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human evolution

Ondrej Balvín, Warren Booth
For over two decades, the bed bug, Cimex lectularius L. (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) has been undergoing a dramatic global resurgence, likely in part to the evolution of mechanisms conferring resistance to insecticides. One such mechanism is knock-down resistance (kdr), resulting from nonsynonymous mutations within the voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) gene. To date, three mutations have been identified in C. lectularius, V419L, L925I, and I936F. Using Sanger sequencing, the frequency and distribution of these VGSC mutations across 131 populations collected from the bat-associated and human-associated lineages of C...
March 15, 2018: Journal of Medical Entomology
Mansoureh Haghighi, Hossein Khanahmad, Abbasali Palizban
The B-lymphocyte antigen (CD20) is a suitable target for single-stranded (ss) nucleic acid oligomer (aptamers). The aim of study was selection and characterization of a ssDNA aptamer against CD20 using Cell-Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (Cell-SELEX). The cDNA clone of CD20 (pcDNA-CD20) was transfected to human embryonic kidney (HEK293T) cells. Ten rounds of Cell-SELEX was performed on recombinant HEK-CD20 cells. The final eluted ssDNA pool was amplified and ligated in T/A vector for cloning...
March 21, 2018: Molecules: a Journal of Synthetic Chemistry and Natural Product Chemistry
Alessandro Fiocchi, Lamia Dahdah, Vincenzo Fierro, Maria C Artesani, Rocco Valluzzi
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The epidemiology of food allergy did inspire theories on the reasons for the recent surge of the disease. We offer here a reasoned review on the relationships between the trajectories of human development and the trend of the food allergy epidemics. RECENT FINDINGS: The exponential trend of the frequency of food allergy paralleled the explosive acceleration of the human development over the last few decades. Dietary factors have been indicated as responsible for these trends and targeted for potential preventive strategies...
March 20, 2018: Current Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Marta Florio, Michael Heide, Anneline Pinson, Holger Brandl, Mareike Albert, Sylke Winkler, Pauline Wimberger, Wieland B Huttner, Michael Hiller
Understanding the molecular basis that underlies the expansion of the neocortex during primate, and notably human, evolution requires the identification of genes that are particularly active in the neural stem and progenitor cells of the developing neocortex. Here, we have used existing transcriptome datasets to carry out a comprehensive screen for protein-coding genes preferentially expressed in progenitors of fetal human neocortex. We show that fifteen human-specific genes exhibit such expression, and many of them evolved distinct neural progenitor cell-type expression profiles and levels compared to their ancestral paralogs...
March 21, 2018: ELife
Alexandra Mendoza-Caminade
Although research on human biological material has long been the subject of much controversy, the question of the embryo is an extremely delicate subject.Concerns are strong about the possibilities of conducting research on embryonic matter, and the difficulties in defining the legal rules applicable to the embryo are also found in research and intellectual property. The field of patentability depends on the notion retained about the embryo because of a principle prohibiting the use of human embryos for industrial or commercial purposes...
March 7, 2018: Journal International de Bioéthique et D'éthique des Sciences
Daniel Vigneau
For a long time, the legal condition of the child conceived, the embryo or the human fœtus, to use the language of biomedicine, was dominated by two main principles : one, having its roots in Roman law, made it possible to count it, by anticipation, among beings with a legal existence, so as to grant it its rights, as if it was already born (the infans conceptus maxim) : the other, protecting its life in utero, and so its chances of being born, by the penal incrimination of abortion. The legalisation of abortion by the ?Veil? law of 17 January 1975 upset this traditional approach of the law...
March 7, 2018: Journal International de Bioéthique et D'éthique des Sciences
Andrea Cipriano, Monica Ballarino
The completion of the human genome sequence together with advances in sequencing technologies have shifted the paradigm of the genome, as composed of discrete and hereditable coding entities, and have shown the abundance of functional noncoding DNA. This part of the genome, previously dismissed as "junk" DNA, increases proportionally with organismal complexity and contributes to gene regulation beyond the boundaries of known protein-coding genes. Different classes of functionally relevant nonprotein-coding RNAs are transcribed from noncoding DNA sequences...
2018: Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences
Ljiljana Progovac, Natalia Rakhlin, William Angell, Ryan Liddane, Lingfei Tang, Noa Ofen
We address the puzzle of "unity in diversity" in human languages by advocating the (minimal) common denominator for the diverse expressions of transitivity across human languages, consistent with the view that early in language evolution there was a modest beginning for syntax and that this beginning provided the foundation for the further elaboration of syntactic complexity. This study reports the results of a functional MRI experiment investigating differential patterns of brain activation during processing of sentences with minimal versus fuller syntactic structures...
2018: Frontiers in Psychology
Victoria Shabardina, Tabea Kischka, Hanna Kmita, Yutaka Suzuki, Wojciech Makałowski
Amoebozoans are in many aspects interesting research objects, as they combine features of single-cell organisms with complex signaling and defense systems, comparable to multicellular organisms. Acanthamoeba castellanii is a cosmopolitan species and developed diverged feeding abilities and strong anti-bacterial resistance; Entamoeba histolytica is a parasitic amoeba, who underwent massive gene loss and its genome is almost twice smaller than that of A. castellanii . Nevertheless, both species prosper, demonstrating fitness to their specific environments...
2018: International Journal of Biological Sciences
Paul E Smaldino, Thomas J Flamson, Richard McElreath
Human sociality depends upon the benefits of mutual aid and extensive communication. However, diverse norms and preferences complicate mutual aid, and ambiguity in meaning hinders communication. Here we demonstrate that these two problems can work together to enhance cooperation through the strategic use of deliberately ambiguous signals: covert signaling. Covert signaling is the transmission of information that is accurately received by its intended audience but obscured when perceived by others. Such signals may allow coordination and enhanced cooperation while also avoiding the alienation or hostile reactions of individuals with different preferences...
March 20, 2018: Scientific Reports
Jillian M Petersen, Jay Osvatic
Animals evolved in a world teeming with microbes, which play pivotal roles in their health, development, and evolution. Although the overwhelming majority of living animals are invertebrates, the minority of "microbiome" studies focus on this group. Interest in invertebrate-microbe interactions is 2-fold-a range of immune components are conserved across almost all animal (including human) life, and their functional roles may be conserved. Thus, understanding cross talk between microbes and invertebrate animals can lead to insights of broader relevance...
March 2018: MSystems
Melanie Tramontano, Sergej Andrejev, Mihaela Pruteanu, Martina Klünemann, Michael Kuhn, Marco Galardini, Paula Jouhten, Aleksej Zelezniak, Georg Zeller, Peer Bork, Athanasios Typas, Kiran Raosaheb Patil
Bacterial metabolism plays a fundamental role in gut microbiota ecology and host-microbiome interactions. Yet the metabolic capabilities of most gut bacteria have remained unknown. Here we report growth characteristics of 96 phylogenetically diverse gut bacterial strains across 4 rich and 15 defined media. The vast majority of strains (76) grow in at least one defined medium, enabling accurate assessment of their biosynthetic capabilities. These do not necessarily match phylogenetic similarity, thus indicating a complex evolution of nutritional preferences...
March 19, 2018: Nature Microbiology
Soham Sengupta, Rachel Nechushtai, Patricia A Jennings, Jose' N Onuchic, Pamela A Padilla, Rajeev K Azad, Ron Mittler
The iron-sulfur (2Fe-2S) binding motif CDGSH appears in many important plant and animal proteins that regulate iron and reactive oxygen metabolism. In human it is found in CISD1-3 proteins involved in diabetes, obesity, cancer, aging, cardiovascular disease and neurodegeneration. Despite the important biological role of the CDGSH domain, its origin, evolution and diversification, are largely unknown. Here, we report that: (1) the CDGSH domain appeared early in evolution, perhaps linked to the heavy use of iron-sulfur driven metabolism by early organisms; (2) a CISD3-like protein with two CDGSH domains on the same polypeptide appears to represent the ancient archetype of CDGSH proteins; (3) the origin of the human CISD3 protein is linked to the mitochondrial endosymbiotic event; (4) the CISD1/2 type proteins that contain only one CDGSH domain, but function as homodimers, originated after the divergence of bacteria and archaea/eukaryotes from their common ancestor; and (5) the human CISD1 and CISD2 proteins diverged about 650-720 million years ago, and CISD3 and CISD1/2 share their descent from an ancestral CISD about 1-1...
March 19, 2018: Scientific Reports
Melinda M Pettigrew, Christian P Ahearn, Janneane F Gent, Yong Kong, Mary C Gallo, James B Munro, Adonis D'Mello, Sanjay Sethi, Hervé Tettelin, Timothy F Murphy
Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) exclusively colonize and infect humans and are critical to the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In vitro and animal models do not accurately capture the complex environments encountered by NTHi during human infection. We conducted whole-genome sequencing of 269 longitudinally collected cleared and persistent NTHi from a 15-y prospective study of adults with COPD. Genome sequences were used to elucidate the phylogeny of NTHi isolates, identify genomic changes that occur with persistence in the human airways, and evaluate the effect of selective pressure on 12 candidate vaccine antigens...
March 19, 2018: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Nicolas Noël, Béatrice Jacquelin, Nicolas Huot, Cécile Goujard, Olivier Lambotte, Michaela Müller-Trutwin
Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) induces a persistent and incurable infection. However, the combined antiretroviral treatment (cART) has markedly changed the evolution of the infection and transformed a deadly disease into a manageable chronic infection. Withdrawal of cART generally leads though to resumption of the viral replication. The eradication of the virus from its cellular and anatomical reservoirs remains a goal-to-achieve for a cure. In this context, developing novel therapies contributing to this aim are an important field of research...
March 9, 2018: Cytokine & Growth Factor Reviews
Rekha Seshadri, Sinead C Leahy, Graeme T Attwood, Koon Hoong Teh, Suzanne C Lambie, Adrian L Cookson, Emiley A Eloe-Fadrosh, Georgios A Pavlopoulos, Michalis Hadjithomas, Neha J Varghese, David Paez-Espino, Rechelle Perry, Gemma Henderson, Christopher J Creevey, Nicolas Terrapon, Pascal Lapebie, Elodie Drula, Vincent Lombard, Edward Rubin, Nikos C Kyrpides, Bernard Henrissat, Tanja Woyke, Natalia N Ivanova, William J Kelly
Productivity of ruminant livestock depends on the rumen microbiota, which ferment indigestible plant polysaccharides into nutrients used for growth. Understanding the functions carried out by the rumen microbiota is important for reducing greenhouse gas production by ruminants and for developing biofuels from lignocellulose. We present 410 cultured bacteria and archaea, together with their reference genomes, representing every cultivated rumen-associated archaeal and bacterial family. We evaluate polysaccharide degradation, short-chain fatty acid production and methanogenesis pathways, and assign specific taxa to functions...
March 19, 2018: Nature Biotechnology
Clémence Granier, Emeline Vinatier, Elia Colin, Marion Mandavit, Charles Dariane, Virginie Verkarre, Lucie Biard, Rami El Zein, Corinne Lesaffre, Isabelle Galy-Fauroux, Hélène Roussel, Eléonore De Guillebon, Charlotte Blanc, Antonin Saldmann, Cécile Badoual, Alain Gey, Éric Tartour
Immune cells are important components of the tumor microenvironment and influence tumor growth and evolution at all stages of carcinogenesis. Notably, it is now well established that the immune infiltrate in human tumors can correlate with prognosis and response to therapy. The analysis of the immune infiltrate in the tumor microenvironment has become a major challenge for the classification of patients and the response to treatment. The co-expression of inhibitory receptors such as Program Cell Death Protein 1 (PD1; also known as CD279), Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Associated Protein 4 (CTLA-4), T-Cell Immunoglobulin and Mucin Containing Protein-3 (Tim-3; also known as CD366), and Lymphocyte Activation Gene 3 (Lag-3; also known as CD223), is a hallmark of T cell exhaustion...
February 8, 2018: Journal of Visualized Experiments: JoVE
Brian G O'Flynn, Aidan J Hawley, David J Merkler
Crop protection against destructive pests has been at the forefront of recent agricultural advancements. Rapid adaptive evolution has led to insects becoming immune to the chemicals employed to quell their damage. Insecticide resistance is a serious problem that negatively impacts food production, food storage, human health, and the environment. To make matters more complicated are the strict regulations in place on insecticide development, driven by rising public concern relating to the harmful effects these chemicals have on the environment and on society...
2018: Biochemistry & Molecular Biology Journal
Ava Yuan Xue, Antonella Di Pizio, Anat Levit, Tali Yarnitzky, Osnat Penn, Tal Pupko, Masha Y Niv
The 25 human bitter taste receptors (hT2Rs) recognize thousands of structurally and chemically diverse bitter substances. The binding modes of human bitter taste receptors hT2R10 and hT2R46, which are responsible for strychnine recognition, were previously established using site-directed mutagenesis, functional assays, and molecular modeling. Here we construct a phylogenetic tree and reconstruct ancestral sequences of the T2R10 and T2R46 clades. We next analyze the binding sites in view of experimental data to predict their ability to recognize strychnine...
2018: Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences
Andrej Steyer, Tilen Konte, Martin Sagadin, Marko Kolenc, Andrej Škoberne, Julija Germ, Tadeja Dovč-Drnovšek, Miha Arnol, Mateja Poljšak-Prijatelj
Noroviruses are the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis, and they can affect humans of all age groups. In immunocompromised patients, norovirus infections can develop into chronic diarrhea or show prolonged asymptomatic virus shedding. Chronic norovirus infections are frequently reported for solid organ transplant recipients, with rapid intrahost norovirus evolution seen. In this report, we describe a case of chronic norovirus infection in an immunocompromised patient who was followed up for over 5 years...
2018: Frontiers in Microbiology
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