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Subha Rastogi, Madan Mohan Pandey, Aks Rawat
BACKGROUND: Dietary factors play a key role in the development as well as prevention of certain human diseases, including cardiovascular diseases. Currently there has been an increase in global interest to identify medicinal plants that are pharmacologically effective and have low or no side effects for use in preventive medicine. Culinary herbs and spices are an important part of human nutrition in all the cultures of the world. There is a growing amount of literature concerning the potential benefits of these herbs and spices from a health perspective especially in conferring protection against cardiovascular diseases...
October 21, 2016: Current Pharmaceutical Design
Venugopala Rao Konda, Ruckmani Arunachalam, Madhavi Eerike, Ramesh Rao K, Arun Kumar Radhakrishnan, Lakshmipathy Prabhu Raghuraman, Vinayak Meti, Sobita Devi
The gravity of the impact of renal failure on human health is well known and as there is no specific pharmacotherapy for renal failure, the current study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of root extract of Azima tetracantha, an ancient medicinal plant used in Siddha and Ayurvedhic systems of medicine. The experiment was done in glycerol-induced acute renal failure in Wistar albino rats. Thirty rats were divided into five groups. Group 1 was given normal saline (10 ml/kg) per oral, group 2 with single dose of hypertonic glycerol (8 ml/kg) by intramuscular injection into the hind limbs, group 3 with glycerol and ethanolic extract of A...
October 2016: Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine
Kevin J Galinsky, Po-Ru Loh, Swapan Mallick, Nick J Patterson, Alkes L Price
Analyzing genetic differences between closely related populations can be a powerful way to detect recent adaptation. The very large sample size of the UK Biobank is ideal for using population differentiation to detect selection and enables an analysis of the UK population structure at fine resolution. In this study, analyses of 113,851 UK Biobank samples showed that population structure in the UK is dominated by five principal components (PCs) spanning six clusters: Northern Ireland, Scotland, northern England, southern England, and two Welsh clusters...
October 14, 2016: American Journal of Human Genetics
Anna Juras, Maciej Chyleński, Marta Krenz-Niedbała, Helena Malmström, Edvard Ehler, Łukasz Pospieszny, Sylwia Łukasik, Józef Bednarczyk, Janusz Piontek, Mattias Jakobsson, Miroslawa Dabert
We applied an interdisciplinary approach to investigate kinship patterns and funerary practices during the middle Neolithic. Genetic studies, radiocarbon dating, and taphonomic analyses were used to examine two grave clusters from Krusza Zamkowa, Poland. To reconstruct kinship and determine biological sex, we extracted DNA from bones and teeth, analyzed mitochondrial genomes and nuclear SNPs using the HID-Ion AmpliSeq™ Identity panel generated on Illumina and Ion Torrent platforms, respectively. We further dated the material (AMS (14)C) and to exclude aquatic radiocarbon reservoir effects, measures of carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes for diet reconstruction were used...
October 14, 2016: Forensic Science International. Genetics
Leah Hobert, Emanuela Binello
Trepanation, the process of making a burr hole in the skull to access the brain, is an ancient form of a primitive craniotomy. There is widespread evidence of contributions made to this practice by ancient civilizations in Europe, Africa, and South America, where archaeologists have unearthed thousands of trepanned skulls dating back to the Neolithic period. Little is known about trepanation in China, and it is commonly believed that the Chinese only used traditional Chinese medicine and nonsurgical methods for treating brain injuries...
October 18, 2016: World Neurosurgery
Diyendo Massilani, Silvia Guimaraes, Jean-Philip Brugal, E Andrew Bennett, Malgorzata Tokarska, Rose-Marie Arbogast, Gennady Baryshnikov, Gennady Boeskorov, Jean-Christophe Castel, Sergey Davydov, Stéphane Madelaine, Olivier Putelat, Natalia N Spasskaya, Hans-Peter Uerpmann, Thierry Grange, Eva-Maria Geigl
BACKGROUND: Climatic and environmental fluctuations as well as anthropogenic pressure have led to the extinction of much of Europe's megafauna. The European bison or wisent (Bison bonasus), one of the last wild European large mammals, narrowly escaped extinction at the onset of the 20th century owing to hunting and habitat fragmentation. Little is known, however, about its origin, evolutionary history and population dynamics during the Pleistocene. RESULTS: Through ancient DNA analysis we show that the emblematic European bison has experienced several waves of population expansion, contraction, and extinction during the last 50,000 years in Europe, culminating in a major reduction of genetic diversity during the Holocene...
October 21, 2016: BMC Biology
James Starrett, Shahan Derkarabetian, Marshal Hedin, Robert W Bryson, John E McCormack, Brant C Faircloth
Arachnida is an ancient, diverse, and ecologically important animal group that contains a number of species of interest for medical, agricultural, and engineering applications. Despite their importance, many aspects of the arachnid tree of life remain unresolved, hindering comparative approaches to arachnid biology. Biologists have made considerable efforts to resolve the arachnid phylogeny; yet, limited and challenging morphological characters, as well as a dearth of genetic resources, have hindered progress...
October 21, 2016: Molecular Ecology Resources
Seth Bybee, Alex Córdoba-Aguilar, M Catherine Duryea, Ryo Futahashi, Bengt Hansson, M Olalla Lorenzo-Carballa, Ruud Schilder, Robby Stoks, Anton Suvorov, Erik I Svensson, Janne Swaegers, Yuma Takahashi, Phillip C Watts, Maren Wellenreuther
Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies) present an unparalleled insect model to integrate evolutionary genomics with ecology for the study of insect evolution. Key features of Odonata include their ancient phylogenetic position, extensive phenotypic and ecological diversity, several unique evolutionary innovations, ease of study in the wild and usefulness as bioindicators for freshwater ecosystems worldwide. In this review, we synthesize studies on the evolution, ecology and physiology of odonates, highlighting those areas where the integration of ecology with genomics would yield significant insights into the evolutionary processes that would not be gained easily by working on other animal groups...
2016: Frontiers in Zoology
Mu He, Stephanie Agbu, Kathryn V Anderson
The mammalian Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is required for development and for maintenance of adult stem cells, and overactivation of the pathway can cause tumorigenesis. All responses to Hh family ligands in mammals require the primary cilium, an ancient microtubule-based organelle that extends from the cell surface. Genetic studies in mice and humans have defined specific functions for cilium-associated microtubule motor proteins: they act in the construction and disassembly of the primary cilium, they control ciliary length and stability, and some have direct roles in mammalian Hh signal transduction...
October 17, 2016: Trends in Cell Biology
X F Song, X D Chen
Aloe vera has been widely investigated and used as folk medicine since ancient time. Biologically active substances in its gel include polysaccharides, glycoprotein, enzymes, anthraquinones or phenolic compounds, vitamins, minerals, and so on, which play important roles in anti-inflammatory response, antimicrobial, antiviral, antioxidant activity, immunoregulation effects, and especially in wound healing. In this paper, we review the advances in the mechanism and clinical application of Aloe vera and its extract on wound healing, so as to provide new ideas for the treatment of various kinds of wounds...
October 20, 2016: Zhonghua Shao Shang za Zhi, Zhonghua Shaoshang Zazhi, Chinese Journal of Burns
Isabella C C von Holstein, Penelope Walton Rogers, Oliver E Craig, Kirsty E H Penkman, Jason Newton, Matthew J Collins
We investigate the origin of archaeological wool textiles preserved by anoxic waterlogging from seven medieval archaeological deposits in north-western Europe (c. 700-1600 AD), using geospatial patterning in carbon (δ13C), nitrogen (δ15N) and non-exchangeable hydrogen (δ2H) composition of modern and ancient sheep proteins. δ13C, δ15N and δ2H values from archaeological wool keratin (n = 83) and bone collagen (n = 59) from four sites were interpreted with reference to the composition of modern sheep wool from the same regions...
2016: PloS One
Marco Cavarzere
This paper focuses on the shift that occurred in the spatial representation of states in the eighteenth century. This shift will be considered as a combination of institutional reforms and of a new social awareness of space. A consideration of the case of the Italian Piedmont will demonstrate how "national" space was created through antiquarian research and how a larger political confrontation took place in the guise of a learned debate. The diverse accounts of Piedmontese history under examination all employed methods derived from previous ages, relying upon a concept of space as historically continuous, embedded in time immemorial...
2016: Journal of the History of Ideas
Peter T Struck
Ancient Greeks drew advice from oracles, dreams, entrails, the movements of birds, sneezes, and myriad other sources for divination. Classicists typically study such phenomena as examples of occult religion, or for their use as a social mechanism for managing dissent and forging consensus. Ancient philosophical accounts by contrast go a longer way toward considering them seriously, on their own terms. They take them as an invitation into developing speculative accounts of non-standard epistemological schemes...
2016: Journal of the History of Ideas
Vendela K Lagerholm, Edson Sandoval-Castellanos, Amélie Vaniscotte, Olga R Potapova, Teresa Tomek, Zbigniew M Bochenski, Paul Shepherd, Nick Barton, Marie-Claire Van Dyck, Rebecca Miller, Jacob Höglund, Nigel G Yoccoz, Love Dalén, John R Stewart
Global warming is predicted to cause substantial habitat rearrangements, with the most severe effects expected to occur in high-latitude biomes. However, one major uncertainty is whether species will be able to shift their ranges to keep pace with climate-driven environmental changes. Many recent studies on mammals have shown that past range contractions have been associated with local extinctions rather than survival by habitat tracking. Here, we have used an interdisciplinary approach that combines ancient DNA techniques, coalescent simulations and species distribution modelling, to investigate how two common cold-adapted bird species, willow and rock ptarmigan (Lagopus lagopus and Lagopus muta), respond to long-term climate warming...
October 20, 2016: Global Change Biology
Garrett J McKinney, Ryan K Waples, Lisa W Seeb, James E Seeb
Whole genome duplications have occurred in the recent ancestors of many plants, fish, and amphibians, resulting in a pervasiveness of paralogous loci and the potential for both disomic and tetrasomic inheritance in the same genome. Paralogs can be difficult to reliably genotype and are often excluded from genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) analyses; however, removal requires paralogs to be identified which is difficult without a reference genome. We present a method for identifying paralogs in natural populations by combining two properties of duplicated loci: 1) the expected frequency of heterozygotes exceeds that for singleton loci, and 2) within heterozygotes, observed read ratios for each allele in GBS data will deviate from the 1:1 expected for singleton (diploid) loci...
October 19, 2016: Molecular Ecology Resources
Fátima Sánchez Barreiro, Filipe G Vieira, Michael D Martin, James Haile, M Thomas P Gilbert, Nathan Wales
Population genetic studies of non-model organisms frequently employ reduced representation library (RRL) methodologies, many of which rely on protocols in which genomic DNA is digested by one or more restriction enzymes. However, because high molecular weight DNA is recommended for these protocols, samples with degraded DNA are generally unsuitable for RRL methods. Given that ancient and historic specimens can provide key temporal perspectives to evolutionary questions, we explored how custom-designed RNA probes could enrich for RRL loci (Restriction Enzyme-Associated Loci baits, or REALbaits)...
October 19, 2016: Molecular Ecology Resources
Shobhit Srivastava, Anil K Saksena, Sanjay Khattri, Santosh Kumar, Raghubendra Singh Dagur
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Curcuma longa L. (CL), an Indian herb, has been used to treat many disorders because of its wide spectrum of pharmacological activities. It has been shown to exhibit anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, and is being used as herbal remedy since ancient times. Osteoarthritis of knee (KOA) is a chronic painful disorder in which prolong use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or steroids may result into many serious side effects; hence, there is a need to develop herbal drugs, having good analgesia without side effects...
October 19, 2016: Inflammopharmacology
Nashmiah Aid Alrashedy, Jeanmaire Molina
Psychoactive plants contain chemicals that presumably evolved as allelochemicals but target certain neuronal receptors when consumed by humans, altering perception, emotion and cognition. These plants have been used since ancient times as medicines and in the context of religious rituals for their various psychoactive effects (e.g., as hallucinogens, stimulants, sedatives). The ubiquity of psychoactive plants in various cultures motivates investigation of the commonalities among these plants, in which a phylogenetic framework may be insightful...
2016: PeerJ
Daifeng Wang, Fei He, Sergei Maslov, Mark Gerstein
Gene expression is controlled by the combinatorial effects of regulatory factors from different biological subsystems such as general transcription factors (TFs), cellular growth factors and microRNAs. A subsystem's gene expression may be controlled by its internal regulatory factors, exclusively, or by external subsystems, or by both. It is thus useful to distinguish the degree to which a subsystem is regulated internally or externally-e.g., how non-conserved, species-specific TFs affect the expression of conserved, cross-species genes during evolution...
October 2016: PLoS Computational Biology
Hanan R Shehata, Cassandra L Ettinger, Jonathan A Eisen, Manish N Raizada
Endophytes are microbes that inhabit internal plant tissues without causing disease. Some endophytes are known to combat pathogens. The corn (maize) landrace Chapalote has been grown continuously by subsistence farmers in the Americas since 1000 BC, without the use of fungicides, and the crop remains highly valued by farmers, in part for its natural tolerance to pests. We hypothesized that the pathogen tolerance of Chapalote may, in part, be due to assistance from its endophytes. We previously identified a bacterial endophyte from Chapalote seeds, Burkholderia gladioli strain 3A12, for its ability to combat a diversity of crop pathogens, including Sclerotinia homoeocarpa, the most important fungal disease of creeping bentgrass, a relative of maize used here as a model system...
2016: Frontiers in Microbiology
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