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Narrative medicine

Sedigheh Asgary, Mahtab Keshvari, Amirhossein Sahebkar, Nizal Sarrafzadegan
BACKGROUND: Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) is a polyphenol-rich fruit with diverse medicinal properties. Several lines of experimental and clinical evidence have shown that pomegranate intake helps lowering blood pressure (BP) through different mechanisms. AIMS: This study aimed to present a narrative review on the anti-hypertensive properties of different parts of pomegranate such as pomegranate juice (PJ), pomegranate peels (PP), pomegranate seed oil (PSO), pomegranate fruit extract (PFE) and the mechanisms and phytochemicals responsible for these effects...
October 10, 2016: Current Pharmaceutical Design
Amy O'Donnell, Catherine McParlin, Stephen C Robson, Fiona Beyer, Eoin Moloney, Andrew Bryant, Jennifer Bradley, Colin Muirhead, Catherine Nelson-Piercy, Dorothy Newbury-Birch, Justine Norman, Emma Simpson, Brian Swallow, Laura Yates, Luke Vale
BACKGROUND: Nausea and vomiting in pregnancy (NVP) affects up to 85% of all women during pregnancy, but for the majority self-management suffices. For the remainder, symptoms are more severe and the most severe form of NVP - hyperemesis gravidarum (HG) - affects 0.3-1.0% of pregnant women. There is no widely accepted point at which NVP becomes HG. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to determine the relative clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of treatments for NVP and HG...
October 2016: Health Technology Assessment: HTA
Junxin Li, Binbin Yang, Miranda Varrasse, Kun Li
The objective of this study is to synthesize and evaluate the current body of sleep research among long-term care (LTC) residents in China and provide insights for future research. Systematic searches identified 15 studies that examined sleep in LTC residents in China. Sleep disturbances and poor sleep quality were prevalent in Chinese LTC residents. Eight cross-sectional studies reported that demographics, comorbidities, lifestyle, and environment were associated with sleep quality in Chinese LTC residents...
October 10, 2016: Clinical Nursing Research
Maria Claudia Rodríguez, Perla Villamor, Tatiana Castillo
INTRODUCTION: Pain is a disease by itself and it's a public health concern of major implication in children, not just because of the emotional component of the child and his family, but also due to the potential morbidity and mortality involving it. A proper assessment of pain it's a challenge in the pediatric population, due to their lack of understanding and verbalization of hurt. Additionally, a satisfactory treatment of pediatric pain can be arduous due to a lack of clinical knowledge, insufficient pediatric research, and the fear to opioid side effects and addiction...
November 2016: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
Michal Elboim-Gabyzon, Osnat Atun-Einy, Insaf Khoury-Assaf
PURPOSE: To review the literature on the existent evidence considering the use of power wheel chair (PWC) for children with DMD who can still walk independently. METHODS: A systematic literature search was conducted through nine databases by the three authors independently. Both quantitative and qualitative research designs were considered for inclusion. Studies were included only if the study population consisted of ambulatory children diagnosed with DMD. Data extraction was on participant characteristics, level of walking and on outcomes in term of impairment, function and participation domains (ICF, World Health Organization, 2001) in accordance to a structured diagram by the three authors independently...
October 9, 2016: Disability and Rehabilitation
Victor M Montori, Marleen Kunneman, Ian Hargraves, Juan Pablo Brito
In this narrative review, we locate within the tradition of great diagnosticians in internal medicine, a fundamental development in patient-centered care: shared decision making (SDM). In this way, we present SDM as a core component of the clinical method, one in which diagnosis of the situation and of the actions that resolve it is essential toward the practice of evidence-based medicine.
October 3, 2016: European Journal of Internal Medicine
Varley Dias Sousa, Pedro I Ramalho, Dâmaris Silveira
Regulatory transparency is an imperative characteristic of a reliable National Regulatory Authority. In the region of the Americas, the process of building an open government is still fragile and fragmented across various Health Regulatory Agencies (HRAs) and Regional Reference Authorities (RRAs). This study assessed the transparency status of RRAs, focusing on various medicine life-cycle documents (the Medicine Dossier, Clinical Trial Report, and Inspection Report) as tools for strengthening health systems...
May 2016: Revista Panamericana de Salud Pública, Pan American Journal of Public Health
Joanne Jacobson
This piece returns to the writer's memoir essays about her mother's chronic lung disease to examine the relationship between the act of caregiving and the act of writing. In arguing for important differences between the clinical, healing imperatives of narrative medicine and the primacy for the writer of self-reflection, personal need and career, the essay demonstrates how writing remains in many ways at odds with the obligations and the hopes of caregiving. At the same time, the essay argues that writing her mother's stories of illness holds the potential for both honor and mutuality-and can, in fact, constitute a form of caregiving...
October 5, 2016: Journal of Medical Humanities
Marta Rzadkiewicz, Ola Bråtas, Geir Arild Espnes
The present paper is a narrative review focusing on the psychological impact, identification of protective factors, and interventions minimizing the psychological burdens of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The research reviews studies on neurocognitive functions, personality, emotional problems, and health-related quality of life. This is done with regard to resources as well as activities enabling or enhancing a patient's adaptation. PubMed and PsychArticles databases were searched for relevant medical (eg, CODP, emphysema), psychopathology (eg, depression), and psychological (eg, personality) keywords, followed by hand search...
2016: International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Lesley Henderson, Simon Carter
There has been considerable interest in images of medicine in popular science fiction and in representations of doctors in television fiction. Surprisingly little attention has been paid to doctors administering space medicine in science fiction. This article redresses this gap. We analyse the evolving figure of 'the doctor' in different popular science fiction television series. Building upon debates within Medical Sociology, Cultural Studies and Media Studies we argue that the figure of 'the doctor' is discursively deployed to act as the moral compass at the centre of the programme narrative...
September 30, 2016: Medical Humanities
Holly Graham, Stephanie Martin
BACKGROUND: There are unequivocal health disparities, both physical and mental, between the Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples of Canada. METHODS: Utilizing narrative inquiry, 15 néhiyawak (Plains Cree people) between 18 and 71 years of age from Thunderchild First Nation were interviewed to explore what improved their mental health and well-being and what they needed to attain optimal mental health and well-being. By posing questions that focused on the positive, the strengths and resilience of the néhiyawak came to the forefront...
2016: International Journal of Mental Health Systems
Xiaoqin Liu, Yi Guan, Sheng Xu, Qingzhao Li, Yuanbo Sun, Ruijie Han, Chunyang Jiang
Accompanied with the broad application of interventional therapy, the incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) has been recently increasing in clinical renal medicine. The pathogenesis of AKI is diverse and complex. In the context of the requirements for the diagnosis and treatment of a renal disorder, a large number of studies have explored biological markers and their usefulness to the early diagnosis and treatment of AKI, including glomerular injury, renal tubular injury, and others. These biomarkers provide an important basis for early monitoring of AKI, but are still not quite sufficient...
September 28, 2016: Kidney & Blood Pressure Research
L D Hayes, N Sculthorpe, B Cunniffe, F Grace
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 27, 2016: International Journal of Sports Medicine
Clara Crunkhorn, Mieke van Driel, Van Nguyen, Treasure McGuire
AIM: This study explored consumer knowledge gaps and concerns regarding medication use in children. METHODS: Calls concerning or made by people under 18 to the pharmacist-operated, national consumer medicines call centre National Prescribing Service Medicines Line (2002 to June 2010) were analysed. Calls were classified and narratively explored by age group: <1, 1-4, 5-14 and 15-17 years. Consumer Medication Information (CMI) and evidence-based resources were examined to determine information concordance for common questions...
September 23, 2016: Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health
Abigail Ford Winkel, Nathalie Feldman, Haley Moss, Holli Jakalow, Julia Simon, Stephanie Blank
OBJECTIVE: To determine whether a workshop Narrative Medicine curriculum can improve burnout among obstetrics and gynecology residents. METHODS: A Narrative Medicine curriculum was conducted at three obstetrics and gynecology training programs. An explanatory research design examined correlation between Narrative Medicine attendance and changes in survey responses. Residents completed a pretest and 1-year posttest survey that included validated measures of burnout and empathy...
October 2016: Obstetrics and Gynecology
Christian J Wiedermann
Ethical standards in the context of scientific publications are increasingly gaining attention. A narrative review of the literature concerning publication ethics was conducted as found in PubMed, Google Scholar, relevant news articles, position papers, websites and other sources. The Committee on Publication Ethics has produced guidelines and schedules for the handling of problem situations that have been adopted by professional journals and publishers worldwide as guidelines to authors. The defined requirements go beyond the disclosure of conflicts of interest or the prior registration of clinical trials...
August 4, 2016: World Journal of Critical Care Medicine
Jocelyn Lim Chua
The unprecedented reliance today on psychiatric drugs to maintain mission readiness in war and to treat veterans at home has been the subject of ethical debate in the United States. While acknowledging these debates, I advocate for an ethnography of how US soldiers and veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars themselves articulate political and ethical tensions in their experiences of psychiatric drug treatment. Detailing one army veteran's interpretations of drug effects as narrated through the lens of his current antiwar politics, I examine the radicalizing transformations of self and subjectivity that he attributes both to his witnessing drug use in Iraq and to the neurochemical effects of his own medications...
September 20, 2016: Medical Anthropology
Luca Valera, María Teresa Russo, Giuseppe Curcio
More and more seems to be necessary to find new ways of communication between medical doctors and bioethicists in order to build a shared vocabulary and to prevent conflicts: many bioethical problems seem to be caused by the lack of dialogue between them, which both seem to speak two different languages. Improving this dialogue means searching new languages and innovative forms of communication: the narration could be a really effective tool to enhance the physicians' and bioethicist's moral conscience, since it facilitates reasoning on someone's particular experience, and, ultimately, on our experience...
May 2016: Cuadernos de Bioética: Revista Oficial de la Asociación Española de Bioética y Ética Médica
Peter Paal, Les Gordon, Giacomo Strapazzon, Monika Brodmann Maeder, Gabriel Putzer, Beat Walpoth, Michael Wanscher, Doug Brown, Michael Holzer, Gregor Broessner, Hermann Brugger
BACKGROUND: This paper provides an up-to-date review of the management and outcome of accidental hypothermia patients with and without cardiac arrest. METHODS: The authors reviewed the relevant literature in their specialist field. Summaries were merged, discussed and approved to produce this narrative review. RESULTS: The hospital use of minimally-invasive rewarming for non-arrested, otherwise healthy, patients with primary hypothermia and stable vital signs has the potential to substantially decrease morbidity and mortality for these patients...
September 15, 2016: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
Jo Marie Reilly
This commentary reflects the professional life story of a prolific and well-published poet, Howard Stein. An anthropologist by training, Howard's poetry is well known and well respected by family physicians. It is within family medicine that Howard found his professional home, and in his 45-plus-year career he has shared the value of "patient story"; the value of the doctor-patient relationship; and the art of listening deeply to self, colleagues, and patients. This commentary offers a tribute to Howard's professional life and his contributions to family and narrative medicine...
September 2016: Families, Systems & Health: the Journal of Collaborative Family Healthcare
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