcumin content of turmeric is greatly influenced by environmental factors...
2016: Frontiers in Plant Science
Katja Nagler, Antonina O Krawczyk, Anne De Jong, Kazimierz Madela, Tamara Hoffmann, Michael Laue, Oscar P Kuipers, Erhard Bremer, Ralf Moeller
In its natural habitat, the soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis often has to cope with fluctuating osmolality and nutrient availability. Upon nutrient depletion it can form dormant spores, which can revive to form vegetative cells when nutrients become available again. While the effects of salt stress on spore germination have been analyzed previously, detailed knowledge on the salt stress response during the subsequent outgrowth phase is lacking. In this study, we investigated the changes in gene expression during B...
2016: Frontiers in Microbiology
Qing Yu, Weimin Ye, Tom Powers
Gracilacus wuae n. sp. from soil associated with cow parsnip in Ontario, Canada is described and illustrated. Morphologically, females have a long stylet ranging from 80 to 93 µm long, the lip region not offset from the body contour, without lateral lips but with large and flat submedian lobes, the mouth opening slit-like elongated laterally and surrounded by lateral flaps, the excretory pore is anterior to the knobs of the stylet; males without stylet and the pharynx degenerated. The fourth-stage juveniles lack a stylet, the pharynx degenerated, and can be differentiated into preadult females and males based on the position of the genital primordia...
September 2016: Journal of Nematology
Nancy Kokalis-Burelle, Erin N Rosskopf, David M Butler, Steven A Fennimore, John Holzinger
Steam and soil solarization were investigated for control of the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne arenaria in 2 yr of field trials on a commercial flower farm in Florida. The objective was to determine if preplant steam treatments in combination with solarization, or solarization alone effectively controlled nematodes compared to methyl bromide (MeBr). Trials were conducted in a field with naturally occurring populations of M. arenaria. Treatments were solarization alone, steam treatment after solarization using standard 7...
September 2016: Journal of Nematology
Ilhem Guesmi-Mzoughi, Antonio Archidona-Yuste, Carolina Cantalapiedra-Navarrete, Hajer Regaieg, Najet Horrigue-Raouani, Juan E Palomares-Rius, Pablo Castillo
Spiral nematode species of the genus Rotylenchus have been reported on olive (Olea europaea L.) in several Mediterranean countries (Castillo et al., 2010; Ali et al., 2014). Nematological surveys for plant-parasitic nematodes on olive trees were carried out in Tunisia between 2013 and 2014, and two nematode species of Rotylenchus were collected from the rhizosphere of olive cv. Chemlali in several localities of Tunisia (Tables 1,2 [Table: see text] [Table: see text] ). Twenty-two soil samples of 3 to 4 kg were collected with a shovel from the upper 50 cm of soil from arbitrarily chosen olive trees...
September 2016: Journal of Nematology
Emmanuel A Tzortzakakis, Carolina Cantalapiedra-Navarrete, Antonio Archidona-Yuste, Juan E Palomares-Rius, Pablo Castillo
Plant-parasitic nematode species have been reported on several occasions from coastal sand dunes, including Longidorus and Rotylenchus species (Vovlas et al., 2008; De Luca et al., 2009; Mateille et al., 2014). In April 2016, 10 soil samples of 3 to 4 kg from the rhizosphere of Tamarix smyrnensis with different vegetation around (viz. Elymus farctus, Lycium schweinfurthii, Crithmum maritimum, and Arthrocnemum sp.) were collected for diagnosis of plant-parasitic nematodes. The area of sampling was a coastal sand dune near the archeological site of Komos, southwest of Crete, Greece...
September 2016: Journal of Nematology
Hui Zhang, Enli Wang, Daowei Zhou, Zhongkui Luo, Zhengxiang Zhang
Global warming influences a series of ecological processes and ecosystems' stability. Although comprehensive studies have been done to investigate responses of various ecosystem processes to rising air temperatures, less is known about changes in soil temperatures and their impact on below-ground processes, particularly in deep layers. Herein, we used 50 y of temperature data (1962-2011) from 360 sites in China to assess spatio-temporal changes in soil temperatures from the surface to a depth of 3.20 m. We determined, apparently for the first time, that soil surface temperature increased 31% more than air temperature, potentially leading to more carbon release to the atmosphere than predicted...
October 21, 2016: Scientific Reports
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