keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Affective neuroscience neuroimaging

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29163257/free-will-and-the-brain-disease-model-of-addiction-the-not-so-seductive-allure-of-neuroscience-and-its-modest-impact-on-the-attribution-of-free-will-to-people-with-an-addiction
#1
Eric Racine, Sebastian Sattler, Alice Escande
Free will has been the object of debate in the context of addiction given that addiction could compromise an individual's ability to choose freely between alternative courses of action. Proponents of the brain-disease model of addiction have argued that a neuroscience perspective on addiction reduces the attribution of free will because it relocates the cause of the disorder to the brain rather than to the person, thereby diminishing the blame attributed to the person with an addiction. Others have worried that such displacement of free will attribution would make the person with a drug addiction less responsible...
2017: Frontiers in Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29017626/case-series-of-mild-behavioral-impairment-toward-an-understanding-of-the-early-stages-of-neurodegenerative-diseases-affecting-behavior-and-cognition
#2
Alicja Cieslak, Eric E Smith, John Lysack, Zahinoor Ismail
Mild behavioral impairment (MBI) is characterized by later life acquired, sustained, and impactful neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) of any severity that cannot be better accounted for by other formal medical and psychiatric nosology. MBI is an "at risk" state for incident cognitive decline and dementia, and for some, MBI is the index manifestation of neurodegeneration, observed in advance of cognitive impairment. Initially described in Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD), MBI evolved to describe a preclinical stage of all cause dementia, and has been operationalized in the International Society to Advance Alzheimer's Research and Treatment-Alzheimer's Association (ISTAART-AA) proposed research diagnostic criteria...
October 11, 2017: International Psychogeriatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28949821/logical-and-methodological-issues-affecting-genetic-studies-of-humans-reported-in-top-neuroscience-journals
#3
Clara R Grabitz, Katherine S Button, Marcus R Munafò, Dianne F Newbury, Cyril R Pernet, Paul A Thompson, Dorothy V M Bishop
Genetics and neuroscience are two areas of science that pose particular methodological problems because they involve detecting weak signals (i.e., small effects) in noisy data. In recent years, increasing numbers of studies have attempted to bridge these disciplines by looking for genetic factors associated with individual differences in behavior, cognition, and brain structure or function. However, different methodological approaches to guarding against false positives have evolved in the two disciplines. To explore methodological issues affecting neurogenetic studies, we conducted an in-depth analysis of 30 consecutive articles in 12 top neuroscience journals that reported on genetic associations in nonclinical human samples...
September 26, 2017: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28887387/neural-architecture-of-selective-stopping-strategies-distinct-brain-activity-patterns-are-associated-with-attentional-capture-but-not-with-outright-stopping
#4
Alexandra Sebastian, Kora Rössler, Michael Wibral, Arian Mobascher, Klaus Lieb, Patrick Jung, Oliver Tüscher
In stimulus-selective stop-signal tasks, the salient stop signal needs attentional processing before genuine response inhibition is completed. Differential prefrontal involvement in attentional capture and response inhibition has been linked to the right inferior frontal junction (IFJ) and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC), respectively. Recently, it has been suggested that stimulus-selective stopping may be accomplished by the following different strategies: individuals may selectively inhibit their response only upon detecting a stop signal (independent discriminate then stop strategy) or unselectively whenever detecting a stop or attentional capture signal (stop then discriminate strategy)...
October 4, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28883803/basic-emotions-in-human-neuroscience-neuroimaging-and-beyond
#5
REVIEW
Alessia Celeghin, Matteo Diano, Arianna Bagnis, Marco Viola, Marco Tamietto
The existence of so-called 'basic emotions' and their defining attributes represents a long lasting and yet unsettled issue in psychology. Recently, neuroimaging evidence, especially related to the advent of neuroimaging meta-analytic methods, has revitalized this debate in the endeavor of systems and human neuroscience. The core theme focuses on the existence of unique neural bases that are specific and characteristic for each instance of basic emotion. Here we review this evidence, outlining contradictory findings, strengths and limits of different approaches...
2017: Frontiers in Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28761076/-embodied-body-language-an-electrical-neuroimaging-study-with-emotional-faces-and-bodies
#6
Marta Calbi, Monica Angelini, Vittorio Gallese, Maria Alessandra Umiltà
To date, most investigations in the field of affective neuroscience mainly focused on the processing of facial expressions, overlooking the exploration of emotional body language (EBL), its capability to express our emotions notwithstanding. Few electrophysiological studies investigated the time course and the neural correlates of EBL and the integration of face and body emotion-related information. The aim of the present study was to investigate both the time course and the neural correlates underlying the integration of affective information conveyed by faces and bodies...
July 31, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28706080/power-up-a-reanalysis-of-power-failure-in-neuroscience-using-mixture-modeling
#7
Camilla L Nord, Vincent Valton, John Wood, Jonathan P Roiser
Recently, evidence for endemically low statistical power has cast neuroscience findings into doubt. If low statistical power plagues neuroscience, then this reduces confidence in the reported effects. However, if statistical power is not uniformly low, then such blanket mistrust might not be warranted. Here, we provide a different perspective on this issue, analyzing data from an influential study reporting a median power of 21% across 49 meta-analyses (Button et al., 2013). We demonstrate, using Gaussian mixture modeling, that the sample of 730 studies included in that analysis comprises several subcomponents so the use of a single summary statistic is insufficient to characterize the nature of the distribution...
August 23, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28616997/emotion-and-the-prefrontal-cortex-an-integrative-review
#8
Matthew L Dixon, Ravi Thiruchselvam, Rebecca Todd, Kalina Christoff
The prefrontal cortex (PFC) plays a critical role in the generation and regulation of emotion. However, we lack an integrative framework for understanding how different emotion-related functions are organized across the entire expanse of the PFC, as prior reviews have generally focused on specific emotional processes (e.g., decision making) or specific anatomical regions (e.g., orbitofrontal cortex). Additionally, psychological theories and neuroscientific investigations have proceeded largely independently because of the lack of a common framework...
October 2017: Psychological Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28434615/searching-for-cross-diagnostic-convergence-neural-mechanisms-governing-excitation-and-inhibition-balance-in-schizophrenia-and-autism-spectrum-disorders
#9
REVIEW
Jennifer H Foss-Feig, Brendan D Adkinson, Jie Lisa Ji, Genevieve Yang, Vinod H Srihari, James C McPartland, John H Krystal, John D Murray, Alan Anticevic
Recent theoretical accounts have proposed excitation and inhibition (E/I) imbalance as a possible mechanistic, network-level hypothesis underlying neural and behavioral dysfunction across neurodevelopmental disorders, particularly autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and schizophrenia (SCZ). These two disorders share some overlap in their clinical presentation as well as convergence in their underlying genes and neurobiology. However, there are also clear points of dissociation in terms of phenotypes and putatively affected neural circuitry...
May 15, 2017: Biological Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28329869/50-years-of-cognitive-aging-theory
#10
Nicole D Anderson, Fergus I M Craik
Objectives: The objectives of this Introduction to the Journal of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences special issue on "50 Years of Cognitive Aging Theory" are to provide a brief overview of cognitive aging research prior to 1965 and to highlight significant developments in cognitive aging theory over the last 50 years. Method: Historical and recent theories of cognitive aging were reviewed, with a particular focus on those not directly covered by the articles included in this special issue...
December 9, 2016: Journals of Gerontology. Series B, Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28213134/speech-in-noise-perception-in-musicians-a-review
#11
REVIEW
Emily B J Coffey, Nicolette B Mogilever, Robert J Zatorre
The ability to understand speech in the presence of competing sound sources is an important neuroscience question in terms of how the nervous system solves this computational problem. It is also a critical clinical problem that disproportionally affects the elderly, children with language-related learning disorders, and those with hearing loss. Recent evidence that musicians have an advantage on this multifaceted skill has led to the suggestion that musical training might be used to improve or delay the decline of speech-in-noise (SIN) function...
September 2017: Hearing Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28005461/the-neuroscience-of-persuasion-a-review-with-an-emphasis-on-issues-and-opportunities
#12
John T Cacioppo, Stephanie Cacioppo, Richard E Petty
Persuasion, a prevalent form of social influence in humans, refers to an active attempt to change a person's attitudes, beliefs, or behavior. There is a growing literature on the neural correlates of persuasion. As is often the case in an emerging literature, however, there are a number of questions, concerns, and alternative interpretations that can be raised about the research and interpretations. We provide a critical review of the research, noting potential problems and issues that warrant attention to move the field forward...
January 9, 2017: Social Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27974471/50-years-of-cognitive-aging-theory
#13
EDITORIAL
Nicole D Anderson, Fergus I M Craik
OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this Introduction to the Journal of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences special issue on "50 Years of Cognitive Aging Theory" are to provide a brief overview of cognitive aging research prior to 1965 and to highlight significant developments in cognitive aging theory over the last 50 years. METHOD: Historical and recent theories of cognitive aging were reviewed, with a particular focus on those not directly covered by the articles included in this special issue...
January 2017: Journals of Gerontology. Series B, Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27870421/multimodal-neuroimaging-of-male-and-female-brain-structure-in-health-and-disease-across-the-life-span
#14
REVIEW
Neda Jahanshad, Paul M Thompson
Sex differences in brain development and aging are important to identify, as they may help to understand risk factors and outcomes in brain disorders that are more prevalent in one sex compared with the other. Brain imaging techniques have advanced rapidly in recent years, yielding detailed structural and functional maps of the living brain. Even so, studies are often limited in sample size, and inconsistent findings emerge, one example being varying findings regarding sex differences in the size of the corpus callosum...
January 2, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27867832/a-neuroimaging-point-of-view-on-the-diversity-of-social-cognition-evidence-for-extended-influence-of-experience-and-emotion-related-factors-on-face-processing
#15
REVIEW
Nathalie George
Faces are key social stimuli that convey a wealth of information essential for person perception and adaptive interpersonal behaviour. Studies in the domain of cognitive, affective, and social neuroscience have put in light that the processing of faces recruits specific visual regions and activates a distributed set of brain regions related to attentional, emotional, social, and memory processes associated with the perception of faces and the extraction of the numerous information attached to them. Studies using neuroimaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have allowed localizing these brain regions and characterizing their functional properties...
2016: Culture and Brain
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27855424/arts-brain-and-cognition
#16
REVIEW
Vida Demarin, Marina Roje Bedeković, Marijana Bosnar Puretić, Marija Bošnjak Pašić
Art is a product of human creativity; it is a superior skill that can be learned by study, practice and observation. Modern neuroscience and neuroimaging enable study of the processes during artistic performance. Creative people have less marked hemispheric dominance. It was found that the right hemisphere is specialized for metaphoric thinking, playfulness, solution finding and synthesizing, it is the center of visualization, imagination and conceptualization, but the left hemisphere is still needed for artistic work to achieve balance...
December 2016: Psychiatria Danubina
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27798256/how-should-neuroscience-study-emotions-by-distinguishing-emotion-states-concepts-and-experiences
#17
Ralph Adolphs
In this debate with Lisa Feldman Barrett, I defend a view of emotions as biological functional states. Affective neuroscience studies emotions in this sense, but it also studies the conscious experience of emotion ('feelings'), our ability to attribute emotions to others and to animals ('attribution', 'anthropomorphizing'), our ability to think and talk about emotion ('concepts of emotion', 'semantic knowledge of emotion') and the behaviors caused by an emotion ('expression of emotions', 'emotional reactions')...
January 1, 2017: Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27779910/decoding-dynamic-brain-patterns-from-evoked-responses-a-tutorial-on-multivariate-pattern-analysis-applied-to-time-series-neuroimaging-data
#18
Tijl Grootswagers, Susan G Wardle, Thomas A Carlson
Multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) or brain decoding methods have become standard practice in analyzing fMRI data. Although decoding methods have been extensively applied in brain-computer interfaces, these methods have only recently been applied to time series neuroimaging data such as MEG and EEG to address experimental questions in cognitive neuroscience. In a tutorial style review, we describe a broad set of options to inform future time series decoding studies from a cognitive neuroscience perspective...
April 2017: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27744097/the-application-of-neuroimaging-to-social-inequity-and-language-disparity-a-cautionary-examination
#19
REVIEW
Monica E Ellwood-Lowe, Matthew D Sacchet, Ian H Gotlib
In the nascent field of the cognitive neuroscience of socioeconomic status (SES), researchers are using neuroimaging to examine how growing up in poverty affects children's neurocognitive development, particularly their language abilities. In this review we highlight difficulties inherent in the frequent use of reverse inference to interpret SES-related abnormalities in brain regions that support language. While there is growing evidence suggesting that SES moderates children's developing brain structure and function, no studies to date have elucidated explicitly how these neural findings are related to variations in children's language abilities, or precisely what it is about SES that underlies or contributes to these differences...
December 2016: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27688155/sex-and-gender-affect-the-social-brain-beyond-simplicity
#20
REVIEW
Marina A Pavlova
As the most fascinating, complex, and dynamic part of our organism, the human brain is shaped by many interacting factors that not only are of neurobiological (including sex hormones) and environmental origin but are also sociocultural in their very nature (such as social roles). Gender is one of these factors. Most neurological, neurodevelopmental, neuropsychiatric, and psychosomatic disorders are characterized by impairments in visual social cognition (primarily body language reading and face perception) and a skewed sex ratio: females and males are affected differently in terms of clinical picture, prevalence, and severity...
January 2, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience Research
keyword
keyword
24563
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"