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progression ckd

Taner Basturk, Ozlem Sari, Yener Koc, Nezaket Eren, Mahmoud Isleem, Ekrem Kara, Mustafa Sevinc, Tamer Sakaci, Elbis Ahbap, Nuri B Hasbal, Feyza B Caglayan, Abdulkadir Unsal
BACKGROUND: Neutrophilgelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) has been proven to be a useful biomarker for early detection of acute kidney injury, but it is not known whether adding NGAL measurements to conventional risk factors will improve the risk assessment in the setting of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The aim of the present study was to examine the correlation of NGAL with early stage renal impairment in CKD and to evaluate its prognostic value in these subjects. METHODS: This is a prospective observational cohort study of 54 patients with early stage (stage 1-2) CKD...
October 21, 2016: Minerva Urologica e Nefrologica, the Italian Journal of Urology and Nephrology
N Gopalakrishnan, R Arul, J Dhanapriya, T Dinesh Kumar, R Sakthirajan, T Balasubramaniyan
Familial lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive (AR) disease caused by mutation in the LCAT gene. LCAT enzyme esterifies cholesterol molecules in high-density lipoprotein(HDL) and low density-lipoprotein (LDL) particles. This enzyme deficiency is characterised by progressive corneal opacification, glomerulopathy, mild - moderate haemolytic anaemia and very low plasma levels of HDL. We here report a 34 year-old lady who presented with hypertension, nephrotic proteinuria, renal failure, corneal ring opacities, anemia and dyslipidemia...
October 2016: Journal of the Association of Physicians of India
Shigeru Shibata, Kenichi Ishizawa, Shunya Uchida
The kidney has a central role in long-term control of blood pressure, and decreased kidney function is a common but difficult-to-treat cause of hypertension. Conversely, elevated blood pressure contributes to the progression of chronic kidney disease. Steroid hormone aldosterone and its receptor mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) contribute to hypertension by increasing renal salt reabsorption and promote kidney dysfunction through direct effects on renal parenchymal cells. Accumulating data indicate that various mechanisms affect aldosterone-MR signaling...
October 20, 2016: Hypertension Research: Official Journal of the Japanese Society of Hypertension
Olga Ruiz-Andres, Maria Dolores Sanchez-Niño, Juan Antonio Moreno, Marta Ruiz-Ortega, Adrian Mario Ramos, Ana Belén Sanz, Alberto Ortiz
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated to an increased risk of death, CKD progression and acute kidney injury (AKI) even from early stages, when glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is preserved. The link between early CKD and these risks is unclear, since there is no accumulation of uremic toxins. However, pathological albuminuria and kidney inflammation are frequent features of early CKD and the production of kidney protective factors may be decreased. Indeed, Klotho expression is already decreased in CKD category G1 (normal GFR)...
October 19, 2016: American Journal of Physiology. Renal Physiology
Mengjing Wang, Jason Chou, Yongen Chang, Wei L Lau, Uttam Reddy, Connie M Rhee, Jing Chen, Chuanming Hao, Kamyar Kalantar-Zadeh
In the management of patients with chronic kidney diseases (CKD), a low-protein diet usually refers to a diet with protein intake of 0.6 to 0.8 grams per kilogram of body weight per day (g/kg/day) and should include at least 50% high-biologic-value protein. It may be supplemented with essential acids or nitrogen- free ketoanalogues if <0.6 g/kg/d. Low-protein diet can reduce proteinuria especially in non-diabetic CKD patients. In hypoalbuminemic patients it may lead to an increase in serum albumin level...
October 19, 2016: Panminerva Medica
Kunal K Sindhu
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by the progressive reduction of glomerular filtration rate and subsequent retention of organic waste compounds called uremic toxins. While patients with CKD are at a higher risk of premature death due to cardiovascular complications, this increased risk cannot be completely explained by classical cardiovascular risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and obesity. Instead, recent research suggests that uremic toxins may play a key role in explaining this marked increase in cardiovascular mortality in patients with CKD...
October 19, 2016: Renal Failure
Raphael Jose Ferreira Felizardo, Angela Castoldi, Vinicius Andrade-Oliveira, Niels Olsen Saraiva Câmara
Recent findings regarding the influence of the microbiota in many inflammatory processes have provided a new way to treat diseases. Now, one may hypothesize that the origin of a plethora of diseases is related to the health of the gut microbiota and its delicate, although complex, interface with the epithelial and immune systems. The 'westernization' of diets, for example, is associated with alterations in the gut microbiota. Such alterations have been found to correlate directly with the increased incidence of diabetes and hypertension, the main causes of chronic kidney diseases (CKDs), which, in turn, have a high estimated prevalence...
June 2016: Clinical & Translational Immunology
Daniel W Jones
Hypertension and Chronic Kidney Disease are both common. The vast majority of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have hypertension. Hypertension can be both a cause and a result of CKD. Many patients with CKD, both diabetic and non-diabetic have overt proteinuria (>300 mg/day). Patients with proteinuria are at higher risk for progression of kidney disease and for atherosclerosis. Because patients with CKD are often excluded from hypertension trials with hard outcomes, there has been until recently less data than ideal to consider in making decisions...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Ran-Hui Cha, Hajeong Lee, Jung Pyo Lee, Chun Soo Lim, Yon Su Kim, Sung Gyun Kim
OBJECTIVE: Blood pressure (BP) control is the most established practice for preventing the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). We examined the BP control and nocturnal dipping pattern change in hypertensive patients with CKD and its effects on target organ damages. DESIGN AND METHOD: We recruited 378 hypertensive CKD patients from 4 centers in Korea. They underwent office and ambulatory BP monitoring at the time of enrollment and 1 year after. High office and ambulatory BP was defined as > 140/90 mmHg and > 135/85 mmHg (daytime)/> 120/70 mmHg (nighttime), respectively...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Dagmara Hering, Petra Marusic, Jacqueline Duval, Yusuke Sata, Murray Esler, Antony Walton, Markus Schlaich
OBJECTIVE: Previous studies have shown that renal denervation has the potential to reduce blood pressure (BP) and slow the decline of renal function in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients up to 12 months post procedure. The effects of RDN on estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and BP reduction beyond the first year remain unknown. This study investigated the effects of RDN on renal function and BP in CKD patients (eGFR ≤ 60 ml/min/1.73 m) out to 24 months post procedure. DESIGN AND METHOD: eGFR from the previous 60 months were retrospectively collected from 46 CKD patients who were scheduled for RDN...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Ernesto Schiffrin
Hypertension has been defined by the levels of BP above which lowering BP will reduce the cardiovascular risk associated with elevated BP. This level has been classically 140/90 mmHg on the basis of actuarial data from the insurance industry. However, we now know that cardiovascular risk rises progressively from levels as low as 115/75 mmHg upward with a doubling of the incidence of both coronary heart disease and stroke for every 20/10-mmHg increment of BP. In uncomplicated hypertension without cardiovascular risk factors or target organ damage, there is little randomized clinical trial evidence that lowering SBP of <160 mmHg reduces cardiovascular risk...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
David Wheeler
Hypertension is the most prevalent complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Lowering high blood pressure slows progressive loss of kidney function and may also reduce the associated risk of cardiovascular complications, a common cause of premature death in CKD patients.Current International Guidelines produced by Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) acknowledges that no single BP target is optimal for all CKD patients, and encourages individualization of treatment depending on age, the severity of albuminuria and comorbidities...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
George Bakris
Resistant hypertension is defined as a blood pressure above 140/90 mmHg despite adherence to a combination of at least three optimally dosed antihypertensive medications, one of which is a diuretic. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is one of the more common patient comorbidities associated with resistant hypertension. Recommended low-salt diet and triple antihypertensive drug regimens that include a diuretic, should be complemented by the sequential addition of other antihypertensive drugs. CKD is associated with premature vascular ageing, characterized by accelerated arteriosclerosis or atherosclerosis and endothelial dysfunction...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Christopher Wilcox
OBJECTIVE: CKD progression is accelerated by hypertension and impaired myogenic responses (MRs) of renal afferent arterioles leading to renal barotrauma. We tested the hypothesis that reactive oxygen species (ROS) underlie both these processes and that ROS metabolism by tempol would thereby protect kidneys. DESIGN AND METHODS: Rat and mouse 5/6 nephrectomy models of reduced renal mass (RRM) vs sham were fed high salt for 3 months during BP telemetry. Individual afferent arterioles were isolated and perfused...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Kazuyuki Shimada
Stroke is known to frequently recur in patients with a history of cerebrovascular disease, and the control of hypertension is extremely important for the treatment of those patients. The robust relationship between the recurrent cerebrovascular disease and blood pressure control has been demonstrated in large-scale clinical studies. The antihypertensive drug therapy significantly reduces the recurrence rate of all types of cerebrovascular disease, incidences of myocardial infarction and all vascular events...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Ana Vrdoljak, Vanja Ivković, Sandra Karanović, Živka Dika, Ivana Vuković, Jelena Kos, Mario Laganović, Tajana Željković Vrkić, Margareta Fištrek Prlić, Ivan Pećin, Bojan Jelaković
OBJECTIVE: It was observed that glomerular hyperfiltration (GHF) is associated with progression of kidney disease in diabetics, patients in stage 1 hypertension (HT), and we found previously that eGFR decreased faster also in prehypertensives (PHT) with GHF. Here we analyzed whether GHF in PHT is associated with other biomarkers of early renal impairment. DESIGN AND METHOD: From 954 subjects enrolled in ENAH follow-up study, 371(137 m;mean age = 46years) were eligible for further analysis:100 with optimal,72 with normal BP,70 with PHT(high normal BP),and 129 with newly diagnosed untreated HT...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Tazeen Jafar
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) defined as reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) or presence of albuminuria, progresses to end stage renal disease (ESRD), needing dialysis or kidney transplant to sustain life, and is associated with increased risks of premature cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality. CKD ranked 18 leading (and most rapidly rising cause of mortality by the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010. The social and economic consequences of CKD are far worse in low and middle income countries (LMICs) including India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Omar Al Dhaybi, George Bakris
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Current evidence showcases the pathologic effects of excess aldosterone in promoting glomerular and tubulointerstitial inflammation and fibrosis through various pathways. The place for mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression is unclear. RECENT FINDINGS: MRAs further reduce albuminuria and blood pressure in CKD patients when used in conjunction with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blockers...
October 7, 2016: Current Opinion in Nephrology and Hypertension
Jia-Ying Zhang, Ying Yin, Li Ni, Quan Long, Li You, Qian Zhang, Shan-Yan Lin, Jing Chen
Low-protein diet plus ketoacids (LPD+KA) has been reported to decrease proteinuria in patients with chronic kidney diseases (CKD). However, the mechanisms have not been clarified. As over-activation of intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been shown to play a key role in the progression of CKD, the current study was performed to investigate the direct effects of LPD+KA on intrarenal RAS, independently of renal haemodynamics. In this study, 3/4 subtotal renal ablated rats were fed 18 % normal-protein diet (Nx-NPD), 6 % low-protein diet (Nx-LPD) or 5 % low-protein diet plus 1 % ketoacids (Nx-LPD+KA) for 12 weeks...
October 18, 2016: British Journal of Nutrition
Hua Chen, Gang Cao, Dan-Qian Chen, Ming Wang, Nosratola D Vaziri, Zhi-Hao Zhang, Jia-Rong Mao, Xu Bai, Ying-Yong Zhao
Early detection is critical in prevention and treatment of kidney disease. However currently clinical laboratory and histopathological tests do not provide region-specific and accurate biomarkers for early detection of kidney disease. The present study was conducted to identify sensitive biomarkers for early detection and progression of tubulo-interstitial nephropathy in aristolochic acid I-induced rats at weeks 4, 8 and 12. Biomarkers were validated using aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN) rats at week 24, adenine-induced chronic kidney disease (CKD) rats and CKD patients...
September 28, 2016: Redox Biology
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