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Yi-Lei Fan, Xiao-Hong Jin, Zhong-Ping Huang, Hai-Feng Yu, Zhi-Gang Zeng, Tao Gao, Lian-Shun Feng
Tuberculosis still remains one of the most common, communicable, and leading deadliest diseases known to mankind throughout the world. Drug-resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis which threatens to worsen the global tuberculosis epidemic has caused great concern in recent years. To overcome the resistance, the development of new drugs with novel mechanisms of actions is of great importance. Imidazole-containing derivatives endow with various biological properties, and some of them demonstrated excellent anti-tubercular activity...
March 7, 2018: European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry
Matthew Dankner, April A N Rose, Shivshankari Rajkumar, Peter M Siegel, Ian R Watson
The RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK signaling cascade is among the most frequently mutated pathways in human cancer. Approximately 50% of melanoma patients possess a druggable hotspot V600E/K mutation in the BRAF protein kinase. FDA-approved combination therapies of BRAF and MEK inhibitors are available that provide survival benefits to patients with a BRAF V600 mutation. Non-V600 BRAF mutants are found in many cancers, and are more prevalent than V600 mutations in certain tumor types. For example, between 50-80% of BRAF mutations in non-small cell lung cancer and 22-30% in colorectal cancer encode for non-V600 mutants...
March 15, 2018: Oncogene
Arnaud Boyer, Eddy Pasquier, Pascale Tomasini, Joseph Ciccolini, Laurent Greillier, Nicolas Andre, Fabrice Barlesi, Celine Mascaux
Drug repurposing is the use of known drugs for new indications. Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare cancer with a poor prognosis. So far, few treatments have been approved in this disease. However, its incidence is expected to increase significantly, particularly in developing countries. Consequently, drug repurposing appears as an attractive strategy for drug development in MPM, since the known pharmacology and safety profile based on previous approvals of repurposed drugs allows for faster time-to-market for patients and lower treatment cost...
March 31, 2018: European Respiratory Review: An Official Journal of the European Respiratory Society
Thenappan Thenappan, Mark L Ormiston, John J Ryan, Stephen L Archer
Pulmonary hypertension is defined as a resting mean pulmonary artery pressure of 25 mm Hg or above. This review deals with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a type of pulmonary hypertension that primarily affects the pulmonary vasculature. In PAH, the pulmonary vasculature is dynamically obstructed by vasoconstriction, structurally obstructed by adverse vascular remodeling, and pathologically non-compliant as a result of vascular fibrosis and stiffening. Many cell types are abnormal in PAH, including vascular cells (endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts) and inflammatory cells...
March 14, 2018: BMJ: British Medical Journal
Michael A Luzuriaga, Danielle R Berry, John C Reagan, Ronald A Smaldone, Jeremiah J Gassensmith
Biodegradable polymer microneedle (MN) arrays are an emerging class of transdermal drug delivery devices that promise a painless and sanitary alternative to syringes; however, prototyping bespoke needle architectures is expensive and requires production of new master templates. Here, we present a new microfabrication technique for MNs using fused deposition modeling (FDM) 3D printing using polylactic acid, an FDA approved, renewable, biodegradable, thermoplastic material. We show how this natural degradability can be exploited to overcome a key challenge of FDM 3D printing, in particular the low resolution of these printers...
March 14, 2018: Lab on a Chip
Takudzwa J Mtisi, Charles Maponga, Tsitsi G Monera-Penduka, Tinashe Mudzviti, Dexter Chagwena, Faithful Makita-Chingombe, Robin DiFranchesco, Gene D Morse
Background: A growing number of drug development studies that include pharmacokinetic evaluations are conducted in regions lacking a specialised pharmacology laboratory. This necessitated the development of an International Pharmacology Specialty Laboratory (IPSL) in Zimbabwe. Objectives: The aim of this article is to describe the development of an IPSL in Zimbabwe. Methods: The IPSL was developed collaboratively by the University of Zimbabwe and the University at Buffalo Center for Integrated Global Biomedical Sciences...
2018: African Journal of Laboratory Medicine
Triparna Sen, Carl M Gay, Lauren Averett Byers
Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive malignancy that accounts for 14% of all lung cancer diagnoses. Despite decades of active research, treatment options for SCLC are limited and resistance to the few Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved therapies develops rapidly. With no approved targeted agents to date, new therapeutic strategies are desperately needed. SCLC is characterized by high mutation burden, ubiquitous loss of TP53 and RB1, mutually exclusive amplification of MYC family members, thereby, high genomic instability...
February 2018: Translational Lung Cancer Research
Roland B Walter
There is long-standing interest in drugs targeting the myeloid differentiation antigen CD33 in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Positive results from randomized trials with the antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) validate this approach. Partly stimulated by the success of GO, several CD33-targeted therapeutics are currently in early phase testing. Areas covered: CD33-targeted therapeutics in clinical development include Fc-engineered unconjugated antibodies (BI 836858 [mAb 33.1]), ADCs (SGN-CD33A [vadastuximab talirine], IMGN779), radioimmunoconjugates (225 Ac-lintuzumab), bi- and trispecific antibodies (AMG 330, AMG 673, AMV564, 161533 TriKE fusion protein), and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified immune effector cells...
March 13, 2018: Expert Opinion on Investigational Drugs
Joy Y Feng
Nucleoside and nucleotide analogs have played significant roles in antiviral therapies and are valued for their impressive potency and high barrier to resistance. They have been approved for treatment of herpes simplex virus-1, HIV, HBV, HCV, and influenza, and new drugs are being developed for the treatment of RSV, Ebola, coronavirus MERS, and other emerging viruses. However, this class of compounds has also experienced a high attrition rate in clinical trials due to toxicity. In this review, we discuss the utility of different biochemical and cell-based assays and provide recommendations for assessing toxicity liability before entering animal toxicity studies...
January 2018: Antiviral Chemistry & Chemotherapy
Azam Peyvandipour, Nafiseh Saberian, Adib Shafi, Michele Donato, Sorin Draghici
Motivation: Identification of novel therapeutic effects for existing U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs, drug repurposing, is an approach aimed to dramatically shorten the drug discovery process, which is costly, slow and risky. Several computational approaches use transcriptional data to find potential repurposing candidates. The main hypothesis of such approaches is that if gene expression signature of a particular drug is opposite to the gene expression signature of a disease, that drug may have a potential therapeutic effect on the disease...
March 9, 2018: Bioinformatics
Peter H Khalil, Ghazal Kabbach, Debabrata Mukherjee, Sarmad Said
Heart Failure (HF) is one of the main health care burdens in the United States and in the world. Many drugs are approved and used in practice for management of this condition; including beta blockers, diuretics, aldosterone antagonists, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI's), and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). Recently, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a drug with brand name Entresto (Sacubitril/Valsartan or LCZ696), an angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor for the use in Heart Failure with Reduced Ejection Fraction (HFrEF) patients instead of ACEI's and ARBs...
March 13, 2018: Cardiovascular & Hematological Agents in Medicinal Chemistry
Martin Everett, Nicolas Sprynski, Alicia Coelho, Jérôme Castandet, Maëlle Bayet, Juliette Bougnon, Clarisse Lozano, David T Davies, Simon Leiris, Magdalena Zalacain, Ian Morrissey, Sophie Magnet, Kirsty Holden, Peter Warn, Filomena De Luca, Jean-Denis Docquier, Marc Lemonnier
Infections caused by carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) are increasingly prevalent and have become a major worldwide threat to human health. Carbapenem resistance is driven primarily by the acquisition of β-lactamase enzymes which are able to degrade carbapenem antibiotics (hence termed carbapenemases) and can result in high levels of resistance and treatment failure. Clinically relevant carbapenemases include both serine-β-lactamases (SBLs, e.g. KPC-2 and OXA-48) and metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs), such as NDM-1...
March 12, 2018: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
Tara Castellano, Kathleen N Moore, Laura L Holman
PURPOSE: The goal of this study was to compile a review of topics pertinent to the use of immune checkpoint inhibitors in gynecologic malignancies, including foundation for use, current agents available and trials in gynecologic cancers, special populations of interest, identification and management of toxicities, and considerations in predictive biomarkers and response assessment. METHODS: A literature review of selected topics in reference to immune checkpoint inhibitors and gynecologic cancers was conducted on PubMed and the US Food and Drug Administration drug search application...
March 9, 2018: Clinical Therapeutics
I F Abou-El-Naga, D E Said, M R Gaafar, S M Ahmed, S A El-Deeb
As the current therapies for intestinal microsporidiosis are either inconsistent in their efficacies or hampered by several adverse effects, alternative antimicrosporidial agents are being sought. The present study is the first that was designed to evaluate the potency of orlistat, an approved anti-obesity drug, against intestinal microsporidiosis caused by both Enterocytozoon bieneusi and Encephalitozoon intestinalis. Results were assessed through studying fecal and intestinal spore load, intestinal histopathological changes, viability, and infectivity of spores from treated animals...
February 24, 2018: Medical Mycology: Official Publication of the International Society for Human and Animal Mycology
Hemangi Rawal, Bhoomika M Patel
The World Health Organization suggests that the cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the major cause of mortality and account for two-thirds of the deaths all over the world. These diseases kill about 17 million people every year and 3 in every 10 deaths are due to these diseases. The past decade has seen considerable improvements in diagnosis as well as treatment of various heart diseases. Various new therapeutic targets are being identified through in-depth knowledge of the disease mechanisms which has favored the testing of new strategies leading to newer treatment options...
January 1, 2018: Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeutics
D Papola, C Gastaldon, G Ostuzzi
A substantial proportion of people with mental health conditions do not adhere to prescribed pharmacological treatments. Poor adherence is probably one of the most critical elements contributing to relapse in people with schizophrenia and other severe mental disorders. In order to tackle this global issue, in November 2017 the Food and Drug Administration approved a tablet formulation of the atypical antipsychotic aripiprazole embedded with a novel digital adherence-assessment device. In this commentary, we critically appraised the potential beneficial and harmful consequences of this new digital formulation of aripiprazole, and we highlighted expected implications for clinical practice...
March 12, 2018: Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences
Maria C Sorbo, Valeria Cento, Velia C Di Maio, Anita Y M Howe, Federico Garcia, Carlo F Perno, Francesca Ceccherini-Silberstein
Nowadays, due to the development of potent Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents (DAAs) that specifically target NS3, NS5A and NS5B viral proteins, several new and highly efficacious options to treat chronic Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are available. The natural presence of resistance associated substitutions (RASs), as well as their rapid emergence during incomplete drug-pressure, are intrinsic characteristics of HCV that greatly affect treatment outcome and the chances to achieve a virolgical cure. To date, a high number of RASs in NS3, NS5A, and NS5B have been associated in vivo and/or in vitro with reduced susceptibility to DAAs, but no comprehensive RASs list is available...
February 21, 2018: Drug Resistance Updates: Reviews and Commentaries in Antimicrobial and Anticancer Chemotherapy
Kimberly Blackwell, Joseph Gligorov, Ira Jacobs, Chris Twelves
Trastuzumab improves survival outcomes for patients with HER2-positive (HER2+ ) breast cancer, yet not all such women receive this important therapy. Trastuzumab was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 1998 and the European Medicines Agency in 2000 as treatment for HER2+ metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Observational studies between 2000 and 2015 in patients with HER2+ MBC suggest that nearly 12% in the United States, 27% to 54% in Europe, and 27.1% to 49.2% in China did not receive trastuzumab or any other HER2-targeted agent as first- and/or later-line for treatment of metastatic disease...
February 2, 2018: Clinical Breast Cancer
Marta Rychert, Chris Wilkins
BACKGROUND: In July 2013 New Zealand passed the Psychoactive Substances Act (PSA) to establish the world's first regulated legal market for new psychoactive substances (NPS) ("legal highs"). AIM: To critically analyse the implementation of the PSA. METHODS: Synthesis of findings from interviews with 30 key informants (i.e. politicians, civil servants, legal high industry actors, toxicologists, NGO representatives and drug policy academics), analysis of relevant laws and policy documents, and a review of academic and grey literature on the PSA...
March 7, 2018: International Journal on Drug Policy
Lunming Liu, Weifeng Shen, Zhihui Zhu, Jinxiong Lin, Qingxia Fang, Yeping Ruan, Huajun Zhao
Fulvestrant is the FDA-approved "pure anti-estrogen" agent for malignant breast cancer therapy. But endocrine resistance causes drug failure. A new approach is desired for fulvestrant-resistant breast cancer (FRBC) therapy. This study aims to find an effective approach to inhibit FRBC for patients with advanced breast cancer. MTT assay was first performed to detect the effect of inhibitors of c-ABL (imatinib) and EGFR (lapatinib) on FRBC cells. Microarray analysis was carried out to identify microRNA which is significantly changed between parental and FRBC cells...
March 6, 2018: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
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