Read by QxMD icon Read

Pharmacology and physiology

Jun Li, Wei Zhen, Dengkai Long, Ling Ding, Anhui Gong, Chenghong Xiao, Weike Jiang, Xiaoqing Liu, Tao Zhou, Luqi Huang
Pseudostellaria heterophylla (Miq.) Pax is a mild tonic herb widely cultivated in the Southern part of China. The tuberous roots of P. heterophylla accumulate high levels of secondary metabolism products of medicinal value such as saponins, flavonoids, and isoquinoline alkaloids. Despite numerous studies on the pharmacological importance and purification of these compounds in P. heterophylla, their biosynthesis is not well understood. In the present study, we used Illumina HiSeq 4000 sequencing platform to sequence the RNA from flowers, leaves, stem, root cortex and xylem tissues of P...
2016: PloS One
Daryl C Yang, Jennifer R Deuis, Daniel Dashevsky, James Dobson, Timothy N W Jackson, Andreas Brust, Bing Xie, Ivan Koludarov, Jordan Debono, Iwan Hendrikx, Wayne C Hodgson, Peter Josh, Amanda Nouwens, Gregory J Baillie, Timothy J C Bruxner, Paul F Alewood, Kelvin Kok Peng Lim, Nathaniel Frank, Irina Vetter, Bryan G Fry
Millions of years of evolution have fine-tuned the ability of venom peptides to rapidly incapacitate both prey and potential predators. Toxicofera reptiles are characterized by serous-secreting mandibular or maxillary glands with heightened levels of protein expression. These glands are the core anatomical components of the toxicoferan venom system, which exists in myriad points along an evolutionary continuum. Neofunctionalisation of toxins is facilitated by positive selection at functional hotspots on the ancestral protein and venom proteins have undergone dynamic diversification in helodermatid and varanid lizards as well as advanced snakes...
October 18, 2016: Toxins
Mariana Moreira Coutinho Arroja, Emma Reid, Christopher McCabe
The renin angiotensin system (RAS) consists of the systemic hormone system, critically involved in regulation and homeostasis of normal physiological functions [i.e. blood pressure (BP), blood volume regulation], and an independent brain RAS, which is involved in the regulation of many functions such as memory, central control of BP and metabolic functions. In general terms, the RAS consists of two opposing axes; the 'classical axis' mediated primarily by Angiotensin II (Ang II), and the 'alternative axis' mediated mainly by Angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-(1-7))...
2016: Experimental & Translational Stroke Medicine
Mengmeng Wang, Amanda K Kussrow, Mireia Fernandez Ocana, Jeffrey R Chabot, Christopher S Lepsy, Darryl J Bornhop, Denise M O'Hara
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: A monoclonal antibody (PF-00547659) against Mucosal Adressin Cell Adhesion Molecule (MAdCAM), expressed as both soluble (sMAdCAM) and trans-membrane (mMAdCAM) target forms, showed over 30-fold difference in antibody-target KD between in vitro (Biacore) and clinically derived (KD,in-vivo ) values. Back-scattering interferometry (BSI) was applied to acquire physiologically relevant KD values which were used to establish in vitro and in vivo correlation (IVIVC). EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH: Back-scattering interferometry (BSI) was applied to obtain KD values between PF-00547659 and recombinant human MAdCAM in buffer or CHO cells and endogenous MAdCAM in human serum or colon tissue...
October 19, 2016: British Journal of Pharmacology
Maria Rosaria Carratù, Anna Signorile, Domenico De Rasmo, Antonia Reale, Angelo Vacca
BACKGROUND: The serine-threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) regulates multiple cell signaling cascades and its inactivation by viral oncoproteins, mutation of specific structural subunits or upregulation of the cellular endogenous inhibitors may contribute to malignant transformation by regulating specific phosphorylation events. Pharmacological modulation of PP2A activity is becoming an attractive strategy for cancer treatment. Some compounds targeting PP2A are able to induce PP2A reactivation and subsequent cell death in several types of cancer...
October 14, 2016: Current Medicinal Chemistry
Thomas A Masters, John Kendrick-Jones, Folma Buss
Myosins are cytoskeletal motor proteins that use energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to generate force and movement along actin filaments. Humans express 38 myosin genes belonging to 12 classes that participate in a diverse range of crucial activities, including muscle contraction, intracellular trafficking, cell division, motility, actin cytoskeletal organisation and cell signalling. Myosin malfunction has been implicated a variety of disorders including deafness, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, Usher syndrome, Griscelli syndrome and cancer...
October 19, 2016: Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology
Lovish Marwaha, Yashika Bansal, Raghunath Singh, Priyanka Saroj, Ranjana Bhandari, Anurag Kuhad
Neuropathic pain is a debilitating disease which affects central as well as peripheral nervous system. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are ligand-gated ion channels that detect physical and chemical stimuli and promote painful sensations via nociceptor activation. TRP channels have physiological role in the mechanisms controlling several physiological responses like temperature and mechanical sensations, response to painful stimuli, taste, and pheromones. TRP channel family involves six different TRPs (TRPV1, TRPV2, TRPV3, TRPV4, TRPM8, and TRPA1) which are expressed in pain sensing neurons and primary afferent nociceptors...
October 18, 2016: Inflammopharmacology
Davide Amato, Clare L Beasley, Margaret K Hahn, Anthony C Vernon
Antipsychotic drugs, all of which block the dopamine D2 receptor to a greater or lesser extent, are the mainstay for the pharmacological treatment of schizophrenia. Engaging in a deeper understanding of how antipsychotics act on the brain and body, at the cellular, molecular and physiological level is vital to comprehend both the beneficial and potentially harmful actions of these medications and stimulate development of novel therapeutics. To address this, we review recent advances in our understanding of neuroadaptations to antipsychotics, focusing on (1) treatment efficacy, (2) impact on brain volume and (3) evidence from human post-mortem studies that attempt to dissect neuropathological effects of antipsychotic drugs from organic schizophrenia neurobiology and (4) cardio-metabolic side effects...
October 15, 2016: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
Lola Corzo, Susana Rodríguez, Ramón Alejo, Lucía Fernández-Novoa, Gjumrakch Aliev, Ramón Cacabelos
Menopause is a natural event in women´s lives leading to the cessation of menstruation and the reproductive function due to loss of the ovarian follicular function. Menopause-derived estrogen deprivation and related endocrine factors are linked to some symptoms of middle-aged women, such as hot flashes, aches, joint pain, stiffness, depressed mood, bone degeneration, nutritional dysfunction, or difficulty to maintain body mass. Clinical approaches to these problems often involve hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and other modalities of therapeutic intervention...
October 14, 2016: Current Drug Metabolism
Haruka Yokota, Ayaka Tsuzuki, Yuki Shimada, Azusa Imai, Daichi Utsumi, Takuya Tsukahara, Misaki Matsumoto, Kikuko Amagase, Kazumi Iwata, Akio Nakamura, Chihiro Yabe-Nishimura, Shinichi Kato
NOX1/NADPH oxidase, a non-phagocytic isoform of reactive oxygen species-producing enzymes, is highly expressed in the colon, but the physiological and pathophysiological roles of this isoform are not fully understood. The present study investigated the role of NOX1 in the development of colonic inflammation in a trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced murine colitis model. Intrarectal injection of TNBS caused severe colitis accompanied by body weight loss, diarrhea, and increased MPO activity in wild-type (WT) mice...
October 17, 2016: Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Chrysanthi Fergani, Victor Navarro
Reproductive function is driven by the hormonal interplay between the gonads and brain-pituitary axis. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is released in a pulsatile manner, which is critical for the attainment and maintenance of fertility, however, GnRH neurons lack the ability to directly respond to most regulatory factors, and a hierarchical upstream neuronal network governs its secretion. We and others proposed a model in which Kiss1 neurons in the arcuate nucleus (ARC), so called KNDy neurons, release kisspeptin (a potent GnRH secretagogue) in a pulsatile manner to drive GnRH pulses under the coordinated autosynaptic action of its cotransmitters, the tachykinin neurokinin B (NKB, stimulatory) and dynorphin (inhibitory)...
October 17, 2016: Reproduction: the Official Journal of the Society for the Study of Fertility
Volker M Lauschke, Magnus Ingelman-Sundberg
Responses to drugs and pharmacological treatments differ considerably between individuals. Importantly, only 50%-75% of patients have been shown to react adequately to pharmacological interventions, whereas the others experience either a lack of efficacy or suffer from adverse events. The liver is of central importance in the metabolism of most drugs. Because of this exposed status, hepatotoxicity is amongst the most common adverse drug reactions and hepatic liabilities are the most prevalent reason for the termination of development programs of novel drug candidates...
October 12, 2016: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Marko Poglitsch
Primary aldosteronism (PA) is severe form of hypertension characterized by a strongly increased aldosterone secretion mediated by adenomas or other forms of adrenal hyper-activity. Once detected, PA can be usually cured by either surgical intervention or by appropriate pharmacologic treatments. The incidence of PA among hypertensive patients varies strongly between different studies, which is in part caused by the complex state-of-the-art testing procedure that is unfortunately far away from being a versatile PA screening tool...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Vera Erdman, Ilsia Tuktarova, Timur Nasibullin, Ianina Timasheva, Olga Mustafina
OBJECTIVE: Physiological and biochemical changes during aging alter drug metabolism. Drug intake is increased with age because of cumulative morbidity, in particular, high prevalence of cardiovascular diseases. Antihypertensive medications are the most commonly used drugs. Individual drug sensitivity or resistance may be influenced by the variance of the "pharmacological response" genes.Our purpose was to search for the polymorphic variants of "pharmacological response" genes associated with survival in different age periods...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Karima Ait-Aissa, Joseph Hockenberry, David Gutterman, Aron Geurts, Andreas Beyer
OBJECTIVE: Flow mediated dilation (FMD) is the most physiological relevant form of endothelial-mediated vasodilation. Our laboratory has previously shown that telomerase, a ribo-nucleoprotein that counteracts telomere shortening, has a protective effect on endothelial function under conditions of oxidative stress in the human microcirculation. In the presence of coronary artery disease, decreased telomerase activity contributes to a shift in the mediator of FMD from atheroprotective nitric oxide (NO) to pro-inflammatory and atherogenic hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Masatsugu Horiuchi
Hypertensive patients have greater chances of such cardiovascular events as stroke, coronary heart disease, heart or renal failure, peripheral artery disease, and dementia. It is also well recognized that diabetes increases the cardiovascular risks in concert with hypertension. Therefore, main goals for an innovation of anti-hypertensive therapy would be to achieve further risk reduction by targeting the functional, metabolic, and structural alterations associated with hypertension. Professors Dzau and Braunwald et al proposed the concept of "the cardiovascular disease continuum" in 1991, and that hypertension may trigger the chain of events, leading to end-stage heart disease; however, this concept was quite new at that time, and there was some discussion whether "the cardiovascular disease continuum" is true or not...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Scott C Watkins, Andrew D Shaw
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The past decade has seen more advances in our understanding of fluid therapy than the preceding decades combined. What was once thought to be a relatively benign panacea is increasingly being recognized as a potent pharmacological and physiological intervention that may pose as much harm as benefit. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent studies have clearly indicated that the amount, type, and timing of fluid administration have profound effects on patient morbidity and outcomes...
September 29, 2016: Current Opinion in Critical Care
Amit Agrawal, Veena Asthana, J P Sharma, Vineeta Gupta
BACKGROUND: Subarachnoid block is the preferred technique for providing anesthesia for patients undergoing cesarean section. Various pharmacological agents in added to local anesthetics (LA) modify their original effects in terms of block characteristics and quality of analgesia. However, there is ongoing debate about this practice of using adjuncts with LA. We tested whether addition of lipophilic versus lipophobic opioids to LA gives any clinical benefits to maternal and fetal outcome when used in these patients requiring spinal anesthesia...
September 2016: Anesthesia, Essays and Researches
Omer Akyol, Sumeyya Akyol, Chu-Huang Chen
Endothelial cells (EC) respond to injury by releasing numerous factors, including von Willebrand factor (VWF). High circulating levels of unusually large VWF multimers (UL-VWFM) have strong procoagulant activity and facilitate platelet adhesion and aggregation by interacting with platelets after an acute event superimposed on peripheral arterial disease and coronary artery disease. ADAMTS13-a disintegrin-like metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motif type 1 member 13-regulates a key physiological process of coagulation in the circulation by cleaving VWF multimers into small, inactive fragments...
October 13, 2016: Clinica Chimica Acta; International Journal of Clinical Chemistry
Hisamitsu Hayashi, Fredrik Edin, Hao Li, Wei Liu, Helge Rask-Andersen
Endogenous electric fields (EFs) are required for the physiological control of the central nervous system development. Application of the direct current EFs to neural stem cells has been studied for the possibility of stem cell transplantation as one of the therapies for brain injury. EFs generated within the nervous system are often associated with action potentials and synaptic activity, apparently resulting in a pulsed current in nature. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of pulsed EF, which can reduce the cytotoxicity, on the migration of human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs)...
October 13, 2016: Brain Research
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"