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Games medical education

Li-Ang Lee, Shu-Ling Wang, Yi-Ping Chao, Ming-Shao Tsai, Li-Jen Hsin, Chung-Jan Kang, Chia-Hsiang Fu, Wei-Chieh Chao, Chung-Guei Huang, Hsueh-Yu Li, Cheng-Keng Chuang
BACKGROUND: The use of mobile technology in e-learning (M-TEL) can add new levels of experience and significantly increase the attractiveness of e-learning in medical education. Whether an innovative interactive e-learning multimedia (IM) module or a conventional PowerPoint show (PPS) module using M-TEL to teach emergent otorhinolaryngology-head and neck surgery (ORL-HNS) disorders is feasible and efficient in undergraduate medical students is unknown. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare the impact of a novel IM module with a conventional PPS module using M-TEL for emergent ORL-HNS disorders with regard to learning outcomes, satisfaction, and learning experience...
March 8, 2018: JMIR Medical Education
Liane Connelly, Beth E Burbach, Colleen Kennedy, Lisa Walters
BACKGROUND: The U.S. nursing workforce is facing a severe shortage of professionals due to an anticipated retirement of more than 500,000 RNs in the next 5 years. METHOD: An Escape to Nursing event was created and delivered in a rural medical center college of nursing in the spring of 2017. This faculty team developed four distinct rooms that were designed with key nursing concepts and patient health conditions. Recruits worked in teams to solve the patient health care puzzle, which then enabled them to proceed to the next room...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Nursing Education
Masako Hoshikawa, Sunao Uchida, Yuichi Hirano
BACKGROUND: The amount, quality, and timing of sleep are considered important for athletes' ability to train, maximize training responses, and recover. However, some research has shown that elite athletes do not obtain sufficient sleep. Based on this background, researchers recently started to assess and manage sleep in elite athletes. The purpose of this study was to clarify the prevalence of poor sleep quality and its associated factors amongst elite Japanese athletes. METHODS: Eight hundred and ninety-one candidates for the 17th Asian Games Incheon 2014, who were over 20 years old, participated in this study...
February 26, 2018: Sports Medicine—Open
Chrystal Rutledge, Catharine M Walsh, Nathan Swinger, Marc Auerbach, Danny Castro, Maya Dewan, Mona Khattab, Alyssa Rake, Ilana Harwayne-Gidansky, Tia T Raymond, Tensing Maa, Todd P Chang
Gamification involves the application of game design elements to traditionally non-game contexts. It is increasingly being used as an adjunct to traditional teaching strategies in medical education to engage the millennial learner and enhance adult learning. The extant literature has focused on determining whether the implementation of gamification results in better learning outcomes, leading to a dearth of research examining its theoretical underpinnings within the medical education context. The authors define gamification, explore how gamification works within the medical education context using self-determination theory as an explanatory mechanism for enhanced engagement and motivation, and discuss common roadblocks and challenges to implementing gamification...
February 20, 2018: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
Iouri Gorbanev, Sandra Agudelo-Londoño, Rafael A González, Ariel Cortes, Alexandra Pomares, Vivian Delgadillo, Francisco J Yepes, Óscar Muñoz
INTRODUCTION: The literature shows an optimistic landscape for the effectiveness of games in medical education. Nevertheless, games are not considered mainstream material in medical teaching. Two research questions that arise are the following: What pedagogical strategies do developers use when creating games for medical education? And what is the quality of the evidence on the effectiveness of games? METHODS: A systematic review was made by a multi-disciplinary team of researchers following the Cochrane Collaboration Guidelines...
December 2018: Medical Education Online
Margot Magnin, Emilien Jeannot, Rajaobelina Voahangy, Beat Stoll
AIM: Malnutrition has multiple causes, not just a lack of calories. We explored the successes and barriers of an innovative, comprehensive programme in Madagascar that educated mothers in particular about nutrition. METHODS: The outpatient programme in Antananarivo treats 2,400 malnourished children from 6-59 months each year. The 35-day programme comprises health checks, cooking demonstrations, the distribution of enriched flour supplements and two food-related games that are called Nutricartes and are based on boards and picture cards...
February 9, 2018: Acta Paediatrica
Yu I Pigolkin, Yu V Lomakin, E N Leonova
Russia joined the Bologna process in 2003 and since that time has become integrated into the unified European educational space. The key element of the new form of the higher education process is the self-guided unsupervised work of the students. Motivation is needed to promote the involvement of the students in the educational process which implies the necessity of the goal-oriented initiative for the acquisition of professional knowledge and practical experience in the field of forensic medicine. To achieve this goal, the Department of Forensic Medicine of I...
2018: Sudebno-meditsinskaia Ekspertiza
Stefania Barbieri, Paolo Feltracco, Vittorio Lucchetta, Rosa Maria Gaudio, Alberto Tredese, Mauro Bergamini, Gianna Vettore, Vincenzo Pietrantonio, Francesco Maria Avato, Daniele Donato, Deris Gianni Boemo, Maria Vittoria Nesoti, Rossella Snenghi
BACKGROUND: NekNomination, also known as NekNominate, Neck and Nominate, or Neck Nomination, is a social network-based drinking game which is thought to have originated in Australia and spread all over the world between 2013 and 2014. Individuals record videos of themselves while rapidly drinking excessive quantities of alcoholic drinks (necking) and then nominate friends to outdo them within 24 hours; the videos are then posted on social media such as Facebook or YouTube. The consequences of this drinking game have been very dangerous; at least 5 people under age 30 years have died after drinking deadly cocktails, and many others have suffered from alcohol intoxication...
January 31, 2018: Interactive Journal of Medical Research
Randy Klaassen, Kim C M Bul, Rieks Op den Akker, Gert Jan van der Burg, Pamela M Kato, Pierpaolo Di Bitonto
Self monitoring, personal goal-setting and coaching, education and social support are strategies to help patients with chronic conditions in their daily care. Various tools have been developed, e.g., mobile digital coaching systems connected with wearable sensors, serious games and patient web portals to personal health records, that aim to support patients with chronic conditions and their caregivers in realizing the ideal of self-management. We describe a platform that integrates these tools to support young patients in diabetes self-management through educational game playing, monitoring and motivational feedback...
January 30, 2018: Sensors
James M Gerard, Anthony J Scalzo, Matthew A Borgman, Christopher M Watson, Chelsie E Byrnes, Todd P Chang, Marc Auerbach, David O Kessler, Brian L Feldman, Brian S Payne, Sohail Nibras, Riti K Chokshi, Joseph O Lopreiato
INTRODUCTION: We developed a first-person serious game, PediatricSim, to teach and assess performances on seven critical pediatric scenarios (anaphylaxis, bronchiolitis, diabetic ketoacidosis, respiratory failure, seizure, septic shock, and supraventricular tachycardia). In the game, players are placed in the role of a code leader and direct patient management by selecting from various assessment and treatment options. The objective of this study was to obtain supportive validity evidence for the PediatricSim game scores...
January 26, 2018: Simulation in Healthcare: Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare
Hege M Johnsen, Mariann Fossum, Pirashanthie Vivekananda-Schmidt, Ann Fruhling, Åshild Slettebø
BACKGROUND: Despite an increasing number of serious games (SGs) in nursing education, few evaluation studies specifically address their educational value in terms of face, content, and construct validity. OBJECTIVES: To assess nursing students' perceptions of a video-based SG in terms of face, content, and construct validity. In addition, the study assessed perceptions of usability, individual factors, and preferences regarding future use. DESIGN: A pilot study was conducted...
December 28, 2017: Nurse Education Today
Steven F DeFroda, Nabil Mehta, Brett D Owens
BACKGROUND: Outcomes after arthroscopic Bankart repair can be highly dependent on compliance and participation in physical therapy. Additionally, there are many variations in physician-recommended physical therapy protocols. HYPOTHESIS: The rehabilitation protocols of academic orthopaedic surgery departments vary widely despite the presence of consensus protocols. STUDY DESIGN: Descriptive epidemiology study. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level 3...
January 1, 2018: Sports Health
Viveta Lobo, Andrew Q Stromberg, Peter Rosston
Point-of-care ultrasound is a critical component of graduate medical training in emergency medicine. Innovation in ultrasound teaching methods is greatly needed to keep up with a changing medical landscape. A field-wide trend promoting simulation and technology-enhanced learning is underway in an effort to improve patient care, as well as patient safety. In an effort to both motivate students and increase their skill retention, training methods are shifting towards a friendly competition model and are gaining popularity nationwide...
September 18, 2017: Curēus
Emily Kroshus, John Parsons, Brian Hainline
CONTEXT:   Sports officials can play an important role in concussion safety by calling injury timeouts so that athletic trainers can evaluate athletes with possible concussions. Understanding the determinants of whether officials call an injury timeout when they suspect a concussion has important implications for the design of interventions that better support officials in this role. OBJECTIVE:   To assess the knowledge of US collegiate football officials about concussion symptoms and to determine the associations between knowledge, perceived injunctive norms, and self-efficacy and calling injury timeouts for suspected concussions in athletes...
November 8, 2017: Journal of Athletic Training
Mark X Cicero, Travis Whitfill, Kevin Munjal, Manu Madhok, Maria Carmen G Diaz, Daniel J Scherzer, Barbara M Walsh, Angela Bowen, Michael Redlener, Scott A Goldberg, Nadine Symons, James Burkett, Joseph C Santos, David Kessler, Ryan N Barnicle, Geno Paesano, Marc A Auerbach
INTRODUCTION: Disaster triage training for emergency medical service (EMS) providers is not standardized. Simulation training is costly and time-consuming. In contrast, educational video games enable low-cost and more time-efficient standardized training. We hypothesized that players of the video game "60 Seconds to Survival" (60S) would have greater improvements in disaster triage accuracy compared to control subjects who did not play 60S. METHODS: Participants recorded their demographics and highest EMS training level and were randomized to play 60S (intervention) or serve as controls...
April 2017: American Journal of Disaster Medicine
Emily Kroshus, John Parsons, Brian Hainline
CONTEXT:   Sports officials can play an important role in concussion safety by calling injury timeouts so that athletic trainers can evaluate athletes with possible concussions. Understanding the determinants of whether officials call an injury timeout when they suspect a concussion has important implications for the design of interventions that better support officials in this role. OBJECTIVE:   To assess the knowledge of US collegiate football officials about concussion symptoms and to determine the associations between knowledge, perceived injunctive norms, and self-efficacy and calling injury timeouts for suspected concussions in athletes...
November 8, 2017: Journal of Athletic Training
Parker A S Crutchfield, Justin S Jarvis, Terry L Olson, Matthew S Wilson
The conventional wisdom in dental and medical education is that dental and medical students experience "ethical erosion" over the duration of dental and medical school. There is some evidence for this claim, but in the case of dental education the evidence consists entirely of survey research, which does not measure behavior. The aim of this study was to measure the altruistic behavior of dental students in order to fill the significant gap in knowledge of how students are disposed to behave, rather than how they are disposed to think...
November 2017: Journal of Dental Education
Jeffrey Scott Delaney, Jeffrey G Caron, José A Correa, Gordon A Bloom
OBJECTIVE: To determine why professional football players in Canada decided not to seek medical attention during a game or practice when they believed they had suffered a concussion. DESIGN: Retrospective survey. SETTING: Preseason Canadian Football League training camps. PARTICIPANTS: Four hundred fifty-four male professional football players. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Reasons athletes did not seek medical attention for a presumed concussion during the previous season, how often this occurred and how important these reasons were in the decision process...
October 20, 2017: Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine: Official Journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine
Hsien-Cheng Lin, Yu-Hsien Chiu, Yenming J Chen, Yee-Pay Wuang, Chiu-Ping Chen, Chih-Chung Wang, Chien-Ling Huang, Tang-Meng Wu, Wen-Hsien Ho
This study developed an interactive computer game-based visual perception learning system for special education children with developmental delay. To investigate whether perceived interactivity affects continued use of the system, this study developed a theoretical model of the process in which learners decide whether to continue using an interactive computer game-based visual perception learning system. The technology acceptance model, which considers perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, and perceived playfulness, was extended by integrating perceived interaction (i...
November 2017: International Journal of Medical Informatics
Krista Hoffmann-Longtin, Jonathan P Rossing, Elizabeth Weinstein
Future physicians will practice medicine in a more complex environment than ever, where skills of interpersonal communication, collaboration and adaptability to change are critical. Applied improvisation (or AI) is an instructional strategy which adapts the concepts of improvisational theater to teach these types of complex skills in other contexts. Unique to AI is its very active teaching approach, adapting theater games to help learners meet curricular objectives. In medical education, AI is particularly helpful when attempting to build students' comfort with and skills in complex, interpersonal behaviors such as effective listening, person-centeredness, teamwork and communication...
October 12, 2017: Medical Teacher
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