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Cerebral amyloid angiopathy

Young Kyoung Jang, Hee Jin Kim, Jin San Lee, Yeo Jin Kim, Ko Woon Kim, Yeshin Kim, Hyemin Jang, Juyoun Lee, Jong Min Lee, Seung-Joo Kim, Kyung-Ho Yu, Andreas Charidimou, David J Werring, Sung Tae Kim, Duk L Na, Sang Won Seo
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March 21, 2018: Scientific Reports
Anders Wallin, Gustavo C Román, Margaret Esiri, Petronella Kettunen, Johan Svensson, George P Paraskevas, Elisabeth Kapaki
Subcortical small-vessel disease (SSVD) is a disorder well characterized from the clinical, imaging, and neuropathological viewpoints. SSVD is considered the most prevalent ischemic brain disorder, increasing in frequency with age. Vascular risk factors include hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, elevated homocysteine, and obstructive sleep apnea. Ischemic white matter lesions are the hallmark of SSVD; other pathological lesions include arteriolosclerosis, dilatation of perivascular spaces, venous collagenosis, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, microbleeds, microinfarcts, lacunes, and large infarcts...
2018: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
L A Kalashnikova, T S Gulevskaya, L A Dobrynina
Cerebral microangiopathy (small vessels disease) is a cause of diffuse changes of brain tissue (encephalopathy) denoted in Russian literature by the term dyscirculatory encephalopathy (DE). The main cause of microangiopathy leading to encephalopathy is arterial hypertension, less frequently - cerebral amyloid angiopathy and cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy. The diagnosis of encephalopathy in patients with microangiopathy is based on the combination of clinical manifestations (mainly, cognitive impairment of varying severity and disorders of gait) with the neuroimaging changes (white matter hyperintensity, multiple lacunar infarcts on MRI)...
2018: Zhurnal Nevrologii i Psikhiatrii Imeni S.S. Korsakova
Celine Guidoux, Jean-Jacques Hauw, Isabelle F Klein, Julien Labreuche, Claudine Berr, Charles Duyckaerts, Pierre Amarenco
BACKGROUND: Risk factors for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) include hypertension and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). The objective of this study was to determine the autopsy prevalence of CAA and the potential overlap with other risk factors among patients who died from ICH and also the correlation of CAA with cerebral microbleeds. METHODS: We analyzed 81 consecutive autopsy brains from patients with ICH. Staining for CAA detection was performed. We used an age- and sex-matched control group of routine brain autopsies of nonneurological patients to determine the frequencies of CAA and hypertension...
March 20, 2018: Cerebrovascular Diseases
Sven Haller, Meike W Vernooij, Joost P A Kuijer, Elna-Marie Larsson, Hans Rolf Jäger, Frederik Barkhof
Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs), also referred to as microhemorrhages, appear on magnetic resonance (MR) images as hypointense foci notably at T2*-weighted or susceptibility-weighted (SW) imaging. CMBs are detected with increasing frequency because of the more widespread use of high magnetic field strength and of newer dedicated MR imaging techniques such as three-dimensional gradient-echo T2*-weighted and SW imaging. The imaging appearance of CMBs is mainly because of changes in local magnetic susceptibility and reflects the pathologic iron accumulation, most often in perivascular macrophages, because of vasculopathy...
April 2018: Radiology
David Roh, Chung-Huan Sun, J Michael Schmidt, Edip Gurol, Santosh Murthy, Soojin Park, Sachin Agarwal, E Sander Connolly, Jan Claassen
BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Primary intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) studies often use hematoma location rather than ICH etiologies when assessing outcome. Characterizing ICH using hematoma location is effective/reproducible, but may miss heterogeneity among these ICH locations, particularly lobar ICH where competing primary ICH etiologies are possible. We subsequently investigated baseline characteristics/outcome differences of spontaneous, primary ICH by their etiologies: cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) and hypertension...
March 19, 2018: Neurocritical Care
Sándor Csizmadia, Erika Vörös
Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is most commonly recognized by β-amyloid deposition in the small and medium sized vessels of the brain. The 71-year-old female presented with a sudden onset of vertigo and headache. By native computer tomography (CT) examination we found cerebral atrophy and the sign of chronic vascular injury. The complaints of the patient worsened, thus magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed. The MRI scan revealed a bleeding transformation of an ischemic lesion in the right occipital region...
March 2018: Orvosi Hetilap
Turgut Tatlisumak, Brett Cucchiara, Satoshi Kuroda, Scott E Kasner, Jukka Putaala
Nontraumatic intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) is a common subtype of stroke with a poor prognosis, high mortality and long-term morbidity. The incidence of ICH increases with age. ICH has not been widely investigated in young adults (herein defined as aged ∼18-50 years) despite an annual incidence of ∼5 per 100,000 individuals. Furthermore, ICH characteristics differ between young and elderly patients. Risk factors for ICH are surprisingly common in young adults, in whom ICH is often caused by structural lesions or hypertension, and only rarely by anticoagulation therapy and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (which are common predisposing factors in elderly patients)...
March 9, 2018: Nature Reviews. Neurology
Michael Burwinkel, Manuel Lutzenberger, Frank L Heppner, Walter Schulz-Schaeffer, Michael Baier
Seeding and spread of beta-amyloid (Aβ) pathologies have been considered to be based on prion-like mechanisms. However, limited transmissibility of Aβ seeding activity upon peripheral exposure would represent a key difference to prions, not only in terms of pathogenesis but also in terms of potential transmission of disease. We partially characterized the seeded Aβ amyloidosis after intracerebral injection of various brain homogenates in APP/PS1 mice. One particularly seed-laden homogenate was selected to investigate the development of Aβ pathologies after intravenous exposure...
March 5, 2018: Acta Neuropathologica Communications
Matthew MacGregor Sharp, Diederik Bulters, Sebastian Brandner, Janice Holton, Ajay Verma, David J Werring, Roxana O Carare
Aβ, amyloid beta, CAA, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, CT, computed tomographic scanning, IPAD, intramural periarterial drainage, ISF, interstitial fluid, MRI, magnetic resonance imaging, PVS, perivascular spaces, WMH, white matter hyperintensities.Cerebral white matter hyperintensities (WMH) observed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or low attenuation on computed tomographic scanning (CT), are the most frequent brain imaging finding in patients with small vessel disease or dementia. It has been assumed that WMH are due to arteriosclerosis or blood-brain barrier breakdown, though recently it was demonstrated that WMH have distinct molecular signatures in Alzheimer's disease (AD) where markers of Wallerian degeneration are present, compared to normal ageing [1]...
February 27, 2018: Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology
Jason A Chen, Scott C Fears, Anna J Jasinska, Alden Huang, Noor B Al-Sharif, Kevin E Scheibel, Thomas D Dyer, Anne M Fagan, John Blangero, Roger Woods, Matthew J Jorgensen, Jay R Kaplan, Nelson B Freimer, Giovanni Coppola
Background: The Caribbean vervet monkey ( Chlorocebus aethiops sabaeus ) is a potentially valuable animal model of neurodegenerative disease. However, the trajectory of aging in vervets and its relationship to human disease is incompletely understood. Methods: To characterize biomarkers associated with neurodegeneration, we measured cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of Aβ1-40 , Aβ1-42 , total tau, and p-tau181 in 329 members of a multigenerational pedigree...
February 2018: Brain and Behavior
Yang Liu, Yan-Hong Dong, Pei-Yuan Lyu, Wei-Hong Chen, Rui Li
Objective: Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia are responsible for more than 80% of dementia cases. These two conditions share common risk factors including hypertension. Cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) is strongly associated with both hypertension and cognitive impairment. In this review, we identify the pathophysiological changes in CSVD that are caused by hypertension and further explore the relationship between CSVD and cognitive impairment. Data Sources: We searched and scanned the PubMed database for recently published literatures up to December 2017...
March 5, 2018: Chinese Medical Journal
Wei Zhang, Yi Guo, Bo Li, Qi Zhang, Jian-Hui Liu, Guo-Jun Gu, Jin-Hong Wang, Rui-Kang Bao, Yu-Jie Chen, Jian-Rong Xu
Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is present in up to 90% of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), and may interact with classical neuropathology to exacerbate cognitive decline. Since growth differentiation factor 11 (GDF11) can activate vascular remodeling, we tested its effects on cognitive function and neuroinflammatory changes of AD model mice. We intravenously administered GDF11 or vehicle daily to 12-month-old transgenic mice overexpressing the amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP)/PS1). Cognitive function was monitored using the Morris water maze, and after conclusion of the treatment, we assessed the morphology and presence of inflammatory markers in the cerebral vasculature...
2018: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
S Soman, Z Liu, G Kim, U Nemec, S J Holdsworth, K Main, B Lee, S Kolakowsky-Hayner, M Selim, A J Furst, P Massaband, J Yesavage, M M Adamson, P Spincemallie, M Moseley, Y Wang
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Identifying cerebral microhemorrhage burden can aid in the diagnosis and management of traumatic brain injury, stroke, hypertension, and cerebral amyloid angiopathy. MR imaging susceptibility-based methods are more sensitive than CT for detecting cerebral microhemorrhage, but methods other than quantitative susceptibility mapping provide results that vary with field strength and TE, require additional phase maps to distinguish blood from calcification, and depict cerebral microhemorrhages as bloom artifacts...
February 22, 2018: AJNR. American Journal of Neuroradiology
Gerhard Leinenga, Jürgen Götz
Deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide leads to amyloid plaques that together with tau deposits characterize the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). In modeling this pathology, transgenic animals such as the APP23 strain, that expresses a mutant form of the amyloid precursor protein found in familial cases of AD, have been instrumental. In previous studies, we have shown that repeated treatments with ultrasound in a scanning mode (termed scanning ultrasound or SUS) were effective in removing Aβ and restoring memory functions, without the need for a therapeutic agent such as an Aβ antibody...
2018: Frontiers in Neuroscience
Jaeyoon Chung, Xiaoling Zhang, Mariet Allen, Xue Wang, Yiyi Ma, Gary Beecham, Thomas J Montine, Steven G Younkin, Dennis W Dickson, Todd E Golde, Nathan D Price, Nilüfer Ertekin-Taner, Kathryn L Lunetta, Jesse Mez, Richard Mayeux, Jonathan L Haines, Margaret A Pericak-Vance, Gerard Schellenberg, Gyungah R Jun, Lindsay A Farrer
BACKGROUND: Simultaneous consideration of two neuropathological traits related to Alzheimer's disease (AD) has not been attempted in a genome-wide association study. METHODS: We conducted genome-wide pleiotropy analyses using association summary statistics from the Beecham et al. study (PLoS Genet 10:e1004606, 2014) for AD-related neuropathological traits, including neuritic plaque (NP), neurofibrillary tangle (NFT), and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). Significant findings were further examined by expression quantitative trait locus and differentially expressed gene analyses in AD vs...
February 20, 2018: Alzheimer's Research & Therapy
Zane Jaunmuktane, Annelies Quaegebeur, Ricardo Taipa, Miguel Viana-Baptista, Raquel Barbosa, Carolin Koriath, Raf Sciot, Simon Mead, Sebastian Brandner
Amyloid-β (Aβ) is a peptide deposited in the brain parenchyma in Alzheimer's disease and in cerebral blood vessels, causing cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). Aβ pathology is transmissible experimentally in animals and through medical procedures in humans, such as contaminated growth hormone or dura mater transplantation in the context of iatrogenic prion disease. Here, we present four patients who underwent neurosurgical procedures during childhood or teenage years and presented with intracerebral haemorrhage approximately three decades later, caused by severe CAA...
February 15, 2018: Acta Neuropathologica
Muhammad Taimur Malik, Corey Myers, Syed Jaffar Kazmi, Ramin Zand
Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy (CAA) is one of the significant causes of lobar intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) mainly among elderly people. Sporadic cases of CAA have been linked to genetic polymorphisms with an increased risk of disease, an earlier presentation, and an accelerated pathology [1]. Here, we present a patient with no significant risk factors who had a recurrent intracerebral hemorrhage secondary to CAA probably induced by exercise.
December 2017: Journal of Vascular and Interventional Neurology
Masafumi Ihara, Kazuo Washida
Many studies have shown a relationship between atrial fibrillation (AF) and vascular dementia. AF is a major risk factor for stroke, and stroke is the greatest risk factor for vascular dementia. However, the relationship between Alzheimer's disease (AD), the leading cause of dementia, and AF remains unclear. At least four epidemiological studies have reported AF significantly raises the risk of AD 1.5- to 2.5-fold. Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion, resulting from persistent AF, could explain the link as hypoperfusion may mechanistically exacerbate amyloid-β (Aβ) neuropathology, such as senile plaques and amyloid angiopathy, by upregulating Aβ-producing enzymes and lowering Aβ clearance efficiency...
2018: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
Carlo Salvarani, Robert D Brown, Teresa J H Christianson, John Huston, Stephen M Ansell, Caterina Giannini, Gene G Hunder
OBJECTIVES: To record the clinical findings, response to therapy, and course of patients with primary CNS vasculitis (PCNSV) associated with lymphoma. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We reviewed the histories of 936 patients with a diagnosis of any type of vasculitis and lymphoma who were seen at the Mayo Clinic over a 32-year period. Ten patients with both PCNSV and lymphoma were identified. We compared the findings in these 10 patients with those from 158 patients with PCNSV without lymphoma seen over 29 years...
February 2, 2018: Neurology
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