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Renato Foschi, Marco Innamorati, Ruggero Taradel
The present paper is focused on the evolution of the position of the Catholic Church toward psychoanalysis. Even before Freud's The Future of an Illusion (1927), psychoanalysis was criticized by Catholic theologians. Psychoanalysis was viewed with either contempt or with indifference, but nonpsychoanalytic psychotherapy was accepted, especially for pastoral use. Freudian theory remained for most Catholics a delicate and dangerous subject for a long time. From the center to the periphery of the Vatican, Catholic positions against psychoanalysis have varied in the way that theological stances have varied...
March 12, 2018: Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences
Mackson Strayer
The time period from 1840 to 1950 was one of rapid, dramatic change in the experience of suffering from and receiving treatment for obsessional disorder in the United States. Several patient case histories are discussed in detail, including those of a theology professor's acquaintance (1844), a wealthy gentleman (1880), a hosiery shop proprietor (1938), and a former college student (1949). Although the focus here is on the patients' experience, many broader aspects of the history of obsessional disorder are also explored...
January 1, 2018: Journal of Medical Biography
Faisal Qazi, Don Fette, Syed S Jafri, Aasim I Padela
Famously posed by seventeenth-century French philosopher René Descartes, the mind-body problem remains unresolved in western philosophy and science, with both disciplines unable to move convincingly beyond the dualistic model. The persistence of dualism calls for a reframing of the problem through interdisciplinary modes of inquiry that include non-western points of view. One such perspective is Islamic theology of the soul, which, while approaching the problem from a distinct point of view, also adopts a position commensurate with (substance) dualism...
March 5, 2018: New Bioethics: a Multidisciplinary Journal of Biotechnology and the Body
Ali Eryilmaz, Naci Kula
The overall aim of this study was to develop the Islamic Well-Being Scale and examine the relationship between mental health and Islamic well-being. In this study, four sub-studies were performed to create the one-factor Islamic Well-Being Scale, perform a confirmatory factor analysis and validate the Islamic Well-Being Scale, differentially predict ill-being and well-being outcomes using the Islamic Well-Being Scale, and compare individuals with different Islamic belief levels using the Islamic Well-Being Scale...
March 2, 2018: Journal of Religion and Health
Yazeed Gussous, Alexander A Theologis, Joshua B Demb, Jennifer Tangtiphaiboontana, Sigurd Berven
Study Design: Secondary analysis of prospective, multicenter data. Objective: To evaluate impact of sagittal parameters on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in adults with lumbosacral spondylolisthesis. Methods: Adults with unoperated lumbosacral spondylolisthesis were identified in the Spinal Deformity Study Group database. Pearson's correlations were calculated between SF-12 (Short Form-12)/Scoliosis Research Society-30 (SRS-30) scores and radiographic parameters (C7 sagittal vertical axis [SVA] deviation, T1 pelvic angle, pelvic tilt [PT], pelvic incidence, sacral slope, slip angle, Meyerding slip grade, Labelle classification)...
February 2018: Global Spine Journal
Sadie P Hutson, Caroline K Darlington, Joanne M Hall, R Eric Heidel, Susan Gaskins
The Appalachian South is disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS. Partly due to the negative connotation that this disease carries in religiously conservative areas, HIV-related stigma remains a critical barrier to HIV care in the South. However, spirituality is a well-documented, effective coping mechanism among persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH). The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between HIV-related stigma and spiritual well-being among a sample of PLWH (n = 216) in Appalachian counties of Tennessee and Alabama using the HIV Stigma Scale and the Spiritual Well-being Scale...
February 15, 2018: Issues in Mental Health Nursing
Reggie Abraham
This article revisits Donald Capps's book The Depleted Self (The depleted self: sin in a narcissistic age. Fortress Press, Minneapolis, 1993), which grew out of his 1990 Schaff Lectures at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary. In these lectures Capps proposed that the theology of guilt had dominated much of post-Reformation discourse. But with the growing prevalence of the narcissistic personality in the late twentieth century, the theology of guilt no longer adequately expressed humanity's sense of "wrongness" before God...
February 14, 2018: Journal of Religion and Health
Mohsin Choudry, Aishah Latif, Katharine G Warburton
For many who pertain to particular theological paradigms, their faith cannot be compartmentalised, but is mobilised to inform all aspects of their being, most notably their ethical and moral persuasions. As clinicians, the concept that there are good and bad deaths is already known; understanding the origin and depth of non-physical suffering, and aiming to alleviate it is not possible without learning the individual experiences and beliefs that go with it. Spiritual care forms a fundamental consideration in the endeavor to address the holistic experience of those patients receiving palliative care...
February 2018: Clinical Medicine: Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of London
Izet Masic
After the collapse of the Arab rule, the Arab territorial expanses and cultural heritage were taken over by the Turks. Although scientific progress in the Turkish period slowed down due to numerous unfavorable political-economic and other circumstances. Thanks to the Turks, Arabic culture and useful Islamic principles expanded to the territory of our homeland of Bosnia and Herzegovina (B&H). Significant role in the transfer of Arabic pharmaceutical knowledge was also attributed to the Sephardic Jews who, with their arrival, continued to perform their attar activities, which were largely based on Arab achievements...
December 2017: Medical Archives
Alexander A Theologis, Matthew Crawford, Mohammad Diab
STUDY DESIGN: Cohort analysis. OBJECTIVE: Document satisfaction with management and appearance concerns in children of different ethnicity who underwent spinal fusion/instrumentation for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Scoliosis Research Society Questionnaire (SRS-30) outcomes in AIS indicate a link between appearance and satisfaction as well as ethnic variation in appearance domain. Exploration of these findings in the Scoliosis Appearance Questionnaire (SAQ) will allow better understanding of ethnic variation in appearance concerns...
March 2018: Spine Deformity
Aasim I Padela, Danish Zaidi
Objective: The objective of this study was to identify mechanisms by which Islamic beliefs, values, and Muslim identity might contribute to health inequities among Muslim populations. Methods: A systematic literature review of empirical studies in Medline from 1980 to 2009 was conducted. The search strategy used three terms covering health-care disparities, ethnicity, and location to uncover relevant papers. Results: A total of 171 articles were relevant based on titles and abstracts...
January 2018: Avicenna Journal of Medicine
Tricia M Ross
Approximately thirty almost entirely overlooked books appeared in Europe between 1500 and 1700 that include the word anthropologia in their titles. At first glance, the content of these works bears no resemblance to anthropology as we think of it. They present a combination of medieval traditions, cutting-edge medical practices, and evolving natural philosophical and theological systems found in universities of all confessions across Europe. But these largely overlooked sources reveal that the disciplines we use to study ourselves may have developed from an intertwined natural philosophical and religious system...
2018: Journal of the History of Ideas
Michael Barlev, Spencer Mermelstein, Tamsin C German
Previous research has shown that in the minds of young adult religious adherents, acquired theology about the extraordinary characteristics of God (e.g., omniscience) coexists with, rather than replaces, an initial concept of God formed by co-option of the person concept. We tested the hypothesis that representational coexistence holds even after extensive experience with Christian theology, as indexed by age. Christian religious adherents ranging in age from 18 to 87 years were asked to evaluate as true or false statements on which core knowledge intuitions about persons and Christian theology about God were consistent (both true or both false) or inconsistent (true on one and false on the other)...
January 25, 2018: Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
Chaïma Ahaddour, Stef Van den Branden, Bert Broeckaert
The aim of this article is threefold. First, we seek to elicit the attitudes and practices of middle-aged and elderly Moroccan Muslim women towards ageing and care for the elderly. Second, we aim to identify possible differences between middle-aged and elderly women's attitudes and practices. Third, we seek to explore which role religion plays in their attitudes and practices. Qualitative empirical research was conducted with a sample of middle-aged and elderly Moroccan Muslim women living in Antwerp (Belgium) (n = 30) and with experts in the field (n = 15)...
January 23, 2018: Journal of Religion and Health
Jennifer McCahill, Julie Stebbins, Bart Koning, Jaap Harlaar, Tim Theologis
INTRODUCTION: The Oxford Foot Model (OFM) is a multi-segment, kinematic model developed to assess foot motion. It has previously been assessed for repeatability in healthy populations. To determine the OFM's reliability for detecting foot deformity, it is important to know repeatability in pathological conditions. The aim of the study was to assess the repeatability of the OFM in children with foot deformity. METHODS: Intra-tester repeatability was assessed for 45 children (15 typically developing, 15 hemiplegic, 15 clubfoot)...
December 26, 2017: Gait & Posture
Vesa Hirvonen
No matter from which perspective Witelo, Oresme and Gerson approach mental disorders, they think that madness usually has a bodily, such as a humoral or organic, origin. They do, however, consider divine or demonic causes as possibly being behind immediate causes. According to Witelo and the Parisians, because of a change in the body, madmen's sensory fantasy is disturbed and in this situation their intellect does not act normally, and their will lacks freedom. It is important to realize that, according to the medieval writers, mentally-disordered people have not lost any parts of their soul or their basic potencies...
January 1, 2018: History of Psychiatry
Peter-Ben Smit
This article applies the theoretical framework of 'ritual failure', a sub-discipline of ritual criticism, to Paul's discussion of circumcision in his letter to the Galatians, Philippians and Romans. It is argued that the application of this theoretical perspective clarifies the dynamics at stake and provides a new way of understanding the development in Paul's position regarding circumcision. There is movement from an attitude of strong propagation, by way of indifference and a subsequent attitude of rejection, to one of modified reintegration into Paul's thinking...
September 2017: J Study New Testam
Molly J Shaughnessy
Shame is a universal living experience that is just beginning to be explored within the discipline of nursing. Development of a broad understanding of shame is needed to aid nurse researchers in clarifying this phenomenon from a nursing perspective. Pursuant to this goal, the author in this article reviews the extant literature on shame from the disciplines of nursing, psychology, sociology, philosophy, and theology. Three themes that emerged from the scholarly literature were (a) shame propels miring in paralysis, (b) shame captures the illusionary seen-unseen, and...
January 2018: Nursing Science Quarterly
Terri Daniel
This paper explores the relationship between embedded theological assumptions and the ways in which one copes with loss and bereavement. Based on James Fowler's research on Stages of Faith Development, the paper examines common Western psycho-spiritual beliefs related to loss, trauma, and grief, and proposes that profound loss experiences have the potential to lead the griever to a shift in theological thinking. It addresses the ways in which a "crisis of faith" triggered by loss or trauma prompts the questioning of closely-held beliefs, which can lead to an expanded spiritual perspective that can be beneficial to the healing process...
December 2017: Journal of Pastoral Care & Counseling: JPCC
Tim Theologis
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2018: Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology
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