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Malaria review

G MuŽíková, R Laga
Vaccines have helped considerably in eliminating some life-threatening infectious diseases in past two hundred years. Recently, human medicine has focused on vaccination against some of the world's most common infectious diseases (AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, etc.), and vaccination is also gaining popularity in the treatment of cancer or autoimmune diseases. The major limitation of current vaccines lies in their poor ability to generate a sufficient level of protective antibodies and T cell responses against diseases such as HIV, malaria, tuberculosis and cancers...
October 20, 2016: Physiological Research
Jesica F Ramírez, Beatriz Porras, Elizabeth Borrero, Sandra P Martínez
BACKGROUND: Malaria worldwide annual reported cases range between 250 and 500 million and nearly half a million deaths are reported every year. Colombia has a vast expanse of territory with environmental and social conditions conducive to malaria transmission, which is the reason why it has second place in Latin America for the number of cases of malaria. METHODS: This is a retrospective, paired, case-control study that compares patients with severe malaria and malaria patients without mention of complication...
October 19, 2016: Malaria Journal
Neha Chaturvedi, Praveen K Bharti, Archana Tiwari, Neeru Singh
Transmission blocking malaria vaccines are aimed to block the development and maturity of sexual stages of parasite within mosquitoes. The vaccine candidate antigens (Pfs25, Pfs48/45, Pfs230) that have shown transmission blocking immunity in model systems are in different stages of development. These antigens are immunogenic with limited genetic diversity. Pfs25 is a leading candidate and currently in phase I clinical trial. Efforts are now focused on the cost-effective production of potent antigens using safe adjuvants and optimization of vaccine delivery system that are capable of inducing strong immune responses...
June 2016: Indian Journal of Medical Research
Axel Martinelli, Richard Culleton
The study of malaria in the laboratory relies on either the in vitro culture of human parasites, or the use of non-human malaria parasites in laboratory animals. In this review, we address the use of non-human primate malaria parasite species (NHPMPs) in laboratory research. We describe the features of the most commonly used NHPMPs, review their contribution to our understanding of malaria to date, and discuss their potential contribution to future studies.
October 17, 2016: Parasitology
(no author information available yet)
BACKGROUND: Non-fatal outcomes of disease and injury increasingly detract from the ability of the world's population to live in full health, a trend largely attributable to an epidemiological transition in many countries from causes affecting children, to non-communicable diseases (NCDs) more common in adults. For the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2015 (GBD 2015), we estimated the incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for diseases and injuries at the global, regional, and national scale over the period of 1990 to 2015...
October 8, 2016: Lancet
Alvaro Molina-Cruz, Martine M Zilversmit, Daniel E Neafsey, Daniel L Hartl, Carolina Barillas-Mury
Plasmodium falciparum malaria remains a devastating public health problem. Recent discoveries have shed light on the origin and evolution of Plasmodium parasites and their interactions with their vertebrate and mosquito hosts. P. falciparum malaria originated in Africa from a single horizontal transfer between an infected gorilla and a human, and became global as the result of human migration. Today, P. falciparum malaria is transmitted worldwide by more than 70 different anopheline mosquito species. Recent studies indicate that the mosquito immune system can be a barrier to malaria transmission and that the P...
October 3, 2016: Annual Review of Genetics
Anju Singh, Mudasir Maqbool, Mohammad Mobashir, Nasimul Hoda
Malaria is a critical human disease with extensive exploration yet unestablished due to occurrence of frequent drug resistance. This aspect of malaria pharmacology calls for the introduction of new antimalarial. The drugs reported till date targeted different stages of the parasites in order to stop their growth and proliferation. Beside this, various drugs that could inhibit the imperative enzymes of the parasite have also been reported. Amid them, dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) has a key worth. DHODH is involved in the de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis of the malarial parasite which acts as a primary source of energy for its survival...
September 27, 2016: European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry
Sophie Desmonde, Tessa Goetghebuer, Claire Thorne, Valériane Leroy
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The number of HIV-exposed but uninfected (HEU) infants exposed to both HIV and multiple antiretroviral drugs in utero and during prolonged breastfeeding is increasing in low-income countries where HIV prevalence is the highest. We review recent evidence on the effects of perinatal/postnatal exposure to maternal HIV and combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) on health outcomes of HEU children (mitochondrial and metabolic toxicity, adverse pregnancy outcomes, neurodevelopment, growth, infectious morbidity, and mortality)...
September 2016: Current Opinion in HIV and AIDS
Qurrat-Ul- Ain, Haroon Khan, Mohammad S Mubarak, Aini Pervaiz
An alkaloid is a class of naturally occurring organic nitrogen-containing compounds that are frequently found in the plant kingdom. Many alkaloids are valuable medicinal agents that can be utilized to treat various diseases including malaria, diabetics, cancer, cardiac dysfunction etc. Similarly, platelet aggregation beyond the purpose of homeostasis is the underlying cause of blood clotting related diseases. This review presents a thorough understanding of alkaloids as antiplatelet agents with a possible mechanism of action based on the literature of the last decade...
2016: Frontiers in Pharmacology
Adrienne Lynne White, Thaw Htwe Min, Mechthild M Gross, Ladda Kajeechiwa, May Myo Thwin, Borimas Hanboonkunupakarn, Hla Hla Than, Thet Wai Zin, Marcus J Rijken, Gabie Hoogenboom, Rose McGready
BACKGROUND: To evaluate a skilled birth attendant (SBA) training program in a neglected population on the Thai-Myanmar border, we used multiple methods to show that refugee and migrant health workers can be given effective training in their own environment to become SBAs and teachers of SBAs. The loss of SBAs through resettlement to third countries necessitated urgent training of available workers to meet local needs. METHODS AND FINDINGS: All results were obtained from student records of theory grades and clinical log books...
2016: PloS One
Arti Vashist, Ajeet Kaushik, Atul Vashist, Rahul Dev Jayant, Asahi Tomitaka, Sharif Ahmad, Y K Gupta, Madhavan Nair
Since centuries, the rapid spread and cure of infectious diseases have been a major concern to the progress and survival of humans. These diseases are a global burden and the prominent cause for worldwide deaths and disabilities. Nanomedicine has emerged as the most excellent tool to eradicate and halt their spread. Various nanoformulations (NFs) using advanced nanotechnology are in demand. Recently, hydrogel and nanogel based drug delivery devices have posed new prospects to simulate the natural intelligence of various biological systems...
October 18, 2016: Biomaterials Science
J Kevin Baird, Neena Valecha, Stephan Duparc, Nicholas J White, Ric N Price
The diagnosis and treatment of Plasmodium vivax malaria differs from that of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in fundamentally important ways. This article reviews the guiding principles, practices, and evidence underpinning the diagnosis and treatment of P vivax malaria.
October 5, 2016: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Anupkumar R Anvikar, Naman Shah, Akshay C Dhariwal, Gagan Singh Sonal, Madan Mohan Pradhan, Susanta K Ghosh, Neena Valecha
Historically, malaria in India was predominantly caused by Plasmodium vivax, accounting for 53% of the estimated cases. After the spread of drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum in the 1990s, the prevalence of the two species remained equivalent at the national level for a decade. By 2014, the proportion of P. vivax has decreased to 34% nationally, but with high regional variation. In 2014, P. vivax accounted for around 380,000 malaria cases in India; almost a sixth of all P. vivax cases reported globally. Plasmodium vivax has remained resistant to control measures, particularly in urban areas...
October 5, 2016: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Sovannaroth Siv, Arantxa Roca-Feltrer, Seshu Babu Vinjamuri, Denis Mey Bouth, Dysoley Lek, Mohammad Abdur Rashid, Ngau Peng By, Jean Popovici, Rekol Huy, Didier Menard
The Cambodian National Strategic Plan for Elimination of Malaria aims to move step by step toward elimination of malaria across Cambodia with an initial focus on Plasmodium falciparum malaria before achieving elimination of all forms of malaria, including Plasmodium vivax in 2025. The emergence of artemisinin-resistant P. falciparum in western Cambodia over the last decade has drawn global attention to support the ultimate goal of P. falciparum elimination, whereas the control of P. vivax lags much behind, making the 2025 target gradually less achievable unless greater attention is given to P...
October 5, 2016: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
José María Parisi, José Luis Castro, María Celina Luque, Marta Spinetto, Patricia Saidón, James Fitzgerald
Objective To describe the benefits obtained through South-South and triangular cooperation as a potential tool for strengthening medicine quality control in official medicines control laboratories (OMCLs) of the Region of the Americas. Methods Descriptive study of the project for strengthening drug quality control in OMCLs of the Caribbean community (CARICOM). Results Staff members of Argentina's National Administration for Drugs, Food, and Medical Technology (ANMAT) provided training to professionals from Guyana, Jamaica, Suriname, and Trinidad and Tobago...
May 2016: Revista Panamericana de Salud Pública, Pan American Journal of Public Health
Haythem A Saadeh, Mohammad S Mubarak
Antimicrobial resistance to drugs is a serious threat to public health. Different strategies have been adopted to deal with antimicrobial resistance to known drugs, one such strategy is the use of drug hybrids; this is a promising strategy to address the growing problem of drug resistance. The present review covers the very recent examples of combining (hybrid) of two standard drugs in a single molecule for resistant bacteria and malaria, and to present evidence supporting that drug hybrids are the urgent and practical solution to stop or slow down the spread of drug resistance...
September 27, 2016: Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry
Michelle de Oliveira Pedrosa, Rayssa Marques Duarte da Cruz, Jéssika Oliveira Viana, Ricardo Olímpio de Moura, Hamilton Mitsugu Ishiki, José Maria Barbosa Filho, Margareth F F M Diniz, Marcus Tullius Scotti, Luciana Scotti, Francisco Jaime Bezerra Mendonça
Molecular Hybridization is an approach in rational drug design where new chemical entities are obtained by combining two or more pharmacophoric units from different bioactive compounds into a single molecule. Through this approach, medicinal chemists hope that the new hybrid derivative presents: better affinity and efficacy when compared to the parent drugs; a modified selectivity profile with improvement over pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic restrictions; dual or multiple modes of action; reduction of undesirable side effects; decreases in drug-drug interactions; reduced emergence or spread of drug resistance in microorganisms and protozoans; and lower cost...
September 27, 2016: Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry
Louise K Andersen, Mark D P Davis
Climate change refers to variation in the climate of a specific region or globally over time. A change has been reported in the epidemiology of tick- and mosquito-borne diseases in recent decades. Investigators have postulated that this effect may be associated with climate change. We reviewed the English-language literature describing changes in the epidemiology of specific tick- and mosquito-borne diseases, including the tick-borne diseases of Lyme disease, tularemia, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, Mediterranean spotted fever, and Rocky Mountain spotted fever and the mosquito-borne diseases of dengue, malaria, West Nile virus infection, Ross River virus disease, and Barmah Forest virus disease...
October 1, 2016: International Journal of Dermatology
Ann M Moormann, Jeffrey A Bailey
Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is >90% EBV-associated when this pediatric cancer is diagnosed in regions heavily burden by endemic Plasmodium falciparum malaria and thus has been geographically classified as endemic BL. The incidence of endemic BL is 10-fold higher compared to BL diagnosed in non-malarious regions of the world. The other forms of BL have been classified as sporadic BL which contain EBV in ∼30% of cases and immunodeficiency BL which occurs in HIV-infected adults with ∼40% of tumors containing EBV...
September 26, 2016: Current Opinion in Virology
Florence Mgawadere, Regine Unkels, Adetoro Adegoke, Nynke van den Broek
BACKGROUND: Assessing the feasibility of conducting a prospective Reproductive Age Mortality Survey (RAMOS) study in the low-income setting of Mangochi District, Malawi to obtain cotemporaneous estimates of the number, cause of and conditions associated with maternal deaths (MD) in all women of reproductive age (WRA) (n = 207 688). METHODS: MD among all deaths of WRA were identified using the ICD-10 definition. Cause of death and contributing conditions identified by a panel of experts using the classification system for deaths during pregnancy, childbirth and puerperium (ICD-MM)...
September 29, 2016: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
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