keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28209305/initial-vasodilatation-in-a-child-with-reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome
#1
Yoshitsugu Oikawa, Yukimune Okubo, Yurika Numata-Uematsu, Yu Aihara, Taro Kitamura, Masaru Takayanagi, Yukitoshi Takahashi, Shigeo Kure, Mitsugu Uematsu
We describe the case of a 10-year-old boy who developed reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) after cerebellitis. He received intravenous immunoglobulin and methylprednisolone to treat the cerebellitis. However, he then presented with a sudden severe headache, vomiting, and generalized tonic-clonic seizure. Brain magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) initially revealed diffuse cerebral vasodilatations, and diffuse multifocal segmental vasoconstrictions developed several days later. His clinical symptoms gradually resolved after several days, in the absence of any specific therapy...
February 10, 2017: Journal of Clinical Neuroscience: Official Journal of the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28203185/reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome-with-intracranial-hypertension-should-decompressive-craniectomy-be-considered
#2
Ségolène Mrozek, Laurent Lonjaret, Aude Jaffre, Anne-Christine Januel, Nicolas Raposo, Sergio Boetto, Jean-François Albucher, Olivier Fourcade, Thomas Geeraerts
BACKGROUND: Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is a rare cause of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) causing intracranial hypertension. METHODS: Case report. RESULTS: We report a case of RCVS-related ICH leading to refractory intracranial hypertension. A decompressive craniectomy was performed to control intracranial pressure. We discuss here the management of RCVS with intracranial hypertension. Decompressive craniectomy was preformed to avoid the risky option of high cerebral perfusion pressure management with the risk of bleeding, hemorrhagic complications, and high doses of norepinephrine...
January 2017: Case Reports in Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28195428/blood-brain-barrier-breakdown-in-reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome-implications-for-pathophysiology-and-diagnosis
#3
Mi Ji Lee, Jihoon Cha, Hyun Ah Choi, Sook-Young Woo, Seonwoo Kim, Shuu-Jiun Wang, Chin-Sang Chung
OBJECTIVE: Diagnosis of reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is currently based on luminographic findings of vasoconstriction. In addition to vasoconstriction, the blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown has been postulated as a central mechanism of RCVS. Our aim was to document BBB breakdown in patients with RCVS and its role for the pathophysiology-based diagnosis of RCVS. METHODS: We prospectively recruited 72 consecutive patients with thunderclap headache who did not have aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage from April 2015 to July 2016 at the Samsung Medical Center...
February 13, 2017: Annals of Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28190440/neurologic-complications-in-critically-ill-pregnant-patients
#4
W L Wright
Neurologic complications in a critically ill pregnant woman are uncommon but some of the complications (such as eclampsia) are unique to pregnancy and the puerperal period. Other neurologic complications (such as seizures in the setting of epilepsy) may worsen during pregnancy. Clinical signs and symptoms such as seizure, headache, weakness, focal neurologic deficits, and decreased level of consciousness require careful consideration of potential causes to ensure prompt treatment measures are instituted to prevent ongoing neurologic injury...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28157751/inherited-and-uncommon-causes-of-stroke
#5
Jennifer Juhl Majersik
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This article is a practical guide to identifying uncommon causes of stroke and offers guidance for evaluation and management, even when large controlled trials are lacking in these rarer forms of stroke. RECENT FINDINGS: Fabry disease causes early-onset stroke, particularly of the vertebrobasilar system; enzyme replacement therapy should be considered in affected patients. Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), often misdiagnosed as multiple sclerosis, causes migraines, early-onset lacunar strokes, and dementia...
February 2017: Continuum: Lifelong Learning in Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28087351/central-nervous-system-vasculitis-in-adults-an-update
#6
REVIEW
Lívia Almeida Dutra, Alexandre Wagner Silva de Souza, Gabriela Grinberg-Dias, Orlando Graziani Povoas Barsottini, Simone Appenzeller
Primary central nervous system vasculitis (PCNSV) is a challenging diagnosis due to broad clinical manifestations and variable specificity and sensitivity of laboratory and imaging diagnostic tools. Differential diagnosis includes reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS), secondary vasculitis of the CNS and other noninflammatory vasculopathies. Brain biopsy is essential for definitive diagnosis and to exclude mimickers. Recent data show that data large-vessel PCNSV present worse prognosis when compared to small-vessel PCNSV...
February 2017: Autoimmunity Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28038897/herbal-supplements-association-with-reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome-a-case-report
#7
Isabel Costa, Marcelo D Mendonça, Vera Cruz E Silva, Sofia Calado, Miguel Viana-Baptista
BACKGROUND: Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is a clinico-radiologic syndrome characterized by thunderclap headache and reversible multifocal arterial constrictions that resolves within 3 months. RCVS can be either spontaneous or related to a trigger; vasoactive drugs including over-the-counter medicine are common culprits. Nevertheless, there are sparse data on the association of herbal supplements in the genesis of unexplained RCVS. METHODS: We describe a case of RCVS with a temporal association with the consumption of a diet pill composed of green tea, L-carnitine, and conjugated linoleic acid...
December 27, 2016: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases: the Official Journal of National Stroke Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28028148/strokes-associated-with-pregnancy-and-puerperium-a-nationwide-study-by-the-japan-stroke-society
#8
Kazumichi Yoshida, Jun C Takahashi, Yohei Takenobu, Norihiro Suzuki, Akira Ogawa, Susumu Miyamoto
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The incidence and cause of strokes associated with pregnancy and the puerperium are still not fully understood. The aim of this study was to characterize pregnancy-related strokes in Japan using a large-scale survey with current imaging techniques. METHODS: A retrospective analysis was conducted based on clinical chart reviews in 736 stroke teaching hospitals certified by the Japan Stroke Society between 2012 and 2013, using a web-based questionnaire requesting the detailed clinical course without any personally identifying information...
December 27, 2016: Stroke; a Journal of Cerebral Circulation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27994838/reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome-promptly-diagnosed-with-magnetic-resonance-imaging-including-magnetic-resonance-angiography-during-immunosuppressive-therapy-in-a-16-year-old-girl-with-refractory-cytopenia-of-childhood
#9
Hideaki Ueki, Yasushi Sanayama, Akiyo Miyajima, Taichiro Tsuchimochi, Shunji Igarashi, Shosuke Sunami
Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is a syndrome characterized by severe headache with segmental vasoconstriction of the cerebral arteries that resolves within 12 weeks. A 16-year-old girl with refractory cytopenia of childhood, who was receiving the immunosuppressant cyclosporine, developed severe headache and was diagnosed with RCVS using magnetic resonance imaging, including magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). MRA is a non-invasive and very effective technique for diagnosing RCVS. MRA should be performed at the onset of severe headache during immunosuppressant administration for children with hematological disorders and may prevent sequelae such as posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome or ischemic attack...
November 2, 2016: Hematology Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27988255/reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome-presenting-as-subarachnoid-hemorrhage-a-rare-cause-of-postpartum-seizure
#10
Sun Hwa Lee, Seong Jong Yun, Yoon Hee Choi
Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is a rare cerebrovascular disorder affecting large- and medium-sized arteries, occurring most commonly in young women. Thunderclap headache is the usual primary symptom; seizure is uncommon. During the postpartum period, seizure is a significant concern. The main causes of postpartum seizures are posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome and cortical venous thrombosis; RCVS-related postpartum seizure is rare. Despite its rarity, its course may be fulminant, resulting in permanent disability or death if the diagnosis is delayed and treatment is not started promptly...
December 13, 2016: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27978853/khat-a-new-precipitating-factor-for-reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome-a-case-report
#11
Harith Baharith, Amy Zarrin
BACKGROUND: Postpartum reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome is one of the rare reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndromes. The clinical presentation is usually characterized by recurrent headache, focal neurological deficit, and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction seen on cerebral angiography. CASE PRESENTATION: We report a case of a 35-year-old Yemeni woman who presented with headache and focal neurological deficits that occurred 10 days after delivery, with segmental narrowing of cerebral arteries on angiography...
December 15, 2016: Journal of Medical Case Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27940651/glucocorticoid-associated-worsening-in-reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome
#12
Aneesh B Singhal, Mehmet A Topcuoglu
OBJECTIVE: Factors predicting poor outcome in patients with the reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) have not been identified. METHODS: In this single-center retrospective study, we analyzed the clinical, brain imaging, and angiography data in 162 patients with RCVS. Univariable and multivariable regression analysis were performed to identify predictors of persistent (nontransient) clinical worsening, radiologic worsening, early angiographic progression, and poor discharge outcome (modified Rankin Scale score 4-6)...
January 17, 2017: Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27940649/avoidance-of-steroids-in-the-reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome
#13
Jerome Mawet
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 9, 2016: Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27919015/reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome-rcvs-and-headache-attributed-to-aeroplane-travel-ah-does-a-link-exist
#14
EDITORIAL
Federico Mainardi, Ferdinando Maggioni, Giorgio Zanchin
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 8, 2016: Cephalalgia: An International Journal of Headache
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27915588/reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome
#15
Michael Perdices, Geoffrey Herkes
Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is a relatively rare, non-progressive angiopathy frequently heralded by severe thunderclap headache. It is characterised by vasoconstriction of cerebral arteries which usually resolves within three months of onset. Transient focal neurological signs may occur, and persistent deficits associated with haemorrhagic comorbidities have been reported in a small percentage of individuals. In this paper we report the case of RH, a 36-year-old woman who presented at a university teaching hospital in Sydney with a clinical history and radiological evidence consistent with RCVS...
December 5, 2016: Neuropsychological Rehabilitation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27904122/triptan-induced-reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome-two-case-reports-with-a-literature-review
#16
REVIEW
Yuji Kato, Takeshi Hayashi, Satoko Mizuno, Yohsuke Horiuchi, Masayuki Ohira, Norio Tanahashi, Masaki Takao
We encountered two patients with sumatriptan-induced reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS). The present patients were taking sumatriptan for the first time because they had been tentatively diagnosed with a migraine. On reviewing the literature, we found nine other cases of triptan-induced RCVS, predominantly among women aged 30 to 40 years. RCVS has been precipitated by triptan at the first ever use, after daily use, and even with long-term use at a normal dose. Patients with acute onset of severe headache should be thoroughly evaluated, and triptan should be administered appropriately...
2016: Internal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27896904/contrast-induced-encephalopathy-following-cardiac-catheterization
#17
Roberto Spina, Neil Simon, Romesh Markus, David Wm Muller, Krishna Kathir
OBJECTIVES: To describe the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and management of contrast-induced encephalopathy (CIE) following cardiac catheterization. BACKGROUND: CIE is an acute, reversible neurological disturbance directly attributable to the intra-arterial administration of iodinated contrast medium. METHODS: The PubMed database was searched and all cases in the literature were retrieved and reviewed. RESULTS: 52 reports of CIE following cardiac catheterization were found...
November 29, 2016: Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27853083/reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome-with-transient-splenial-lesions-after-delivery
#18
Akiyuki Hiraga, Kyosuke Koide, Yuya Aotsuka, Satoshi Kuwabara
Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is characterized by segmental vasospasm and it is often accompanied by either posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome or stroke. However, other MRI abnormalities have rarely been reported. A 28-year-old woman presented with a thunderclap headache immediately after delivery; MRI showed segmental vasoconstriction and an abnormal signal in the splenium of the corpus callosum. Neuroimaging abnormalities normalized 20 days after the first examination. Only two cases of RCVS with transient splenial lesions (TSL) have so far been reported...
2016: Internal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27848124/reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome-and-posterior-reversible-encephalopathy-syndrome-associated-with-intracranial-hypotension
#19
Katharina Feil, Robert Forbrig, Franziska S Thaler, Julian Conrad, Suzette Heck, Franziska Dorn, Hans-Walter Pfister, Andreas Straube
BACKGROUND: Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) and posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) are both rare disorders. The pathophysiology of both diseases is not yet fully understood. METHODS: We report the unique case of a 19-year-old comatose woman who was brought to the ER after a series of generalized tonic-clonic seizures 6 days post peridural anesthesia for cesarean section. Vital signs and initial laboratory testing including urine analysis and drug screening were unremarkable...
November 15, 2016: Neurocritical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27836652/intracranial-vessel-wall-imaging-for-evaluation-of-steno-occlusive-diseases-and-intracranial-aneurysms
#20
REVIEW
Waleed Brinjikji, Mahmud Mossa-Basha, John Huston, Alejandro A Rabinstein, Giuseppe Lanzino, Vance T Lehman
Cerebrovascular diseases have traditionally been classified, diagnosed and managed based on their luminal characteristics. However, over the past several years, several advancements in MRI techniques have ushered in high-resolution vessel wall imaging (HR-VWI), enabling evaluation of intracranial vessel wall pathology. These advancements now allow us to differentiate diseases which have a common angiographic appearance but vastly different natural histories (i.e. moyamoya versus atherosclerosis, reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome versus vasculitis, stable versus unstable intracranial aneurysms)...
November 8, 2016: Journal of Neuroradiology. Journal de Neuroradiologie
keyword
keyword
24968
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"