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Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27919015/reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome-rcvs-and-headache-attributed-to-aeroplane-travel-ah-does-a-link-exist
#1
EDITORIAL
Federico Mainardi, Ferdinando Maggioni, Giorgio Zanchin
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 8, 2016: Cephalalgia: An International Journal of Headache
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27915588/reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome
#2
Michael Perdices, Geoffrey Herkes
Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is a relatively rare, non-progressive angiopathy frequently heralded by severe thunderclap headache. It is characterised by vasoconstriction of cerebral arteries which usually resolves within three months of onset. Transient focal neurological signs may occur, and persistent deficits associated with haemorrhagic comorbidities have been reported in a small percentage of individuals. In this paper we report the case of RH, a 36-year-old woman who presented at a university teaching hospital in Sydney with a clinical history and radiological evidence consistent with RCVS...
December 5, 2016: Neuropsychological Rehabilitation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27904122/triptan-induced-reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome-two-case-reports-with-a-literature-review
#3
Yuji Kato, Takeshi Hayashi, Satoko Mizuno, Yohsuke Horiuchi, Masayuki Ohira, Norio Tanahashi, Masaki Takao
We encountered two patients with sumatriptan-induced reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS). The present patients were taking sumatriptan for the first time because they had been tentatively diagnosed with a migraine. On reviewing the literature, we found nine other cases of triptan-induced RCVS, predominantly among women aged 30 to 40 years. RCVS has been precipitated by triptan at the first ever use, after daily use, and even with long-term use at a normal dose. Patients with acute onset of severe headache should be thoroughly evaluated, and triptan should be administered appropriately...
2016: Internal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27896904/contrast-induced-encephalopathy-following-cardiac-catheterization
#4
Roberto Spina, Neil Simon, Romesh Markus, David Wm Muller, Krishna Kathir
OBJECTIVES: To describe the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and management of contrast-induced encephalopathy (CIE) following cardiac catheterization. BACKGROUND: CIE is an acute, reversible neurological disturbance directly attributable to the intra-arterial administration of iodinated contrast medium. METHODS: The PubMed database was searched and all cases in the literature were retrieved and reviewed. RESULTS: 52 reports of CIE following cardiac catheterization were found...
November 29, 2016: Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27853083/reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome-with-transient-splenial-lesions-after-delivery
#5
Akiyuki Hiraga, Kyosuke Koide, Yuya Aotsuka, Satoshi Kuwabara
Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is characterized by segmental vasospasm and it is often accompanied by either posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome or stroke. However, other MRI abnormalities have rarely been reported. A 28-year-old woman presented with a thunderclap headache immediately after delivery; MRI showed segmental vasoconstriction and an abnormal signal in the splenium of the corpus callosum. Neuroimaging abnormalities normalized 20 days after the first examination. Only two cases of RCVS with transient splenial lesions (TSL) have so far been reported...
2016: Internal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27848124/reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome-and-posterior-reversible-encephalopathy-syndrome-associated-with-intracranial-hypotension
#6
Katharina Feil, Robert Forbrig, Franziska S Thaler, Julian Conrad, Suzette Heck, Franziska Dorn, Hans-Walter Pfister, Andreas Straube
BACKGROUND: Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) and posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) are both rare disorders. The pathophysiology of both diseases is not yet fully understood. METHODS: We report the unique case of a 19-year-old comatose woman who was brought to the ER after a series of generalized tonic-clonic seizures 6 days post peridural anesthesia for cesarean section. Vital signs and initial laboratory testing including urine analysis and drug screening were unremarkable...
November 15, 2016: Neurocritical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27836652/intracranial-vessel-wall-imaging-for-evaluation-of-steno-occlusive-diseases-and-intracranial-aneurysms
#7
REVIEW
Waleed Brinjikji, Mahmud Mossa-Basha, John Huston, Alejandro A Rabinstein, Giuseppe Lanzino, Vance T Lehman
Cerebrovascular diseases have traditionally been classified, diagnosed and managed based on their luminal characteristics. However, over the past several years, several advancements in MRI techniques have ushered in high-resolution vessel wall imaging (HR-VWI), enabling evaluation of intracranial vessel wall pathology. These advancements now allow us to differentiate diseases which have a common angiographic appearance but vastly different natural histories (i.e. moyamoya versus atherosclerosis, reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome versus vasculitis, stable versus unstable intracranial aneurysms)...
November 8, 2016: Journal of Neuroradiology. Journal de Neuroradiologie
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27832620/-a-case-of-juvenile-cerebral-infarction-due-to-reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome
#8
Masaki Koh, Yoshifumi Tsuboi, Osamu Fukuda
A 19-year-old woman had a thunderclap headache, followed by left hemiparesis and left homonymous hemianopsia. Laboratory tests showed no signs of infection and immunological test results were unremarkable. MRI revealed a cerebral infarction in the right posterior cerebral artery territory, and digital subtraction angiography(DSA)showed right posterior cerebral artery stenosis on day 2. The first follow-up DSA demonstrated an irregular, bead-like appearance on day 9, but the stenotic lesion returned to normal on day 21...
November 2016: No Shinkei Geka. Neurological Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27819760/reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome-in-association-with-fingolimod-use
#9
Scott Belliston, Jayshree Sundararajan, Kathy Newell, Sharon Lynch
BACKGROUND: Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS), also known as Call-Fleming syndrome, is characterized by thunderclap headaches, non-aneurysmal segmental cerebral vasoconstriction seen on arteriogram, and spontaneously resolves within twelve weeks. Fingolimod has been reported to cause posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and one case of RCVS. OBJECTIVE: We report a case of RCVS possibly related to fingolimod use, and compare to cases of adverse outcomes in fingolimod use...
November 7, 2016: International Journal of Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27811235/headache-attributed-to-aeroplane-travel-and-reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome
#10
EDITORIAL
Akiyuki Hiraga, Satoshi Kuwabara
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 3, 2016: Cephalalgia: An International Journal of Headache
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27769550/reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome-during-chemotherapy-for-acute-lymphoblastic-leukemia
#11
Takahiro Aoki, Katsuyoshi Koh, Yuki Arakawa, Makiko Mori, Eiji Oguma, Ryoji Hanada
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 18, 2016: Journal of Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27762527/post-partum-angiopathy-presenting-as-ischemic-stroke
#12
Pooja Gupta, Anshu Rohatgi, Samir Patel
Post-partum angiopathy is grouped within the category of reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndromes. It is considered to be a rare but under-recognized cause of stroke especially in pregnancy. We present the case of a 24 year old female who presented with hemiparesis and seizure, and turned out to be a case of post partum angiopathy.
September 2016: Journal of the Association of Physicians of India
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27752599/reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome-at-the-emergency-department
#13
Taerim Kim, Shin Ahn, Chang Hwan Sohn, Dong Woo Seo, Won Young Kim
OBJECTIVE: Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is an underestimated cause of thunderclap headache that shares many characteristics with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). This fact makes the two easily confused by emergency physicians. This study evaluated the clinical manifestations, radiological features, and outcomes of patients with RCVS. METHODS: The electronic medical records of 18 patients meeting the diagnostic criteria of RCVS at our emergency department between January 2013 and December 2014 were retrospectively reviewed...
December 2015: Clinical and Experimental Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27739275/reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome
#14
Makarand Kulkarni, Vinay Chauhan, Sudheer Shetty
Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is a disease characterized by thunderclap headache with severe vasospasm of middle sized vessels of circle of Willis or the extracranial circulation which spontaneously revert back. We report a middle aged female with severe headache and vasospasm of the vertebral arteries and vessels of circle of Willis causing multiple cerebral infarcts. The vasospasm resolved within 3 months.
June 2016: Journal of the Association of Physicians of India
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27721780/the-need-for-a-rational-approach-to-vasoconstrictive-syndromes-transcranial-doppler-and-calcium-channel-blockade-in-reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome
#15
Elisabeth B Marsh, Wendy C Ziai, Rafael H Llinas
INTRODUCTION: Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) typically affects young patients and left untreated can result in hemorrhage or ischemic stroke. Though the disorder has been well characterized in the literature, the most appropriate way to diagnose, treat, and evaluate therapeutic response remains unclear. In previous studies, transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD) has shown elevated velocities indicative of vasospasm. This imaging modality is noninvasive and inexpensive; an attractive option for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring if it is sensitive enough to detect changes in the acute setting given that RCVS often affects the distal vessels early in the course of disease...
May 2016: Case Reports in Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27639512/-reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome-a-rare-pediatric-cause-of-thunderclap-headaches
#16
M Trolliet, A Sevely, J-F Albucher, N Nasr, C Hachon Lecamus, K Deiva, E Cheuret
Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is characterized by thunderclap headaches with diffuse segmental constriction of cerebral arteries that resolves spontaneously within 3 months. We report on a case of a 13-year-old boy presenting with acute severe headaches, triggered by physical exertion. His past medical history was uneventful. Moderate headache persisted between exacerbations for 4 weeks. He secondarily presented with signs of intracranial hypertension. Brain magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) revealed multifocal narrowing of the cerebral arteries...
September 14, 2016: Archives de Pédiatrie: Organe Officiel de la Sociéte Française de Pédiatrie
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27585640/clinical-interpretation-of-high-resolution-vessel-wall-mri-of-intracranial-arterial-diseases
#17
Vance T Lehman, Waleed Brinjikji, David F Kallmes, John Huston, Giuseppe Lanzino, Alejandro A Rabinstein, Ashima Makol, Mahmud Mossa-Bosha
Intracranial arterial pathology has traditionally been evaluated with luminal imaging. Recently, high-resolution vessel wall imaging (HR-VWI) with MRI has facilitated submillimetre evaluation of the arterial walls. This technique can help differentiate various causes of intracranial steno-occlusive disease, identify culprit atherosclerotic plaques with a recent cerebral infarct, locate vessel wall pathology in areas with minimal or no narrowing on luminal imaging, predict aneurysm stability and identify a ruptured aneurysm when multiple aneurysms are present...
November 2016: British Journal of Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27579950/transcranial-doppler-ultrasonography-as-a-non-invasive-tool-for-diagnosis-and-monitoring-of-reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome
#18
Jay H Levin, Jorge Benavides, Claudine Caddick, Kathleen Laurie, Janet Wilterdink, Shadi Yaghi, Brian Silver, Muhib Khan
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is a vascular headache disorder characterized by severe headaches with vasospasm of cerebral arteries. Transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TCD) has been widely applied and validated in studying vasospasm of intracranial vessels, but the role of TCD in the diagnosis and monitoring of RCVS is less well established. We sought to determine the reliability of TCD for diagnosis and monitoring of RCVS. METHODS: Patients admitted to an inpatient neurology service between 2011 and 2014 with a discharge diagnosis of RCVS were retrospectively analyzed for demographics, neuroimaging, and functional outcomes...
September 1, 2016: Rhode Island Medical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27562782/imaging-of-headache-in-pregnancy
#19
REVIEW
Maryna Skliut, Dara G Jamieson
Pregnant women are most likely to have primary headaches, such as migraine and tension-type headaches, which can be diagnosed and treated without brain imaging. Primary headaches may even start de novo during pregnancy, especially in the first few months. However, when the headache occurs late in pregnancy or in the peripartum period, secondary causes of headaches need to be considered and evaluated by brain and/or vascular imaging, generally using magnetic resonance techniques. There is considerable overlap between the cerebrovascular complications of pregnancy, including preeclampsia/eclampsia, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS), and both hemorrhagic and ischemic strokes; although, their imaging may be distinctive...
October 2016: Current Pain and Headache Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27521842/reversible-cerebral-vasoconstriction-syndrome-precipitated-by-airplane-descent-case-report
#20
Akiyuki Hiraga, Yuya Aotsuka, Kyosuke Koide, Satoshi Kuwabara
BACKGROUND: Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is characterized by segmental vasospasm. Vasoactive agents and childbirth have been reported as precipitating factors for RCVS; however, RCVS induced by altitude change or air travel has rarely been reported. CASE: We present a case of a 74-year-old woman who presented with thunderclap headache during airplane descent. Magnetic resonance angiography demonstrated segmental vasoconstriction that improved 9 days after onset...
August 12, 2016: Cephalalgia: An International Journal of Headache
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