keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Honey bee

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28339071/direct-interaction-between-caffeic-acid-phenethyl-ester-and-human-neutrophil-elastase-inhibits-the-growth-and-migration-of-panc-1-cells
#1
Jianhui Duan, Yilixiati Xiaokaiti, Shengjun Fan, Yan Pan, Xin Li, Xuejun Li
Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most lethal malignant tumors of the digestive system, but the mechanisms of its development and progression are unclear. Inflammation is thought to be fundamental to pancreatic cancer development and caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is an active component of honey bee resin or propolis with anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities. We investigated the inhibitory effects of CAPE on cell growth and migration induced by human neutrophil elastase (HNE) and report that HNE induced cancer cell migration at low doses and growth at higher doses...
March 21, 2017: Oncology Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28334400/a-bio-economic-case-study-of-canadian-honey-bee-hymenoptera-apidae-colonies-marker-assisted-selection-mas-in-queen-breeding-affects-beekeeper-profits
#2
Miriam Bixby, Kathy Baylis, Shelley E Hoover, Rob W Currie, Andony P Melathopoulos, Stephen F Pernal, Leonard J Foster, M Marta Guarna
Over the past decade in North America and Europe, winter losses of honey bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) colonies have increased dramatically. Scientific consensus attributes these losses to multifactorial causes including altered parasite and pathogen profiles, lack of proper nutrition due to agricultural monocultures, exposure to pesticides, management, and weather. One method to reduce colony loss and increase productivity is through selective breeding of queens to produce disease-, pathogen-, and mite-resistant stock...
March 16, 2017: Journal of Economic Entomology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28334292/the-synergistic-effects-of-almond-protection-fungicides-on-honey-bee-hymenoptera-apidae-forager-survival
#3
Adrian Fisher, Chet Coleman, Clint Hoffmann, Brad Fritz, Juliana Rangel
The honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) contributes ∼$17 billion annually to the United States economy, primarily by pollinating major agricultural crops including almond, which is completely dependent on honey bee pollination for nut set. Almond growers face constant challenges to crop productivity owing to pests and pathogens, which are often controlled with a multitude of agrochemicals. For example, fungicides are often applied in combination with other products to control fungal pathogens during almond bloom...
March 21, 2017: Journal of Economic Entomology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28334279/population-growth-of-varroa-destructor-acari-varroidae-in-colonies-of-russian-and-unselected-honey-bee-hymenoptera-apidae-stocks-as-related-to-numbers-of-foragers-with-mites
#4
Gloria DeGrandi-Hoffman, Fabiana Ahumada, Robert Danka, Mona Chambers, Emily Watkins DeJong, Geoff Hidalgo
Varroa (Varroa destructor Anderson and Trueman) is an external parasite of honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) and a leading cause of colony losses worldwide. Varroa populations can be controlled with miticides, but mite-resistant stocks such as the Russian honey bee (RHB) also are available. Russian honey bee and other mite-resistant stocks limit Varroa population growth by affecting factors that contribute to mite reproduction. However, mite population growth is not entirely due to reproduction. Numbers of foragers with mites (FWM) entering and leaving hives also affect the growth of mite populations...
March 20, 2017: Journal of Economic Entomology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28334185/ecology-life-history-and-management-of-tropilaelaps-mites
#5
Lilia I de Guzman, Geoffrey R Williams, Kitiphong Khongphinitbunjong, Panuwan Chantawannakul
Parasitic mites are the major threat to the Western honey bee, Apis mellifera L. For much of the world, Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman single-handedly inflicts unsurmountable problems to A. mellifera beekeeping. However, A. mellifera in Asia is also faced with another genus of destructive parasitic mite, Tropilaelaps. The life history of these two parasitic mites is very similar, and both have the same food requirements (i.e., hemolymph of developing brood). Hence, parasitism by Tropilaelaps spp., especially Tropilaelaps mercedesae and Tropilaelaps clareae, also results in death of immature brood or wing deformities in infested adult bees...
March 15, 2017: Journal of Economic Entomology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28334127/managed-bumble-bees-bombus-impatiens-hymenoptera-apidae-caged-with-blueberry-bushes-at-high-density-did-not-increase-fruit-set-or-fruit-weight-compared-to-open-pollination
#6
J W Campbell, J O'Brien, J H Irvin, C B Kimmel, J C Daniels, J D Ellis
Highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) is an important crop grown throughout Florida. Currently, most blueberry growers use honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) to provide pollination services for highbush blueberries even though bumble bees (Bombus spp.) have been shown to be more efficient at pollinating blueberries on a per bee basis. In general, contribution of bumble bees to the pollination of commercial highbush blueberries in Florida is unknown. Herein, we determined if managed bumble bees could contribute to highbush blueberry pollination...
February 17, 2017: Environmental Entomology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28334064/insecticide-susceptibility-in-asian-honey-bees-apis-cerana-hymenoptera-apidae-and-implications-for-wild-honey-bees-in-asia
#7
Mika Yasuda, Yoshiko Sakamoto, Koichi Goka, Teruyoshi Nagamitsu, Hisatomo Taki
To conserve local biodiversity and ensure the provision of pollination services, it is essential to understand the impact of pesticides on wild honey bees. Most studies that have investigated the effects of pesticides on honey bees have focused on the European honey bee (Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae)), which is commonly domesticated worldwide. However, the Asian honey bee (Apis cerana) is widely distributed throughout Asia, and toxicity data are lacking for this species. This study aimed to fill this important knowledge gap...
March 1, 2017: Journal of Economic Entomology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28332480/honey-bee-hairs-and-pollenkitt-are-essential-for-pollen-capture-and-removal
#8
Guillermo J Amador, Marguerite Matherne, D'Andre Waller, Megha Mathews, Stanislav N Gorb, David L Hu
While insect grooming has been observed and documented for over one hundred years, we present the first quantitative analysis of this highly dynamic process. Pollinating insects, like honey bees, purposely cover themselves with millions of pollen particles that, if left ungroomed, would make sensing and controlled flight difficult. How do they get clean? We show that the hairs on insect eyes are tuned to the pollen they collect; namely, the hairs are spaced so that they suspend pollen above the body for easy removal by the forelegs...
March 23, 2017: Bioinspiration & Biomimetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28331592/host-sharing-by-the-honey-bee-parasites-lotmaria-passim-and-nosema-ceranae
#9
Manuel Tritschler, Gina Retschnig, Orlando Yañez, Geoffrey R Williams, Peter Neumann
The trypanosome Lotmaria passim and the microsporidian Nosema ceranae are common parasites of the honey bee, Apis mellifera, intestine, but the nature of interactions between them is unknown. Here, we took advantage of naturally occurring infections and quantified infection loads of individual workers (N = 408) originating from three apiaries (four colonies per apiary) using PCR to test for interactions between these two parasites. For that purpose, we measured the frequency of single and double infections, estimated the parasite loads of single and double infections, and determined the type of correlation between both parasites in double infections...
March 2017: Ecology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28330921/linking-magnetite-in-the-abdomen-of-honey-bees-to-a-magnetoreceptive-function
#10
Veronika Lambinet, Michael E Hayden, Katharina Reigl, Surath Gomis, Gerhard Gries
Previous studies of magnetoreception in honey bees, Apis mellifera, focused on the identification of magnetic material, its formation, the location of the receptor and potential underlying sensory mechanisms, but never directly linked magnetic material to a magnetoreceptive function. In our study, we demonstrate that ferromagnetic material consistent with magnetite plays an integral role in the bees' magnetoreceptor. Subjecting lyophilized and pelletized bee tagmata to analyses by a superconducting quantum interference device generated a distinct hysteresis loop for the abdomen but not for the thorax or the head of bees, indicating the presence of ferromagnetic material in the bee abdomen...
March 29, 2017: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28328153/behavioral-transcriptomic-and-epigenetic-responses-to-social-challenge-in-honey-bees
#11
Hagai Y Shpigler, Michael C Saul, Emma E Murdoch, Amy C Cash-Ahmed, Christopher H Seward, Laura Sloofman, Sriram Chandrasekaran, Saurabh Sinha, Lisa J Stubbs, Gene E Robinson
Understanding how social experiences are represented in the brain and shape future responses is a major challenge in the study of behavior. We addressed this problem by studying behavioral, transcriptomic and epigenetic responses to intrusion in honey bees. Previous research showed that initial exposure to an intruder provokes an immediate attack; we now show that this also leads to longer-term changes in behavior in the response to a second intruder, with increases in the probability of responding aggressively and the intensity of aggression lasting two and one hours, respectively...
March 22, 2017: Genes, Brain, and Behavior
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28327890/draft-genome-of-the-honey-bee-ectoparasitic-mite-tropilaelaps-mercedesae-is-shaped-by-the-parasitic-life-history
#12
Xiaofeng Dong, Stuart D Armstrong, Dong Xia, Benjamin L Makepeace, Alistair C Darby, Tatsuhiko Kadowaki
Background: The number of managed honey bee colonies has considerably decreased in many developed countries in recent years and ectoparasitic mites are considered as major threats to honey bee colonies and health. However, their general biology remains poorly understood. Results: We sequenced the genome of Tropilaelaps mercedesae , the prevalent ectoparasitic mite infesting honey bees in Asia and predicted 15,190 protein-coding genes which were well supported by the mite transcriptomes and proteomic data...
February 22, 2017: GigaScience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28323874/c-type-allatostatins-mimic-stress-related-effects-of-alarm-pheromone-on-honey-bee-learning-and-memory-recall
#13
Elodie Urlacher, Jean-Marc Devaud, Alison R Mercer
As honey bee populations worldwide are declining there is an urgent need for a deeper understanding of stress reactivity in these important insects. Our data indicate that stress responses in bees (Apis mellifera L.) may be mediated by neuropeptides identified, on the basis of sequence similarities, as allatostatins (ASTA, ASTC and ASTCC). Effects of allatostatin injection are compared with stress-related changes in learning performance induced by the honeybee alarm pheromone, isopentylacetate (IPA). We find that bees can exhibit two markedly different responses to IPA, with opposing effects on learning behaviour and memory generalisation, and that strikingly similar responses can be elicited by allatostatins, in particular ASTCC...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28321369/developmental-and-loco-like-effects-of-a-swainsonine-induced-inhibition-of-%C3%AE-mannosidase-in-the-honey-bee-apis-mellifera
#14
Laura Wedd, Regan Ashby, Sylvain Foret, Ryszard Maleszka
BACKGROUND: Deficiencies in lysosomal a-mannosidase (LAM) activity in animals, caused either by mutations or by consuming toxic alkaloids, lead to severe phenotypic and behavioural consequences. Yet, epialleles adversely affecting LAM expression exist in the honey bee population suggesting that they might be beneficial in certain contexts and cannot be eliminated by natural selection. METHODS: We have used a combination of enzymology, molecular biology and metabolomics to characterise the catalytic properties of honey bee LAM (AmLAM) and then used an indolizidine alkaloid swainsonine to inhibit its activity in vitro and in vivo...
2017: PeerJ
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28315331/sublethal-doses-of-neonicotinoid-imidacloprid-can-interact-with-honey-bee-chemosensory-protein-1-csp1-and-inhibit-its-function
#15
Hongliang Li, Jing Tan, Xinmi Song, Fan Wu, Mingzhu Tang, Qiyun Hua, Huoqing Zheng, Fuliang Hu
As a frequently used neonicotinoid insecticide, imidacloprid can impair the chemoreceptive behavior of honey bees even at sublethal doses, while the physiochemical mechanism has not been further revealed. Here, multiple fluorescence spectra, thermodynamic method, and molecular docking were used to study the interaction and the functional inhibition of imidacloprid to the recombinant CSP1 protein in Asian honey bee, Apis cerana. The results showed that the fluorescence intensity (λem = 332 nm) of CSP1 could be significantly quenched by imidacloprid in a dynamic mode...
March 14, 2017: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28314750/octopamine-and-tyramine-modulate-the-thermoregulatory-fanning-response-in-honey-bees-apis-mellifera-l
#16
Chelsea N Cook, Colin S Brent, Michael D Breed
Biogenic amines regulate the proximate mechanisms underlying most behavior, including those that contribute to the overall success of complex societies. For honey bees, one critical set of behaviors contributing to the welfare of a colony is involved with nest thermoregulation. Worker honeybees cool the colony by performing a fanning behavior, the expression of which is largely influenced by response thresholds modulated by the social environment. Here, we examined how changes in biogenic amines affect this group-performed thermoregulatory fanning behavior in honeybees...
March 17, 2017: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28291965/stingless-bee-honey-the-natural-wound-healer-a-review
#17
Mohd Azri Abd Jalil, Abdul Razak Kasmuri, Hazrina Hadi
BACKGROUND: The stingless bee is a natural type of bee that exists in almost every continent. The honey produced by this bee has been widely used across time and space. The distinctive feature of this honey is that it is stored naturally in the pot (cerumen), thus contributing to its beneficial properties, especially in the wound healing process. METHODS: In this article, several studies on stingless bee honey that pointed out the numerous therapeutic profiles of this honey in terms of its antioxidant, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, as well as moisturizing properties are reviewed...
March 15, 2017: Skin Pharmacology and Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28289772/firewalls-in-bee-nests-survival-value-of-propolis-walls-of-wild-cape-honeybee-apis-mellifera-capensis
#18
Geoff Tribe, Jürgen Tautz, Karin Sternberg, Jenny Cullinan
The Cape bee is endemic to the winter rainfall region of South Africa where fires are an integral part of the ecology of the fynbos (heathland) vegetation. Of the 37 wild nests in pristine Peninsula Sandstone Fynbos in the Cape Point section of Table Mountain National Park that have been analyzed so far, only 22 could be accessed sufficiently to determine the existence of a propolis wall of which 68% had propolis walls which entirely enclosed their openings. The analysis of the 37 wild nests revealed that 78% occurred under boulders or in clefts within rocks, 11% in the ground, 8% in tree cavities, and 3% within shrubs...
April 2017: Die Naturwissenschaften
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28288817/animal-venoms-as-a-source-of-natural-antimicrobials-an-overview
#19
REVIEW
Ramar Perumal Samy, Bradley G Stiles, Octavio L Franco, Gautam Sethi, Lina Hk Lim
Hospitals are breeding grounds for many life-threatening bacteria worldwide. Clinically associated gram-positive bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus/methicillin-resistant S. aureus and many others increase the risk of severe mortality and morbidity. The failure of antibiotics to kill various pathogens due to bacterial resistance highlights the urgent need to develop novel, potent, and less toxic agents from natural sources against various infectious agents. Currently, several promising classes of natural molecules from snake (terrestrial and sea), scorpion, spider, honey bee and wasp venoms hold promise as rich sources of chemotherapeutics against infectious pathogens...
March 10, 2017: Biochemical Pharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28288794/stress-mediated-allee-effects-can-cause-the-sudden-collapse-of-honey-bee-colonies
#20
Ross D Booton, Yoh Iwasa, James A R Marshall, Dylan Z Childs
The recent rapid decline in global honey bee populations could have significant implications for ecological systems, economics and food security. No single cause of honey bee collapse has yet to be identified, although pesticides, mites and other pathogens have all been shown to have a sublethal effect. We present a model of a functioning bee hive and introduce external stress to investigate the impact on the regulatory processes of recruitment to the forager class, social inhibition and the laying rate of the queen...
March 10, 2017: Journal of Theoretical Biology
keyword
keyword
24915
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"