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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29770076/the-use-of-technology-to-improve-health-care-to-saskatchewan-s-first-nations-communities
#1
I Khan, N Ndubuka, K Stewart, V McKinney, I Mendez
Background: Saskatchewan is a province of over one million people and over 13% are Indigenous peoples, many of whom live on reserve lands. Despite continued efforts, access to health care remains a significant challenge for these Indigenous people, especially those in the North. Objective: To address this challenge, Saskatchewan's health care providers have been incorporating the use of technology for various health services. This paper describes various ways technology has been used in First Nations communities in Saskatchewan...
June 1, 2017: Canada Communicable Disease Report, Relevé des Maladies Transmissibles Au Canada
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29768456/the-hidden-costs-identification-of-indirect-costs-associated-with-acute-gastrointestinal-illness-in-an-inuit-community
#2
Nia King, Rachael Vriezen, Victoria L Edge, James Ford, Michele Wood, Sherilee Harper
BACKGROUND: Acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) incidence and per-capita healthcare expenditures are higher in some Inuit communities as compared to elsewhere in Canada. Consequently, there is a demand for strategies that will reduce the individual-level costs of AGI; this will require a comprehensive understanding of the economic costs of AGI. However, given Inuit communities' unique cultural, economic, and geographic contexts, there is a knowledge gap regarding the context-specific indirect costs of AGI borne by Inuit community members...
2018: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29764173/developing-palliative-care-programs-in-indigenous-communities-using-participatory-action-research-a-canadian-application-of-the-public-health-approach-to-palliative-care
#3
Mary Lou Kelley, Holly Prince, Shevaun Nadin, Kevin Brazil, Maxine Crow, Gaye Hanson, Luanne Maki, Lori Monture, Christopher J Mushquash, Valerie O'Brien, Jeroline Smith
BACKGROUND: The Indigenous people of Canada include First Nations, Inuit and Metis. This research focused on four diverse First Nations communities located in Ontario and Manitoba. First Nations communities have well-established culturally-based social processes for supporting their community members experiencing dying, loss, grief and bereavement. However, communities do not have formalized local palliative care (PC) programs and have limited access to medical services, especially pain and symptom management...
April 2018: Annals of Palliative Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29709293/mandibular-ramus-shape-variation-and-ontogeny-in-homo-sapiens-and-homo-neanderthalensis
#4
Claire E Terhune, Terrence B Ritzman, Chris A Robinson
As the interface between the mandible and cranium, the mandibular ramus is functionally significant and its morphology has been suggested to be informative for taxonomic and phylogenetic analyses. In primates, and particularly in great apes and humans, ramus morphology is highly variable, especially in the shape of the coronoid process and the relationship of the ramus to the alveolar margin. Here we compare ramus shape variation through ontogeny in Homo neanderthalensis to that of modern and fossil Homo sapiens using geometric morphometric analyses of two-dimensional semilandmarks and univariate measurements of ramus angulation and relative coronoid and condyle height...
April 27, 2018: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29692943/three-lifestyle-related-issues-of-major-significance-for-public-health-among-the-inuit-in-contemporary-greenland-a-review-of-adverse-childhood-conditions-obesity-and-smoking-in-a-period-of-social-transition
#5
REVIEW
Peter Bjerregaard, Christina V L Larsen
Greenland is a country in transition from a colonial past with subsistence hunting and fishing to an urban Nordic welfare state. Epidemiological transition from infectious to chronic diseases has been evident since the 1950s. Ninety percent of the population is Inuit. We studied three public health issues based on published literature, namely adverse childhood experiences, addictive behavior, and suicide; diet and obesity; and smoking. Alcohol consumption was high in the 1970s and 1980s with accompanying family and social disruption...
2018: Public Health Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29685826/inuit-country-food-diet-pattern-is-associated-with-lower-risk-of-coronary-heart-disease
#6
Xue Feng Hu, Tiff-Annie Kenny, Hing Man Chan
BACKGROUND: Inuit have experienced a rapid transition in diet and lifestyle over the past several decades, paralleled by the emergence of chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes, and hypertension. OBJECTIVE: To identify contemporary dietary patterns among Inuit and investigate their association with cardiovascular disease outcomes. DESIGN: This was an association study in a cross-sectional population health and nutrition survey. PARTICIPANTS: The participants included 1,570 adults (aged ≥18 years) from Nunavut in the International Polar Year Inuit Health Survey 2007-2008 who completed diet/health questionnaires and provided blood samples...
April 20, 2018: Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29659151/story-making-as-methodology-disrupting-dominant-stories-through-multimedia-storytelling
#7
Carla Rice, Ingrid Mündel
In this essay, we discuss multimedia story-making methodologies developed through Re•Vision: The Centre for Art and Social Justice that investigates the power of the arts, especially story, to positively influence decision makers in diverse sectors. Our story-making methodology brings together majority and minoritized creators to represent previously unattended experiences (e.g., around mind-body differences, queer sexuality, urban Indigenous identity, and Inuit cultural voice) with an aim to building understanding and shifting policies/practices that create barriers to social inclusion and justice...
April 16, 2018: Canadian Review of Sociology, Revue Canadienne de Sociologie
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29561564/smoking-correlates-among-inuit-men-and-women-in-inuit-nunangat
#8
Evelyne Bougie, Dafna E Kohen
BACKGROUND: Although rates of daily smoking among Inuit have been decreasing since 1991, Inuit are still much more likely to smoke relative to the Canadian population as a whole. However, little population-based empirical research has identified characteristics associated with cigarette use among this population. DATA AND METHODS: Based on data from the 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey, sex-specific logistic regression analyses, informed by an Inuit social determinants of health framework, described associations between current smoking and selected socio-demographic characteristics among Inuit men and women aged 18 or older who resided in Inuit Nunangat...
March 21, 2018: Health Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29554622/whole-blood-mercury-and-the-risk-of-cardiovascular-disease-among-the-greenlandic-population
#9
Trine Jul Larsen, Marit Eika Jørgensen, Christina Viskum Lytken Larsen, Inger Katrine Dahl-Petersen, Pernille Falberg Rønn, Peter Bjerregaard, Stine Byberg
BACKGROUND: Studies have found mercury to be associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD), however, primarily in populations with low exposure. The highest levels, and variations in the levels, of whole blood mercury (WBM) worldwide have been found in Greenland. We prospectively assessed the association between WBM and the risk of developing CVD in the Greenlandic population. METHODS: We assessed the effects of WBM levels on incident CVD among 3083 Greenlandic Inuit, participating in a population-based cohort study conducted from 2005 to 2010...
March 16, 2018: Environmental Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29531279/genome-wide-association-analysis-identifies-new-candidate-risk-loci-for-familial-intracranial-aneurysm-in-the-french-canadian-population
#10
Sirui Zhou, Ziv Gan-Or, Amirthagowri Ambalavanan, Dongbing Lai, Pingxing Xie, Cynthia V Bourassa, Stephanie Strong, Jay P Ross, Alexandre Dionne-Laporte, Dan Spiegelman, Nicolas Dupré, Tatiana M Foroud, Lan Xiong, Patrick A Dion, Guy A Rouleau
Intracranial Aneurysm (IA) is a common disease with a worldwide prevalence of 1-3%. In the French-Canadian (FC) population, where there is an important founder effect, the incidence of IA is higher and is frequently seen in families. In this study, we genotyped a cohort of 257 mostly familial FC IA patients and 1,992 FC controls using the Illumina NeuroX SNP-chip. The most strongly associated loci were tested in 34 Inuit IA families and in 32 FC IA patients and 106 FC controls that had been exome sequenced (WES)...
March 12, 2018: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29529040/sharing-based-social-capital-associated-with-harvest-production-and-wealth-in-the-canadian-arctic
#11
Elspeth Ready
Social institutions that facilitate sharing and redistribution may help mitigate the impact of resource shocks. In the North American Arctic, traditional food sharing may direct food to those who need it and provide a form of natural insurance against temporal variability in hunting returns within households. Here, network properties that facilitate resource flow (network size, quality, and density) are examined in a country food sharing network comprising 109 Inuit households from a village in Nunavik (Canada), using regressions to investigate the relationships between these network measures and household socioeconomic attributes...
2018: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29510000/genetic-variations-exposure-to-persistent-organic-pollutants-and-breast-cancer-risk-a-greenlandic-case-control-study
#12
Maria Wielsøe, Hans Eiberg, Mandana Ghisari, Peder Kern, Ole Lind, Eva Cecilie Bonefeld-Jørgensen
This study investigated the effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in xenobiotic and steroid hormone-metabolizing genes in relation to breast cancer risk and explored possible effect modifications on persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and breast cancer associations. The study also assessed effects of Greenlandic BRCA1 founder mutations. Greenlandic Inuit women (77 cases and 84 controls) were included. We determined two founder mutations in BRCA1: Cys39Gly (rs80357164) and 4684delCC, and five SNPs in xenobiotic and oestrogen-metabolizing genes: CYP17A1 -34T>C (rs743572), CYP19A1 *19C>T (rs10046), CYP1A1 Ile462Val (rs1048943), CYP1B Leu432Val (rs1056836) and COMT Val158Met (rs4680)...
March 6, 2018: Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29507771/tailoring-and-field-testing-the-use-of-a-knowledge-translation-peer-support-shared-decision-making-strategy-with-first-nations-inuit-and-m%C3%A3-tis-people-making-decisions-about-their-cancer-care-a-study-protocol
#13
Janet Jull, Maegan Mazereeuw, Amanada Sheppard, Alethea Kewayosh, Richard Steiner, Ian D Graham
Plain English summary: Tailoring and testing a peer support decision making strategy with First Nations, Inuit and Métis people making decisions about their cancer care: A study protocol.First Nations, Inuit and Métis (FNIM) people face higher risks for cancer compared to non-FNIM populations. They also face cultural barriers to health service use. Within non-FNIM populations an approach to health decision making, called shared decision making (SDM), has been found to improve the participation of people in their healthcare...
2018: Research Involvement and Engagement
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29498343/serum-25-hydroxyvitamin-d-calcium-and-parathyroid-hormone-levels-in-native-and-european-populations-in-greenland
#14
Stig Andersen, Paneeraq Noahsen, Karsten F Rex, Inuuteq Fleischer, Nadja Albertsen, Marit E Jørgensen, Louise K Schæbel, Mogens B Laursen
Ca homoeostasis is important to human health and tightly controlled by powerful hormonal mechanisms that display ethnic variation. Ethnic variations could occur also in Arctic populations where the traditional Inuit diet is low in Ca and sun exposure is limited. We aimed to assess factors important to parathyroid hormone (PTH) and Ca in serum in Arctic populations. We included Inuit and Caucasians aged 50-69 years living in the capital city in West or in rural East Greenland. Lifestyle factors were assessed by questionnaires...
February 2018: British Journal of Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29497573/nonoperative-treatment-of-appendicitis-during-pregnancy-in-a-remote-area
#15
Anne-Kathrine Carstens, Lise Fensby, Luit Penninga
Appendicitis is the most common nonobstetric surgical disease during pregnancy. Appendicitis during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of morbidity and perforation compared with the general population. Furthermore, it may cause preterm birth and fetal loss, and quick surgical intervention is the established treatment option in pregnant women with appendicitis. In Greenland, geographical distances are very large, and weather conditions can be extreme, and surgical care is not always immediately available...
January 2018: American Journal of Perinatology Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29492095/evaluation-of-eczema-asthma-allergic-rhinitis-and-allergies-among-the-grade-1-children-of-iqaluit
#16
Ahmed Ahmed, Amir Hakim, Allan Becker
Background: Little is known about the prevalence of asthma, allergic rhinitis, eczema and allergies among Canadian Inuit children, especially those living in the arctic and subarctic areas. Methods: A cross-sectional study among Grade 1 students attending schools in Iqaluit, the capital of Nunavut, was conducted during the 2015/2016 school year. We used the International Study of Allergy and Asthma in Children questionnaire with added questions relevant to the population...
2018: Allergy, Asthma, and Clinical Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29491724/tobacco-use-and-misuse-among-indigenous-children-and-youth-in-canada
#17
Radha Jetty
While tobacco is sacred in many Indigenous cultures, the recreational misuse of commercial tobacco is highly addictive and harmful. Tobacco misuse is the leading preventable cause of premature death in the world. Smoking rates among Canadian Indigenous youth are at least three times higher than for their non-Aboriginal peers, an alarming statistic on many levels. The tolls on health from extensive tobacco use range from disproportionately high individual mortality and morbidity to heavy socioeconomic burdens on Indigenous communities...
October 2017: Paediatrics & Child Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29483669/genetic-determinants-of-glycated-hemoglobin-levels-in-the-greenlandic-inuit-population
#18
Emil V R Appel, Ida Moltke, Marit E Jørgensen, Peter Bjerregaard, Allan Linneberg, Oluf Pedersen, Anders Albrechtsen, Torben Hansen, Niels Grarup
We previously showed that a common genetic variant leads to a remarkably increased risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in the small and historically isolated Greenlandic population. Motivated by this, we aimed at discovering novel genetic determinants for glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C ) and at estimating the effect of known HbA1C -associated loci in the Greenlandic population. We analyzed genotype data from 4049 Greenlanders generated using the Illumina Cardio-Metabochip. We performed the discovery association analysis by an additive linear mixed model...
February 26, 2018: European Journal of Human Genetics: EJHG
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29439924/canada-s-evacuation-policy-for-pregnant-first-nations-women-resignation-resilience-and-resistance
#19
Karen M Lawford, Audrey R Giles, Ivy L Bourgeault
BACKGROUND: Aboriginal peoples in Canada are comprised of First Nations, Métis, and Inuit. Health care services for First Nations who live on rural and remote reserves are mostly provided by the Government of Canada through the federal department, Health Canada. One Health Canada policy, the evacuation policy, requires all First Nations women living on rural and remote reserves to leave their communities between 36 and 38 weeks gestational age and travel to urban centres to await labour and birth...
February 10, 2018: Women and Birth: Journal of the Australian College of Midwives
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29439893/the-state-of-affairs-for-cardiovascular-health-research-in-indigenous-women-in-canada-a-scoping-review
#20
REVIEW
Stephanie A Prince, Lisa A McDonnell, Michele A Turek, Sarah Visintini, Amy Nahwegahbow, Sujane Kandasamy, Louise Y Sun, Thais Coutinho
Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death among Indigenous peoples in Canada. As rates of CVD rise, the impacts among the growing population of Indigenous women will emerge as an important health issue. The objective of this scoping review was to advance the state of knowledge about cardiovascular health research in Indigenous women in Canada. Five databases and grey literature (non-peer reviewed works) were searched to identify all studies that reported on the prevalence, pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment, or interventions for CVD among adult Indigenous women in Canada, including First Nations, Métis, and Inuit...
April 2018: Canadian Journal of Cardiology
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