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Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29903393/one-year-prognosis-of-non-traumatic-cortical-subarachnoid-haemorrhage-a-prospective-series-of-34-patients
#1
R F Galiano Blancart, G Fortea, A Pampliega Pérez, S Martí, V Parkhutik, A V Sánchez Cruz, C Soriano, D Geffner Sclarsky, M T Pérez Saldaña, N López Hernández, I Beltrán, A Lago Martín
INTRODUCTION: Cortical subarachnoid haemorrhage (cSAH) has multiple aetiologies. No prospective study has reported the long-term progression of the condition. The objective of this study is to describe the clinical and aetiological characteristics of patients with cSAH and to gain insight into prognosis. METHODS: We performed a prospective, observational, multi-centre study. Data on clinical and radiological variables were collected; during a one-year follow-up period, we recorded data on mortality, dependence, rebleeding, and the appearance of dementia...
June 11, 2018: Neurología: Publicación Oficial de la Sociedad Española de Neurología
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29868878/dynamic-changes-in-white-matter-hyperintensities-in-reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome
#2
Shih-Pin Chen, Kun-Hsien Chou, Jong-Ling Fuh, Yi-Hua Huang, Chu-Chung Huang, Jiing-Feng Lirng, Yen-Feng Wang, Ching-Po Lin, Shuu-Jiun Wang
Importance: White matter hyperintense lesions (WMHs) are highly prevalent in patients with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS); however, their characteristics and underlying pathophysiology are unclear. Objective: To investigate the spatiotemporal distribution and pathomechanisms of WMHs in patients with RCVS. Design, Setting, and Participants: We prospectively recruited patients with RCVS over a 3-year period from January 2010 through December 2012 from the headache center or emergency department of Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan, a 2947-bed national medical center...
June 4, 2018: JAMA Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29863100/-reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome-a-clinical-study-of-11-cases
#3
Makoto Takemaru, Shinichi Takeshima, Naoyuki Hara, Takahiro Himeno, Yuji Shiga, Jun Takeshita, Kazuhiro Takamatsu, Eiichi Nomura, Yutaka Shimoe, Masaru Kuriyama
This study reports eleven cases of reversible cerebral vasospasm syndrome (RCVS). Of the 11 patients, two were males and nine were females, with the average age of 47.9 ± 14.1 years. Many of these patients were young. The rates of severe, intractable and pulsative headache, generalized convulsions, and motor hemiparesis were 64%, 27%, and 36%, respectively. As complications of intracerebral lesions in the early stage of disease onset, convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage, lobar intracerebral hemorrhage, and posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome were observed in 63%, 9%, and 45% of cases, respectively...
June 1, 2018: Rinshō Shinkeigaku, Clinical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29751188/reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome-as-an-unusual-complication-of-a-dural-arteriovenous-fistula-treated-with-onyx-embolization
#4
Douglas Gonsales, Fabiano das Gracas, Roberta Santos, Pedro Aguilar-Salinas, Ricardo A Hanel
BACKGROUND: Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is a rare entity with an unknown pathophysiology. RCVS has been reported to occur more frequently in women aged 20 to 50 years. Several mechanisms have been postulated involving transient deregulation of cerebral arterial tone, small vessel endothelial dysfunction, biochemical factors, hormonal deregulation, oxidative stress, and genetic predisposition. All these mechanisms and triggers are related with sympathetic over-activation which eventually produce vasoconstriction...
May 8, 2018: World Neurosurgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29741225/prediction-of-vascular-abnormalities-on-ct-angiography-in-patients-with-acute-headache
#5
Imanda M E Alons, Ben F J Goudsmit, Korné Jellema, Marianne A A van Walderveen, Marieke J H Wermer, Ale Algra
OBJECTIVES: Patients with acute headache increasingly undergo CT-angiography (CTA) to evaluate underlying vascular causes. The aim of this study is to determine clinical and non-contrast CT (NCCT) criteria to select patients who might benefit from CTA. METHODS: We retrospectively included patients with acute headache who presented to the emergency department of an academic medical center and large regional teaching hospital and underwent NCCT and CTA. We identified factors that increased the probability of finding a vascular abnormality on CTA, performed multivariable regression analyses and determined discrimination with the c-statistic...
May 9, 2018: Brain and Behavior
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29725183/dihydroergotamine-complicating-reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome-in-status-migrainosus
#6
Naresh Mullaguri, Madihah Hepburn, Christopher Ryan Newey, Premkumar Chandrasekharan Nattanmai
Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is a clinicoradiological syndrome that occurs due to dysfunction of cerebrovascular autoregulation. It is characterized by recurrent thunderclap headache from cerebral vasoconstriction which can cause ischemic infarction, spontaneous intraparenchymal and subarachnoid hemorrhage. This syndrome can be triggered by a variety of etiologies including medications, infectious, and inflammatory conditions. The diagnosis is often delayed due to unawareness among the health-care providers and delayed neuroimaging evidence of vasoconstriction with or without ischemic and/or hemorrhagic infarction...
April 2018: Journal of Neurosciences in Rural Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29722896/cerebrospinal-fluid-findings-in-reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome-a-way-to-differentiate-from-cerebral-vasculitis
#7
Laura Kraayvanger, Peter Berlit, Philipp Albrecht, Hans-Peter Hartung, Markus Kraemer
INTRODUCTION: Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome (RCVS) is characterized by an acute onset of severe headache and multifocal segmental vasoconstriction of cerebral arteries resolving within twelve weeks. Diagnostic criteria include normal or near-normal findings in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis, especially leukocyte levels < 10/mm³. Distinguishing RCVS from primary angiitis of the central nervous system (PACNS) is essential to avoid unnecessary and sometimes unfavorable immunosuppressive treatment...
May 3, 2018: Clinical and Experimental Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29682978/orgasmic-migraine-aura-report-of-two-cases
#8
Heather Angus-Leppan, Alice Caulfield
Background Paroxysmal neurological symptoms occurring with sex cause considerable anxiety and sometimes have a serious cause. Thunderclap headache is the most well-known and requires urgent investigation at first presentation for subarachnoid haemorrhage and other significant pathologies. After exclusion of underlying causes, many prove to be primary headache associated with sexual activity. Orgasmic migraine aura without headache is not currently recognised as a clinical entity. Case reports We report two patients with acephalgic orgasmic neurological symptoms fulfilling the criteria for migraine aura...
January 1, 2018: Cephalalgia: An International Journal of Headache
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29495882/clinical-significance-of-centripetal-propagation-of-vasoconstriction-in-patients-with-reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome-a-retrospective-case-control-study
#9
Masami Shimoda, Shinri Oda, Hideaki Shigematsu, Kaori Hoshikawa, Masaaki Imai, Fuminari Komatsu, Akihiro Hirayama, Takahiro Osada
Introduction We previously reported centripetal propagation of vasoconstriction at the time of thunderclap headache remission in patients with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome. Here we examine the clinical significance of centripetal propagation of vasoconstriction. Methods Participants comprised 48 patients who underwent magnetic resonance angiography within 72 h of reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome onset and within 48 h of thunderclap headache remission. Results In 24 of the 48 patients (50%), centripetal propagation of vasoconstriction occurred on magnetic resonance angiography at the time of thunderclap headache remission...
January 1, 2018: Cephalalgia: An International Journal of Headache
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29460913/-migraine-masks-differential-diagnosis-of-acute-headache
#10
A V Sergeev
Differential diagnosis of migraine, can be difficult, especially of migraine with aura. On the one hand, some diseases can produce symptoms similar to migraine (cerebral aneurysm before rupture, reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome). On the other hand, migraine with aura and some other disorders are conditions that have common pathophysiological mechanisms (e.g., CADASIL and MELAS syndrome, antiphospholipid syndrome). Thirdly, clinical presentations of migraine are often difficult to distinguish from features of other headache conditions (migraine with aura - transient ischemic attack, migraine with visual aura - occipital epilepsy)...
2018: Zhurnal Nevrologii i Psikhiatrii Imeni S.S. Korsakova
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29446798/life-threatening-headaches-in-children-clinical-approach-and-therapeutic-options
#11
Nagma Dalvi, Lalitha Sivaswamy
Life-threatening headaches in children can present in an apoplectic manner that garners immediate medical attention, or in an insidious, more dangerous form that may go unnoticed for a relatively long period of time. The recognition of certain clinical characteristics that accompany the headache should prompt recognition and referral to an institution equipped with neuroimaging facilities, pediatric neurosurgeons, and neurologists. Thunderclap headaches, which reach a peak within a very short period of time, may be the presenting feature of conditions such as arterial dissection, venous sinus thrombosis, and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome, which can be addressed by specific pharmacological options instituted in an intensive care setting...
February 1, 2018: Pediatric Annals
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29445439/severe-reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome-in-a-postpartum-patient-treated-successfully-with-direct-instillation-of-intra-arterial-verapamil-during-cerebral-angiography
#12
M T Crockett, M Di Loreto, T J Philips
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2017: Journal of Vascular and Interventional Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29433347/neuroimaging-utilization-and-findings-in-headache-outpatients-significance-of-red-and-yellow-flags
#13
Nathan P Young, Muhamad Y Elrashidi, Paul M McKie, Jon O Ebbert
Background Neuroimaging for headache commonly exceeds published guideline recommendations and may be overutilized. Methods We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study of all outpatient community patients at Mayo Clinic Rochester who underwent a neuroimaging study for a headache indication in 2015. We assessed the neuroimaging utilization pattern, clinical application of red flags, and concordance with neuroimaging guidelines. Results We identified 190 outpatients who underwent 304 neuroimaging studies for headache...
January 1, 2018: Cephalalgia: An International Journal of Headache
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29430524/agraphia-of-the-left-hand-with-dysfunction-of-the-left-superior-parietal-region-without-callosal-lesions
#14
Ryuta Kinno, Hideaki Ohashi, Yukiko Mori, Azusa Shiromaru, Kenjiro Ono
A 28-year-old right-handed man noticed weakness in his legs, three days after an ephedrine overdose. Initial brain magnetic resonance imaging showed lesions in the parietal regions bilaterally. Computed tomography angiography showed segmental and multifocal vasoconstriction of the cerebral arteries. After treatment, clinical and radiological findings resolved, suggesting the patient had reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. However, he had residual agraphia of the left hand...
March 2018: ENeurologicalSci
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29422854/reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome-due-to-atovaquone
#15
Takahiro Makino, Ikuo Kamitsukasa, Shoichi Ito
A 72-year-old Japanese woman with rheumatoid arthritis whose activity decreased with previous treatments had recurrent thunderclap headaches during an atovaquone regimen for the treatment of pneumocystis pneumonia. The recurrent headaches disappeared after discontinuation of the drug. Brain magnetic resonance images showed multiple cerebral vasoconstrictions of cerebral arteries with vasogenic cerebral white matter edema, which diminished several weeks later. We diagnosed the patient's headaches as reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome due to atovaquone...
September 2017: Case Reports in Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29406896/fatal-reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome
#16
Amy Kunchok, Helen C Castley, Lucie Aldous, Simon H Hawke, Emma Torzillo, Geoffrey D Parker, G Michael Halmagyi
We report four fatal cases of fulminant reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome, all initially diagnosed as primary central nervous system vasculitis and treated with corticosteroids. Although reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome is usually self-limiting without permanent neurologic deficits, rarely it can be fatal and worse outcomes have been associated with corticosteroid treatment.
February 15, 2018: Journal of the Neurological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29321411/cough-headache-presenting-with-reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome-a-case-report
#17
Yuji Kato, Takeshi Hayashi, Hiroyasu Sano, Rie Kato, Norio Tanahashi, Masaki Takao
Cough headache can be a primary benign condition or secondary to underlying etiologies. We herein describe a case of a 52-year-old woman with cough headache that presented as reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS). Some cases of RCVS are caused by an aberrant sympathetic response to activities that cause an intracranial pressure surge. Therefore, cough headache should be recognized as a possible presentation of RCVS, even without thunderclap headache or neurological deficits.
January 11, 2018: Internal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29277281/yield-of-computed-tomography-ct-angiography-in-patients-with-acute-headache-normal-neurological-examination-and-normal-non-contrast-ct-a-meta-analysis
#18
Imanda M E Alons, Ben F J Goudsmit, Korne Jellema, Marianne A A van Walderveen, Marieke J H Wermer, Ale Algra
BACKGROUND: Patients with acute severe headache, normal neurological examination, and a normal noncontrast head computed tomography (NCCT) may still have subarachnoid hemorrhage, cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), cervical arterial dissection, or reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS). Computed tomography angiography (CTA) is used increasingly in the emergency department for evaluating this, but its added value remains controversial. METHODS: We retrospectively collected data on the diagnostic yield of CTA in patients with acute severe headache, normal neurological examination, and normal NCCT who received additional CTA in the acute phase in 2 secondary referral centers for vascular neurology...
April 2018: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases: the Official Journal of National Stroke Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29276569/fulminant-reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome
#19
Kushak Suchdev, Gregory Norris, Imad Zak, Wazim Mohamed, Mohammed Ibrahim
Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is increasingly being recognized as a diagnosis in patients presenting with thunderclap headaches. In the vast majority of the cases, the syndrome follows a benign course and patients recover completely without any significant therapeutic intervention. In the rarest of cases, RCVS follows a monophasic course with rapid worsening, severe neurological deficits, and poor outcomes. We present the case of a 25-year-old female who presented with headaches which were worsening over 1 week...
January 2018: Neurohospitalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29274685/reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome-an-important-and-common-cause-of-thunderclap-and-recurrent-headaches
#20
REVIEW
M T Arrigan, M K S Heran, J R Shewchuk
Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome is an intracranial vascular manifestation of a wide variety of diseases. It is the second most common cause of thunderclap headache, the most common cause of recurrent severe secondary headaches, and, in patients <60 years of age, has been reported as the commonest cause of isolated convexity subarachnoid haemorrhage. Radiologically, its key feature is vasoconstriction of the intracranial vessels, a dynamic process that is typically maximal at 2 weeks, varies in its distribution over the course of the disease, and typically resolves after 3 months...
May 2018: Clinical Radiology
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