Read by QxMD icon Read

Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome

Takahiro Aoki, Katsuyoshi Koh, Yuki Arakawa, Makiko Mori, Eiji Oguma, Ryoji Hanada
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 18, 2016: Journal of Pediatrics
Pooja Gupta, Anshu Rohatgi, Samir Patel
Post-partum angiopathy is grouped within the category of reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndromes. It is considered to be a rare but under-recognized cause of stroke especially in pregnancy. We present the case of a 24 year old female who presented with hemiparesis and seizure, and turned out to be a case of post partum angiopathy.
September 2016: Journal of the Association of Physicians of India
Taerim Kim, Shin Ahn, Chang Hwan Sohn, Dong Woo Seo, Won Young Kim
OBJECTIVE: Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is an underestimated cause of thunderclap headache that shares many characteristics with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). This fact makes the two easily confused by emergency physicians. This study evaluated the clinical manifestations, radiological features, and outcomes of patients with RCVS. METHODS: The electronic medical records of 18 patients meeting the diagnostic criteria of RCVS at our emergency department between January 2013 and December 2014 were retrospectively reviewed...
December 2015: Clin Exp Emerg Med
Makarand Kulkarni, Vinay Chauhan, Sudheer Shetty
Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is a disease characterized by thunderclap headache with severe vasospasm of middle sized vessels of circle of Willis or the extracranial circulation which spontaneously revert back. We report a middle aged female with severe headache and vasospasm of the vertebral arteries and vessels of circle of Willis causing multiple cerebral infarcts. The vasospasm resolved within 3 months.
June 2016: Journal of the Association of Physicians of India
Elisabeth B Marsh, Wendy C Ziai, Rafael H Llinas
INTRODUCTION: Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) typically affects young patients and left untreated can result in hemorrhage or ischemic stroke. Though the disorder has been well characterized in the literature, the most appropriate way to diagnose, treat, and evaluate therapeutic response remains unclear. In previous studies, transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD) has shown elevated velocities indicative of vasospasm. This imaging modality is noninvasive and inexpensive; an attractive option for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring if it is sensitive enough to detect changes in the acute setting given that RCVS often affects the distal vessels early in the course of disease...
May 2016: Case Reports in Neurology
M Trolliet, A Sevely, J-F Albucher, N Nasr, C Hachon Lecamus, K Deiva, E Cheuret
Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is characterized by thunderclap headaches with diffuse segmental constriction of cerebral arteries that resolves spontaneously within 3 months. We report on a case of a 13-year-old boy presenting with acute severe headaches, triggered by physical exertion. His past medical history was uneventful. Moderate headache persisted between exacerbations for 4 weeks. He secondarily presented with signs of intracranial hypertension. Brain magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) revealed multifocal narrowing of the cerebral arteries...
September 14, 2016: Archives de Pédiatrie: Organe Officiel de la Sociéte Française de Pédiatrie
Vance T Lehman, Waleed Brinjikji, David F Kallmes, John Huston, Giussepe Lanzino, Rabinstein A Alejandro, Ashima Makol, Mahmud Mossa-Bosha
Intracranial arterial pathology has traditionally been evaluated with luminal imaging. Recently, high-resolution vessel wall imaging (HR-VWI) with MRI has facilitated sub-millimeter evaluation of the arterial walls. This technique can help differentiate various causes of intracranial steno-occlusive disease, identify culprit atherosclerotic plaques with a recent cerebral infarct, locate vessel wall pathology in areas with minimal or no narrowing on luminal imaging, predict aneurysm stability, and identify a ruptured aneurysm when multiple aneurysms are present...
September 2, 2016: British Journal of Radiology
Jay H Levin, Jorge Benavides, Claudine Caddick, Kathleen Laurie, Janet Wilterdink, Shadi Yaghi, Brian Silver, Muhib Khan
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is a vascular headache disorder characterized by severe headaches with vasospasm of cerebral arteries. Transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TCD) has been widely applied and validated in studying vasospasm of intracranial vessels, but the role of TCD in the diagnosis and monitoring of RCVS is less well established. We sought to determine the reliability of TCD for diagnosis and monitoring of RCVS. METHODS: Patients admitted to an inpatient neurology service between 2011 and 2014 with a discharge diagnosis of RCVS were retrospectively analyzed for demographics, neuroimaging, and functional outcomes...
September 1, 2016: Rhode Island Medical Journal
Maryna Skliut, Dara G Jamieson
Pregnant women are most likely to have primary headaches, such as migraine and tension-type headaches, which can be diagnosed and treated without brain imaging. Primary headaches may even start de novo during pregnancy, especially in the first few months. However, when the headache occurs late in pregnancy or in the peripartum period, secondary causes of headaches need to be considered and evaluated by brain and/or vascular imaging, generally using magnetic resonance techniques. There is considerable overlap between the cerebrovascular complications of pregnancy, including preeclampsia/eclampsia, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS), and both hemorrhagic and ischemic strokes; although, their imaging may be distinctive...
October 2016: Current Pain and Headache Reports
Akiyuki Hiraga, Yuya Aotsuka, Kyosuke Koide, Satoshi Kuwabara
BACKGROUND: Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is characterized by segmental vasospasm. Vasoactive agents and childbirth have been reported as precipitating factors for RCVS; however, RCVS induced by altitude change or air travel has rarely been reported. CASE: We present a case of a 74-year-old woman who presented with thunderclap headache during airplane descent. Magnetic resonance angiography demonstrated segmental vasoconstriction that improved 9 days after onset...
August 12, 2016: Cephalalgia: An International Journal of Headache
Lou Grangeon, Gulden Ozel, Evelyne Guégan-Massardier, Romain Lefaucheur
Bath-related thunderclap headache (BRTH) is a rare entity, closed to reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome. It is only described in middle-aged women and mainly Asiatic ethnic origins. Role of estrogen is consequently discussed. We report here a case of a 36-year-old man, admitted for five episodes of thunderclap headaches, triggered by hot shower. This is the first male case of BRTH, opposing only a hormonal hypothesis. Furthermore, this African patient consolidates the non-exclusivity of this affection to Asian ethnic origins...
August 4, 2016: Headache
Duangnapa Roongpiboonsopit, Kannikar Kongbunkiat, Kammant Phanthumchinda
Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS), a recently recognized syndrome, is defined as an intermittent segmental vasospasm of cerebral arteries accompanied by thunderclap headache. The major complications of RCVS include ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, which may cause morbidity and mortality. It is important to detect RCVS in clinical practice because misdiagnosis may lead to inappropriate treatment. In Thailand, there are only two reported cases of RCVS, which may reflect an underdiagnosis of this syndrome...
January 2016: Journal of the Medical Association of Thailand, Chotmaihet Thangphaet
Ji Young Lee, Young Seo Kim, Hyun Young Kim, Dong Woo Park, Sang-Cheol Bae, Young-Jun Lee
We describe two cases of non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and multifocal stenosis of the intracranial arteries. The patients' histories together with magnetic resonance angiography, vessel wall imaging and transcranial Doppler (TCD) indicated that the SAH was due to vasculitis or reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS). Differential diagnosis of vasculitis and RCVS is important because the treatment strategies are different: immunosuppressants in vasculitis and calcium channel blockers in RCVS...
July 25, 2016: International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases
Álex Rovira, Cristina Auger, Antoni Rovira
Idiopathic inflammatory-demyelinating diseases (IIDDs) represent a broad spectrum of central nervous system (CNS) disorders, including monophasic, multiphasic, and progressive disorders that range from highly localized forms to multifocal or diffuse variants. In addition to the classic multiple sclerosis (MS) phenotypes, several MS variants have been described, which can be differentiated on the basis of severity, clinical course, and lesion distribution. Other forms of IIDD are now recognized as distinct entities and not MS variants, such as acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders...
2016: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
A G M Aya, B Ondze, J Ripart, P Cuvillon
The occurrence of seizures in the peripartum period is a rare but particularly challenging situation. Seizures in the peripartum period could result from three categories of conditions: first and most frequent is the exacerbation of a known pre-existing seizure disorder, mainly epilepsy. A therapeutic evaluation is needed; second is the new onset of seizures due to a non-pregnancy-related problem. An accurate diagnosis and a specific treatment are required; third is range of pregnancy-related conditions. The present review focuses on this third category, with a special attention to disorders occurring in the peripartum period...
October 2016: Anaesthesia, Critical Care & Pain Medicine
Nuri Jacoby, Ulrike Kaunzner, Marc Dinkin, Joseph Safdieh
This is a case of a 52-year-old man with a past medical history of 2 episodes of coital thunderclap headaches as well as recent cocaine, marijuana, and pseudoephedrine use, who presented with sudden, sharp, posterior headache associated with photophobia and phonophobia. His initial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of the head, and magnetic resonance venography (MRV) of the head were all normal as well as a normal lumbar puncture. Given the multiple risk factors for reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS), the patient was treated for suspected RCVS, despite the normal imaging...
July 2016: Neurohospitalist
Christina Mijalski, Katarina Dakay, Cameron Miller-Patterson, Ali Saad, Brian Silver, Muhib Khan
We describe 2 cases of reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) with refractory headache aborted by intravenous magnesium. Case 1 is a 53-year-old woman with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to RCVS presented with refractory headache and persistent vasospasm, despite aggressive treatment with calcium channel blockers (CCBs) and systemic corticosteroids. Subsequently, she experienced dramatic relief of symptoms with intravenous magnesium therapy. She continued oral maintenance therapy and remained symptom free...
July 2016: Neurohospitalist
Mehmet A Topcuoglu, Aneesh B Singhal
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To compare hemorrhagic and nonhemorrhagic reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndromes (RCVS) with a view to understand mechanisms. METHODS: This single-center retrospective study included 162 patients with RCVS. Clinical, brain imaging, and angiography data were analyzed. RESULTS: The mean age was 44±13 years, 78% women. Hemorrhages occurred in 43% including 21 patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and 62 with convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage (cSAH)...
July 2016: Stroke; a Journal of Cerebral Circulation
M Fischer, E Schmutzhard
Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome refers to a neurological disorder characterized by headache, disorders of consciousness, visual disturbances, epileptic seizures, and subcortical vasogenic edema. About two thirds of patients develop neurological symptoms, which are associated with blood pressure fluctuations. One hypothesis is that hypertensive episodes cause autoregulatory failure, and values above the upper limit of cerebral autoregulation result in a breakthrough followed by hyperperfusion and blood-brain barrier dysfunction...
June 2016: Medizinische Klinik, Intensivmedizin und Notfallmedizin
H Steven Block
Physiologic alterations during pregnancy create an environment for the occurrence of disease states that are either unique to pregnancy, occur more frequently in pregnancy, or require special management considerations that may be different from the nonpregnancy state. In the realm of cerebrovascular disease, preeclampsia, eclampsia, reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome, sources of cardiogenic embolization including peripartum cardiomyopathy, cerebral venous thrombosis, pituitary apoplexy, subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracerebral hemorrhage, and special considerations for anticoagulation during pregnancy will be discussed...
July 2016: Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"