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Colorectal cancer blood tests

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29783979/lynch-syndrome-associated-endometrial-carcinoma-with-mlh1-germline-mutation-and-mlh1-promoter-hypermethylation-a-case-report-and-literature-review
#1
Takanori Yokoyama, Kazuhiro Takehara, Nao Sugimoto, Keika Kaneko, Etsuko Fujimoto, Mika Okazawa-Sakai, Shinichi Okame, Yuko Shiroyama, Takashi Yokoyama, Norihiro Teramoto, Shozo Ohsumi, Shinya Saito, Kazuho Imai, Kokichi Sugano
BACKGROUND: Lynch syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disease caused by germline mutations in mismatch repair genes. Analysis for microsatellite instability (MSI) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) of protein expressions of disease-associated genes is used to screen for Lynch syndrome in endometrial cancer patients. When losses of both MLH1 and PMS2 proteins are observed by IHC, MLH1 promoter methylation analysis is conducted to distinguish Lynch syndrome-associated endometrial cancer from sporadic cancer...
May 21, 2018: BMC Cancer
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29778550/the-factors-associated-with-negative-colonoscopy-in-screening-subjects-with-positive-immunochemical-stool-occult-blood-test-outcomes
#2
Po-Hsiang Ting, Xi-Hsuan Lin, Jeng-Kai Jiang, Jiing-Chyuan Luo, Ping-Hsien Chen, Yen-Po Wang, I-Fang Hsin, Chin Lin Perng, Ming-Chih Hou, Fa-Yauh Lee
BACKGROUND: The immunochemical fecal occult blood test (iFOBT) is an alternative method to colonoscopy that can be used for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. If the iFOBT result is positive, a colonoscopy is recommended. In this retrospective study, we identify factors associated with negative colonoscopy and positive iFOBT results obtained during CRC screening. METHODS: We collected data for subjects who received a colonoscopy at Taipei Veterans General Hospital after receiving a positive iFOBT result during CRC screening from January 2015 to December 2015...
May 16, 2018: Journal of the Chinese Medical Association: JCMA
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29774162/a-large-proportion-of-fecal-immunochemical-test-positive-participants-in-colorectal-cancer-screening-is-symptomatic
#3
Clasine M de Klerk, Manon van der Vlugt, Patrick M Bossuyt, Evelien Dekker
Background: Symptomatic invitees are advised not to participate in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening but to directly consult their general practitioner (GP), because fecal immunochemical test (FIT) sensitivity for cancer is not optimal. This recommendation may not always be followed in daily practice. We evaluated how many FIT-positive participants had CRC-related symptoms and whether the presence of symptoms was associated with the presence and location of CRC/advanced neoplasia. Methods: We prospectively collected data on CRC-related symptoms in all FIT-positive participants in the Dutch CRC screening program, referred to our endoscopy centers between 2014 and 2016, and evaluated whether symptoms were associated with detected CRC/advanced neoplasia at colonoscopy...
April 2018: United European Gastroenterology Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29763272/colorectal-cancer-screening-and-prevention
#4
Thad Wilkins, Danielle McMechan, Asif Talukder
Colorectal cancer is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Most colorectal cancers arise from preexisting adenomatous or serrated polyps. The incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer can be reduced with screening of average-risk adults 50 to 75 years of age. Randomized controlled trials show evidence of reduced colorectal cancer-specific mortality with guaiac-based fecal occult blood tests and flexible sigmoidoscopy. There are no randomized controlled trials on the effectiveness of colonoscopy to reduce colorectal cancer-specific mortality; however, several randomized controlled trials comparing colonoscopy with other strategies are in progress...
May 15, 2018: American Family Physician
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29757376/the-role-of-perceived-benefits-and-barriers-in-colorectal-cancer-screening-in-intervention-trials-among-african-americans
#5
Randi M Williams, Thomas Wilkerson, Cheryl L Holt
The Health Belief Model (HBM) is widely used in health behavior interventions. The lack of diverse samples in the development of this theory warrants additional study on how it performs among minorities. While studies have utilized HBM to address colorectal cancer (CRC) screening, limited information exists confirming how these constructs influence screening. Data from three CRC screening trials were used to examine how perceived benefits/barriers perform among African Americans (AA) and whether they serve as mechanisms of the intervention effects on screening...
May 10, 2018: Health Education Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29729257/association-between-bacteremia-from-specific-microbes-and-subsequent-diagnosis-of-colorectal-cancer
#6
Thomas N Y Kwong, Xiansong Wang, Geicho Nakatsu, Tai Cheong Chow, Timothy Tipoe, Rudin Z W Dai, Kelvin K K Tsoi, Martin C S Wong, Gary Tse, Matthew T V Chan, Francis K L Chan, Siew C Ng, Justin C Y Wu, William K K Wu, Jun Yu, Joseph J Y Sung, Sunny H Wong
BACKGROUND & AIMS: Colorectal cancer (CRC) development has been associated with increased proportions of Bacteroides fragilis and certain Streptococcus, Fusobacterium, and Peptostreptococcus species in the intestinal microbiota. We investigated associations between bacteremia from specific intestinal microbes and occurrence of CRC. METHODS: We performed a retrospective study, collecting data from13,096 adult patients (exposed group) in Hong Kong hospitalized with bacteremia (identified by blood culture test), without a previous diagnosis of cancer, from January 1, 2006 through December 31, 2015...
May 2, 2018: Gastroenterology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29724427/acr-appropriateness-criteria-%C3%A2-colorectal-cancer-screening
#7
Courtney Moreno, David H Kim, Twyla B Bartel, Brooks D Cash, Kevin J Chang, Barry W Feig, Kathryn J Fowler, Evelyn M Garcia, Avinash R Kambadakone, Drew L Lambert, Angela D Levy, Daniele Marin, Christine M Peterson, Christopher D Scheirey, Martin P Smith, Stefanie Weinstein, Laura R Carucci
This review summarizes the relevant literature regarding colorectal screening with imaging. For individuals at average or moderate risk for colorectal cancer, CT colonography is usually appropriate for colorectal cancer screening. After positive results on a fecal occult blood test or immunohistochemical test, CT colonography is usually appropriate for colorectal cancer detection. For individuals at high risk for colorectal cancer (eg, hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, ulcerative colitis, or Crohn colitis), optical colonoscopy is preferred because of its ability to obtain biopsies to detect dysplasia...
May 2018: Journal of the American College of Radiology: JACR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29716410/screening-for-colorectal-cancer-in-defunctioned-colons
#8
Fayyaz Akbar, Aaron Quyn, Robert Steele
Objectives Population-based colorectal (bowel) cancer screening using faecal occult blood tests leads to a reduction in cause-specific mortality. However, in people where the colon is defunctioned, the use of standard faecal occult blood test is not appropriate. The aim of this study was to examine the current trends of clinical practice for colorectal cancer screening in people with defunctioned colons. Methods An online survey was performed using SurveyMonkey. All members of the Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland were invited by email to participate...
January 1, 2018: Journal of Medical Screening
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29710125/long-term-effectiveness-of-sigmoidoscopy-screening-on-colorectal-cancer-incidence-and-mortality-in-women-and-men-a-randomized-trial
#9
Øyvind Holme, Magnus Løberg, Mette Kalager, Michael Bretthauer, Miguel A Hernán, Eline Aas, Tor J Eide, Eva Skovlund, Jon Lekven, Jörn Schneede, Kjell Magne Tveit, Morten Vatn, Giske Ursin, Geir Hoff
Background: The long-term effects of sigmoidoscopy screening on colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality in women and men are unclear. Objective: To determine the effectiveness of flexible sigmoidoscopy screening after 15 years of follow-up in women and men. Design: Randomized controlled trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00119912). Setting: Oslo and Telemark County, Norway. Participants: Adults aged 50 to 64 years at baseline without prior CRC...
April 24, 2018: Annals of Internal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29707308/the-clinical-value-of-circulating-tumour-cells-ctcs-in-patients-undergoing-pulmonary-metastasectomy-for-metastatic-colorectal-cancer
#10
Masaki Hashimoto, Fumihiro Tanaka, Kazue Yoneda, Teruhisa Takuwa, Ayumi Kuroda, Seiji Matsumoto, Yoshitomo Okumura, Nobuyuki Kondo, Tohru Tsujimura, Takashi Nakano, Seiki Hasegawa
Background: Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are a potential surrogate for distant metastasis and are considered a useful clinical prognostic marker for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). This prospective study evaluated the preoperative CTC count as a prognostic factor for pulmonary metastasectomy in mCRC patients. Methods: Seventy-nine mCRC patients who underwent curative-intent pulmonary metastasectomy were included. Preoperatively, 7.5 mL of peripheral blood from each patient was quantitatively evaluated for CTCs with the CellSearch® system...
March 2018: Journal of Thoracic Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29704170/comparison-of-hematologic-and-other-prognostic-markers-in-metastatic-colorectal-cancer
#11
Joey Mercier, Ioannis A Voutsadakis
BACKGROUND: Associations of thrombocytosis, neutrophilia, and lymphopenia with prognosis have been confirmed in many cancers. This study aims at comparing various prognostic indices based on blood counts in metastatic colorectal adenocarcinomas. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Records from 152 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who were treated in our center were reviewed. Demographic and disease characteristics and hematologic parameters data were extracted and patients were stratified according to their scores of several hematologic ratios...
April 28, 2018: Journal of Gastrointestinal Cancer
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29691364/primary-care-colorectal-cancer-screening-correlates-with-breast-cancer-screening-implications-for-colorectal-cancer-screening-improvement-interventions
#12
Jennifer M Weiss, Nancy Pandhi, Sally Kraft, Aaron Potvien, Pascale Carayon, Maureen A Smith
OBJECTIVE: National colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates have plateaued. To optimize interventions targeting those unscreened, a better understanding is needed of how this preventive service fits in with multiple preventive and chronic care needs managed by primary care providers (PCPs). This study examines whether PCP practices of other preventive and chronic care needs correlate with CRC screening. METHODS: We performed a retrospective cohort study of 90 PCPs and 33,137 CRC screening-eligible patients...
April 25, 2018: Clinical and Translational Gastroenterology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29682740/implications-of-false-positive-results-for-future-cancer-screenings
#13
Glen B Taksler, Nancy L Keating, Michael B Rothberg
BACKGROUND: False-positive cancer screening results may affect a patient's willingness to obtain future screening. METHODS: The authors conducted logistic regression analysis of 450,484 person-years of electronic medical records (2006-2015) in 92,405 individuals aged 50 to 75 years. Exposures were false-positive breast, prostate, or colorectal cancer screening test results (repeat breast imaging or negative breast biopsy ≤3 months after screening mammography, repeat prostate-specific antigen [PSA] test ≤3 months after PSA test result ≥4...
April 23, 2018: Cancer
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29682710/-surgical-skills-in-the-prevention-of-anastomotic-leakage-after-rectal-neoplasm-surgery
#14
Qianqian Shao, Guole Lin
For colorectal surgeons, how to reduce anastomotic leakage after laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery remains to be challenging. We provide a brief discussion regarding the surgical skills required to prevent anastomotic leakage after rectal cancer surgery, such as the following: 1) Low ligation of inferior mesenteric vessel during laparoscopic total mesorectal excision can improve anastomotic tension and blood supply, thus reducing the risk of anastomotic leakage. While high ligation of inferior mesenteric artery results in poor blood supply and high tension in atastomotic site, thus increasing the risk of anastomotic leakage...
2018: Zhonghua Wei Chang Wai Ke za Zhi, Chinese Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29682198/blood-free-circulating-dna-testing-by-highly-sensitive-methylation-assay-to-diagnose-colorectal-neoplasias
#15
Yutaka Suehiro, Shinichi Hashimoto, Shingo Higaki, Ikuei Fujii, Chieko Suzuki, Tomomi Hoshida, Toshihiko Matsumoto, Yuko Yamaoka, Taro Takami, Isao Sakaida, Takahiro Yamasaki
Although methylated TWIST1 is a biomarker of colorectal neoplasia, its detection from serum samples is very difficult by conventional bisulfite-based methylation assays. Therefore, we have developed a new methylation assay that enables counting of even one copy of a methylated gene in a small DNA sample amount without DNA bisulfite treatment. We performed this study to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of serum DNA testing by the new methylation assay in combination with and without the fecal immunochemical test for hemoglobin for the detection of colorectal neoplasia...
March 30, 2018: Oncotarget
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29678513/review-of-blood-based-colorectal-cancer-screening-how-far-are-circulating-cell-free-dna-methylation-markers-from-clinical-implementation
#16
REVIEW
Mai-Britt Worm Ørntoft
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide, and late stages (III-IV) in particular have low 5-year survival rates. Stage shifting by CRC screening programs has proven effective by decreasing morbidity and mortality and in many countries national CRC screening programs have been implemented. Currently, European, Asian, and American authorities recommend screening for CRC using fecal occult blood testing, sigmoidoscopy, or colonoscopy. Because these approaches all have weaknesses (eg, poor compliance, high costs, test invasiveness), much effort has been put into the development of alternative screening approaches, many of which are blood-based...
March 2, 2018: Clinical Colorectal Cancer
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29667892/ct-colonography-performance-for-the-detection-of-polyps-and-cancer-in-adults-%C3%A2-65-years-old-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#17
Perry J Pickhardt, Loredana Correale, Silvia Delsanto, Daniele Regge, Cesare Hassan
OBJECTIVE: We sought to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of published CT colonography (CTC) studies assessing lesion detection in senior-age (≥ 65 years old) cohorts. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a systematic review of CTC studies published between January 1994 and August 2017 containing data on senior-age adults. The primary endpoint was the CTC-positive rate for large colorectal polyps (≥ 10 mm) and masses. Secondary endpoints included lesions ≥ 6 mm, proven advanced neoplasia, and colorectal cancer (CRC)...
April 18, 2018: AJR. American Journal of Roentgenology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29667054/connecting-gastrointestinal-cancer-risk-to-cadmium-and-lead-exposure-in-the-chaoshan-population-of-southeast-china
#18
Xueqiong Lin, Lin Peng, Xijin Xu, Yanrong Chen, Yuling Zhang, Xia Huo
Cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) pose a serious threat to human health because of its carcinogenicity. China ranks first according to the Global Cancer Report for 2014 in newly diagnosed gastrointestinal cancers and cancer deaths. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association of Cd and Pb burden with the risk of gastrointestinal cancers in a hospital-based case-control study from southern regions of China, Chaoshan area. A total of 279 hospitalized patients were recruited in this study, of which 167 were gastrointestinal cancer cases (70 esophageal cancer, 51 gastric cancer, and 46 colorectal cancer), and 112 controls were recruited from two hospitals in the Chaoshan area of southeast China...
April 17, 2018: Environmental Science and Pollution Research International
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29662929/colorectal-cancer-screening-what-is-the-population-s-opinion
#19
Cristina Teixeira, Cláudio Martins, Daniel Trabulo, Suzane Ribeiro, Cláudia Cardoso, João Mangualde, Ricardo Freire, Élia Gamito, Ana Luisa Alves, Isabelle Cremers, Ana Paula Oliveira
Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the first cause of death by cancer in Portugal and mortality has been increasing in the last 30 years. Materials and Methods: During a raising awareness campaign performed by our Gastroenterology Department, in Setúbal, Portugal, an anonymous written questionnaire was developed and presented in order to evaluate the population's knowledge and attitude regarding CRC screening. Results: The following results were reported: 140 persons; mean age 54...
March 2018: GE Portuguese Journal of Gastroenterology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29655462/obesity-thrombotic-risk-and-inflammation-in-cancer
#20
Benjamín Rubio-Jurado, Luz-Ma-Adriana Balderas-Peña, Eduardo E García-Luna, María G Zavala-Cerna, Carlos Riebeling-Navarro, Pedro A Reyes, Arnulfo H Nava-Zavala
Neoplasms exhibits a high incidence and mortality rates due to their complex and commonly overlapping clinical, biochemical, and morphologic profiles influenced by acquired or inherited molecular abnormalities, cell of origin, and level of differentiation. Obesity appears related to ~20% of cancers including endometrial, esophageal, colorectal, postmenopausal breast, prostate, and renal. Several factors other than obesity, i.e., insulin, insulin-like growth factor, sexual hormones, and adipokines may play a potential role in neoplasia...
2018: Advances in Clinical Chemistry
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