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motoric skills

Ruben Posada-Gómez, Roberto A Montaño-Murillo, Albino Martínez-Sibaja, Giner Alor-Hernández, Alberto A Aguilar-Lasserre, Miriam C Reyes-Fernández
PURPOSE: One of the most important aspects in neuromotor rehabilitation is the need of feedback for patients. The rehabilitation system's efficiency relies on the therapist's judgment, who tells the patient whether he/she is performing the exercises correctly. This process may be quite subjective, because it depends on the therapist's personal opinion. On the other hand, recent studies have shown that vibrotactile biofeedback can improve the effectiveness of interaction as it is a very helpful tool in the physiological process of neuromotor rehabilitation...
October 24, 2016: Rehabilitation Nursing: the Official Journal of the Association of Rehabilitation Nurses
Alberto Cacciola, Demetrio Milardi, Alessandro Calamuneri, Lilla Bonanno, Silvia Marino, Pietro Ciolli, Margherita Russo, Daniele Bruschetta, Antonio Duca, Fabio Trimarchi, Angelo Quartarone, Giuseppe Anastasi
According to the classical view, the cerebellum has long been confined to motor control physiology; however, it has now become evident that it exerts several non-somatic features other than the coordination of movement and is engaged also in the regulation of cognition and emotion. In a previous diffusion-weighted imaging-constrained spherical deconvolution (CSD) tractography study, we demonstrated the existence of a direct cerebellum-hippocampal pathway, thus reinforcing the hypothesis of the cerebellar role in non-motor domains...
October 24, 2016: Cerebellum
Fatemeh Ostadan, Carla Centeno, Jean-Felix Daloze, Mira Jesper Frenn Lundbye-Jensen, Marc Roig
A single bout of cardiovascular exercise performed immediately after practicing a motor task improves the long-term retention of the skill through an optimization of memory consolidation. However, the specific brain mechanisms underlying the effects of acute cardiovascular exercise on procedural memory are poorly understood. We sought to determine if a single bout of exercise modifies corticospinal excitability (CSE) during the early stages of memory consolidation. In addition, we investigated if changes in CSE are associated with exercise-induced off-line gains in procedural memory...
October 20, 2016: Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
Kinga Sałat, Adrian Podkowa, Natalia Malikowska, Felix Kern, Jörg Pabel, Ewelina Wojcieszak, Katarzyna Kulig, Klaus T Wanner, Beata Strach, Elżbieta Wyska
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Since GABAergic dysfunction underlies a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders, numerous strategies leading to the augmentation of GABAergic neurotransmission have been introduced. One of them is the inhibition of GABA reuptake from the synaptic cleft mediated by four plasma membrane GABA transporters (GAT1-4). GAT1 which is exclusively expressed in the brain is an interesting target for centrally acting drugs. In this research, pharmacological properties of a novel, highly potent and selective inhibitor of GAT1, the guvacine derivative named DDPM-2571, were assessed in vivo...
October 19, 2016: Neuropharmacology
Igor Prpić, Ana Milardović, Inge Vlašić-Cicvarić, Zdravko Špiric, Jelena Radić Nišević, Petar Vukelić, Janja Snoj Tratnik, Darja Mazej, Milena Horvat
OBJECTIVES: To compare motor, cognitive and language characteristics in children aged 18 months who were prenatally exposed to low-level methyl-mercury (MeHg), and to analyze the eventual differences in these characteristics in relation to cord blood THg concentration. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The total number of 205 child-mother pairs was included in the study, and total cord blood mercury was measured in 198 of them. Out of the 198 already measured samples, 47 of them have also been tested for methyl-mercury in cord blood...
October 19, 2016: Environmental Research
Johann Issartel, Bronagh McGrane, Richard Fletcher, Wesley O'Brien, Danielle Powell, Sarahjane Belton
OBJECTIVES: This study proposes an extension of a widely used test evaluating fundamental movement skills proficiency to an adolescent population, with a specific emphasis on validity and reliability for this older age group. DESIGN: Cross-sectional observational study. METHODS: A total of 844 participants (n=456 male, 12.03±0.49) participated in this study. The 12 fundamental movement skills of the TGMD-2 were assessed. Inter-rater reliability was examined to ensure a minimum of 95% consistency between coders...
October 8, 2016: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport
Swetha Krishnaswamy, Daniel J Coletti, Hilary Berlin, Kathleen Friel
OBJECTIVE: This investigation was a pilot feasibility trial evaluating the use of an arm-weight-supported training device to improve upper-extremity function in children with hemiplegia. METHOD: A single-group within-subject design was used. Participants were 6 children ages 7-17 yr with upper-extremity weakness secondary to hemiplegia. The intervention consisted of 15-18 treatment sessions using an arm-weight-supported training device with the affected upper extremity...
November 2016: American Journal of Occupational Therapy: Official Publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association
Salome Kornfeld, Martina Studer, Stephanie Winkelbeiner, Mária Regényi, Eugen Boltshauser, Maja Steinlin
AIM: Paediatric arterial ischaemic stroke can lead to reduced quality of life (QoL). It is important to identify predictors of QoL to support recovery. We examined long-term QoL after arterial ischaemic stroke concerning different variables. METHOD: Children registered in the Swiss Neuropediatric Stroke Registry and suffering from arterial ischaemic stroke between 2000 and 2008 were included. Two years post-stroke, assessments included intelligence quotient tests for cognitive impairment and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) for neurological impairment; 5 years post-stroke, the Kidscreen-27 was used for QoL, DSM-IV criteria screening was used for attention deficits, and the ABILHAND-Kids was used for manual motor skills...
October 21, 2016: Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology
Michał Bronikowski, Małgorzata Bronikowska, Beata Pluta, Janusz Maciaszek, Maciej Tomczak, Agata Glapa
The promotion of physical activity (PA) in children and their parents requires effective planning and sometimes even interventions. This study shows the effect of PA during a 15-week intervention program "Junior for Seniors" by applying a socioecological model to the interpretation of the data. This comprehensive approach emphasizes the fact that health promotion should focus not only on intrapersonal factors but also on the multilevel factors that might be determinants and modulators of increased PA. In 2015, 24 children ("juniors," 14 girls and 10 boys, aged M = 7...
2016: BioMed Research International
Daniel DAS Virgens Chagas, Joyce Ferreira Carvalho, Luiz Alberto Batista
The main aim of this study was to analyze the joint association of body fat percentage and physical activity levels on motor coordination scores in girls with different adiposity status. Sixty-eight school-aged children between 12 and 14 years participated in the study. Skinfold thickness was measured and the Körperkoordinationstest für Kinder test was administered. Participants completed a self-reporting questionnaire on physical activity. Children's adiposity status was attributed in according to age-specific cutoff points of a Brazilian database...
2016: International Journal of Exercise Science
John Cairney, Scott Veldhuizen, Sara King-Dowling, Brent E Faught, John Hay
OBJECTIVES: Previous research has shown children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) have lower cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) than typically developing (TD) children. This has been hypothesized to be due to an activity deficit, whereby poor motor functioning discourages children from participating in physical activities, but this hypothesis has not been directly tested. In this study, we use longitudinal data to measure the extent to which physical activity explains differences in CRF between children with and without motor coordination deficits...
September 29, 2016: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport
Federico Montagnani, Marco Controzzi, Christian Cipriani
The human hand is a complex integrated system with motor and sensory components that provides individuals with high functionality and elegant behaviour. In direct connection with the brain, the hand is capable of performing countless actions ranging from fine digit manipulation to the handling of heavy objects. However the question of which movements mostly contribute to the manipulation skills of the hand, and thus should be included in prosthetic hands, is yet to be answered. Building from our previous work, and assuming that a hand with independent long fingers allowed performance comparable to a hand with coupled fingers, here we explored the actual contribution of independent fingers while performing activities of daily living using custom built orthoses...
October 19, 2016: Scientific Reports
Sylvie Chokron, Gordon N Dutton
Cerebral visual impairment (CVI) has become the primary cause of visual impairment and blindness in children in industrialized countries. Its prevalence has increased sharply, due to increased survival rates of children who sustain severe neurological conditions during the perinatal period. Improved diagnosis has probably contributed to this increase. As in adults, the nature and severity of CVI in children relate to the cause, location and extent of damage to the brain. In the present paper, we define CVI and how this impacts on visual function...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
Rebecca M Stanley, Rachel A Jones, Dylan P Cliff, Stewart G Trost, Donna Berthelsen, Jo Salmon, Marijka Batterham, Simon Eckermann, John J Reilly, Ngiare Brown, Karen J Mickle, Steven J Howard, Trina Hinkley, Xanne Janssen, Paul Chandler, Penny Cross, Fay Gowers, Anthony D Okely
BACKGROUND: Participation in regular physical activity (PA) during the early years helps children achieve healthy body weight and can substantially improve motor development, bone health, psychosocial health and cognitive development. Despite common assumptions that young children are naturally active, evidence shows that they are insufficiently active for health and developmental benefits. Exploring strategies to increase physical activity in young children is a public health and research priority...
October 19, 2016: BMC Public Health
Emma Sumner, Samuel B Hutton, Gustav Kuhn, Elisabeth L Hill
Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) fail to acquire adequate motor skill, yet surprisingly little is known about the oculomotor system in DCD. Successful completion of motor tasks is supported by accurate visual feedback. The purpose of this study was to determine whether any oculomotor differences can distinguish between children with and without a motor impairment. Using eye tracking technology, visual fixation, smooth pursuit, and pro- and anti-saccade performance were assessed in 77 children that formed three groups: children with DCD (aged 7-10), chronologically age (CA) matched peers, and a motor-match (MM) group (aged 4-7)...
October 17, 2016: Developmental Science
Geert-Jan Will, Eveline A Crone, Pol A C van Lier, Berna Güroğlu
Childhood peer acceptance is associated with high levels of prosocial behavior and advanced perspective taking skills. Yet, the neurobiological mechanisms underlying these associations have not been studied. This functional magnetic resonance imaging study examined the neural correlates of sharing decisions in a group of adolescents who had a stable accepted status (n = 27) and a group who had a chronic rejected status (n = 19) across six elementary school grades. Both groups of adolescents played three allocation games in which they could share money with strangers with varying costs and profits to them and the other person...
October 17, 2016: Developmental Science
Julie Case, Maria I Grigos
Purpose: Articulatory control and speech production accuracy were examined in children with childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) and typically developing (TD) controls within a novel word-learning task to better understand the influence of planning and programming deficits in the production of unfamiliar words. Method: Participants included 16 children between the ages of 5 and 6 years (8 CAS, 8 TD). Short- and long-term changes in lip and jaw movement, consonant and vowel accuracy, and token-to-token consistency were measured for 2 novel words that differed in articulatory complexity...
October 17, 2016: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research: JSLHR
T George Hornby, Jennifer L Moore, Linda Lovell, Elliot J Roth
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Research findings from the fields of motor learning and exercise physiology suggest specific training parameters that can be manipulated during physical rehabilitation profoundly influence skilled task performance. This review details the rationale for some of these training variables and their application in selected intervention studies focused on improving walking function in patients poststroke. RECENT FINDINGS: Basic and applied studies have shown that the amount, intensity, and variability of specific task practice applied during rehabilitation interventions can affect recovery of walking poststroke...
October 19, 2016: Current Opinion in Neurology
Gordon D Logan, Jana E Ulrich, Dakota R B Lindsey
Fine motor skills like typing involve a mapping problem that trades Fitts' law against Hick's law. Eight fingers have to be mapped onto 26 keys. Movement time increases with distance, so Fitts' law is optimized by recruiting more fingers. Choice difficulty increases with the number of alternatives, so Hick's law is optimized by recruiting fewer fingers. The effect of the number of alternatives decreases with consistent practice, so skilled typists achieve a balance between Fitts' law and Hick's law through learning...
October 17, 2016: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
Katharina Zinke, Ines Wilhelm, Müge Bayramoglu, Susanne Klein, Jan Born
Sleep is considered to support the formation of skill memory. In juvenile but not adult song birds learning a tutor's song, a stronger initial deterioration of song performance over night-sleep predicts better song performance in the long run. This and similar observations have stimulated the view of sleep supporting skill formation during development in an unsupervised off-line learning process that, in the absence of external feedback, can initially also enhance inaccuracies in skill performance. Here we explored whether in children learning a motor sequence task, as in song-learning juvenile birds, changes across sleep after initial practice predict performance levels achieved in the long run...
October 16, 2016: Developmental Science
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