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Glucose control critically ill

Peter J Watkinson, Vicki S Barber, J Duncan Young
BACKGROUND: Observational and interventional studies in patients with both acute medical conditions and long-standing diabetes have shown that improved blood glucose control confers a survival advantage or reduces complication rates. Policies of "tight" glycaemic control were rapidly adopted by many general intensive care units (ICUs) worldwide in the mid 00's, even though the results of the studies were not generalizable to mixed medical/surgical ICUs with different intravenous feeding policies...
March 8, 2018: JMIR Research Protocols
W Philip T James
BACKGROUND: This analysis sets out an overview of an IUNS presentation of a European clinician's assessment of the challenges of coping with immediate critical clinical problems and how to use metabolic and a mechanistic understanding of disease when developing nutritional policies. SUMMARY: Critically ill malnourished children prove very sensitive to both mineral and general nutritional overload, but after careful metabolic control they can cope with a high-quality, energy-rich diet provided their initial lactase deficiency and intestinal atrophy are taken into account...
March 8, 2018: Annals of Nutrition & Metabolism
Lvlin Chen, Tiangui Li, Fang Fang, Yu Zhang, Andrew Faramand
BACKGROUND: Hyperglycemia is prevalent in patients in the pediatric intensive care unit. The purpose of this study was to describe the benefits and risks of tight glucose control (TGC) in critically ill children. METHODS: A systemic review and meta-analysis of the literature was carried out on randomized controlled trials of TGC in critically ill children admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit. The databases searched were Medline, Embase, and CENTRAL databases until May 1, 2017...
March 4, 2018: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
Ilse Vanhorebeek, Jan Gunst, Greet Van den Berghe
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: We discuss key studies that have set the scene for the debate on the efficacy and safety of tight glycemic control in critically ill patients, highlighting important differences among them, and describe the ensuing search towards strategies for safer glucose control. RECENT FINDINGS: Differences in level of glycemic control, glucose measurement and insulin administration, expertise, and nutritional management may explain the divergent outcomes of the landmark studies on tight glycemic control in critical illness...
February 26, 2018: Current Diabetes Reports
Marlene Wewalka, Andreas Drolz, Berit Seeland, Mathias Schneeweiss, Monika Schmid, Bruno Schneeweiss, Christian Zauner
BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Hyperglycemia is common in critically ill patients and associated with increased mortality. It has been suggested that different nutrition formulas may beneficially influence glucose levels in surgical intensive care patients. In this prospective randomized clinical cohort study we investigated glucose homeostasis in response to different enteral nutrition formulas in medical critically ill patients. SUBJECTS/METHODS: 60 medical critically ill patients were randomized to receive continuous fat-based (group A, n = 30) or glucose-based enteral nutrition (group B, n = 30) for seven days...
February 19, 2018: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Tingting Han, Xingxing Ren, Dongdong Jiang, Shuang Zheng, Yawen Chen, Huiying Qiu, Peter C Hou, Wei Liu, Yaomin Hu
AIMS: The present study aimed to explore the mechanism of a potential beneficial effect of pre-existing diabetes in acute hyperglycemia during critical illness. METHODS: Pathophysiological changes including blood glucose variability, changes of inflammatory and oxidative stress responses after lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute infection were compared between type 2 diabetic rat model (GK rats) and normal controls (Wistar rats). RESULTS: After LPS injection, Wistar rats showed serious infective symptoms while GK rats did not...
February 11, 2018: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice
Vivek V Shukla, Satvik Bansal, Archana Nimbalkar, Apurva Chapla, Ajay Phatak, Dipen Patel, Somashekhar Nimbalkar
OBJECTIVE: To compare individual efficacy and additive effects of pain control interventions in preterm neonates. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Level-3 University affiliated neonatal intensive care unit. PARTICIPANTS: 200 neonates (26-36 weeks gestational age) requiring heel-stick for bedside glucose assessment. Exclusion criteria were neurologic impairment and critical illness precluding study interventions...
February 9, 2018: Indian Pediatrics
Rodolfo J Galindo, Maya Fayfman, Guillermo E Umpierrez
Perioperative hyperglycemia is common after cardiac surgery, reported in 60% to 90% of patients with diabetes and in approximately 60% of patients without history of diabetes. Many observational and prospective randomized trials in critically-ill cardiac surgery patients support a strong association between hyperglycemia and poor clinical outcome. Despite ongoing debate about the optimal glucose target, there is strong agreement that improved glycemic control reduces perioperative complications.
March 2018: Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinics of North America
Zhongliang Yang, Guoqiang Tao, Meifeng Guo, Baoling Sun, Liang Gong, Yong Ding, Shuming Ye, Weidong Liu, Xiuyun Yang
OBJECTIVE: To explore efficacy and safety of simulated artificial pancreas in modulating stress hyperglycemia in critically ill patients. METHODS: A prospective randomized controlled study was performed. Seventy-two critically ill patients with stress hyperglycemia, aged 18-85 years, acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) score over 15, two consecutive random blood glucose 11.1 mmol/L or higher, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) below 0.065, unable to eat food for 3 days after inclusion, or only accepting parenteral nutrition, admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) in Shanghai Punan Hospital of Pudong New District from January 1st, 2015 to June 30th, 2017 were enrolled...
February 2018: Zhonghua Wei Zhong Bing Ji Jiu Yi Xue
E Andrew Balas, Wendy W Chapman
New scientific knowledge and innovation are often slow to disseminate. In other cases, providers rush into adopting what appears to be a clinically relevant innovation, based on a single clinical trial. In reality, adopting innovations without appropriate translation and repeated testing of practical application is problematic. In this article we provide examples of clinical innovations (for example, tight glucose control in critically ill patients) that were adopted inappropriately and that caused what we term a malfunction...
February 2018: Health Affairs
Amra Sakusic, John C O'Horo, Mikhail Dziadzko, Dziadzko Volha, Rashid Ali, Tarun D Singh, Rahul Kashyap, Ann M Farrell, John D Fryer, Ronald Petersen, Ognjen Gajic, Alejandro A Rabinstein
Long-term cognitive impairment is common in survivors of critical illness. Little is known about the etiology of this serious complication. We sought to summarize current scientific knowledge about potentially modifiable risk factors during intensive care unit (ICU) treatment that may play a substantial role in the development of long-term cognitive impairment. All searches were run on October 1, 2017. The search strategy included Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, Ovid CDR, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effect, Scopus, and Web of Science, and included MeSH headings and keywords related to intensive care, critical care, and cognitive disorders...
January 2018: Mayo Clinic Proceedings
Heyi Su, Zhenhui Guo
So far, there is still lack of effective treatment to control persistent inflammation immunosuppression catabolism syndrome (PICS) appeared generally in those chronic critical illnesses (CCI) patients, restricted by the development of medicine and scientific research nowadays. Because the uncontrolled PICS aggravates continuously, ICU stay of the CCI patients has been obviously prolonging and the late mortality elevates greatly. So exploring effective therapeutic strategies is obviously pressing. With the characteristics in PICS such as that elderly with sepsis or severe trauma tops the list of morbidity, progressing illness is difficult to intervent and various pathology changes occur simultaneously, the fundamental principle of treatment, "Focal screening, early control, joint intervention" must be followed...
December 25, 2017: Zhonghua Wei Chang Wai Ke za Zhi, Chinese Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery
Marina Rabinovich, Jessica Grahl, Emily Durr, Rita Gayed, Katleen Chester, Raymie McFarland, Barbara McLean
BACKGROUND: Insulin infusions are commonly utilized to control hyperglycemia in critically ill patients and decrease hyperglycemia associated complications. Safety concerns have been raised in trials evaluating methods of glycemic control regarding the incidence of hypoglycemia and its relationship to increased mortality. Electronic glycemic management systems (eGMS) may result in less variable blood glucose (BG) control and less hypoglycemia. This study aimed to compare BG control, time in target BG range, and the rate of hypoglycemia when critically ill patients were managed with an insulin infusion guided by paper-based protocol (PBP) versus eGMS...
December 1, 2017: Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Jayshil J Patel, Martin D Rosenthal, Daren K Heyland
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Early enteral nutrition is recommended in critically ill adult patients. The optimal method of administering enteral nutrition remains unknown. Continuous enteral nutrition administration in critically ill patients remains the most common practice worldwide; however, its practice has recently been called into question in favor of intermittent enteral nutrition administration, where volume is infused multiple times per day. This review will outline the key differences between continuous and intermittent enteral nutrition, describe the metabolic responses to continuous and intermittent enteral nutrition administration and outline recent studies comparing continuous with intermittent enteral nutrition administration on outcomes in critically ill adults...
March 2018: Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care
Moritoki Egi, Nana Furushima, Shohei Makino, Satoshi Mizobuchi
Hyperglycemia is commonly observed in critical illness. A landmark large randomized controlled trial (RCT) reported that the incidence of hyperglycemia (blood glucose concentration > 108 mg/dl) was as high as 97.2% in critically ill patients. During the past two decades, a number of RCTs and several meta-analyses and network meta-analyses have been conducted to determine the optimal target for acute glycemic control. The results of those studies suggest that serum glucose concentration would be better to be maintained between 144 and 180 mg/dl...
December 2017: Korean Journal of Anesthesiology
Minkyung Kim, Minjoo Kim, Hana Jeong, Jey Sook Chae, Young Sam Kim, Jae Gil Lee, Younsoo Cho, Jong Ho Lee
BACKGROUND: To investigate natural killer (NK) cell activity, circulating cytokine level and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cytokine production status in critically ill patients. METHODS: Blood samples were collected <24 h after admission from 24 intensive care unit (ICU) patients and 24 age-, sex-, and body mass index (BMI)-matched healthy controls. Serum cytokine concentrations and cytokine production by PBMCs and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated PBMCs were measured...
December 8, 2017: BMC Immunology
S Rijkenberg, S C van Steen, J H DeVries, P H J van der Voort
Subcutaneous continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) may have benefits in achieving glycemic control in critically ill patients. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy and reliability of the FreeStyle Navigator I in critically ill patients and to assess patient related factors influencing the accuracy and reliability. This study is a retrospective analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial conducted in a 20-bed mixed intensive care unit. Analytical accuracy, clinical accuracy and reliability were assessed against arterial blood glucose samples as reference...
December 7, 2017: Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing
Xu Li, Yanquan Ma, Tianlu Chen, Jie Tang, Xiaochun Ma
BACKGROUND: Critically ill patients are at high risk of hypoglycemia and are particularly vulnerable to unrecognized hypoglycemia. Close blood glucose monitoring is therefore crucial. There are several options to conduct frequent blood glucose measurement and a number of conditions in intensive care unit patients may affect the accuracy of blood glucose measurement. The aim of the study was to compare the accuracy of capillary glucose by bedside glucometer with arterial samples by bedside glucometer and arterial samples by blood gas analyzer in critically ill patients through a prospective case-control study...
November 2017: American Journal of the Medical Sciences
Alessio Molfino, Francesco Alessandri, Paola Mosillo, Donatella Dell'Utri, Alessio Farcomeni, Maria Ida Amabile, Alessandro Laviano
BACKGROUND & AIM: Phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) reduces insulin sensitivity. Since critically ill patients present insulin resistance, we aimed at assessing the role of PTEN expression on glucose homeostasis and clinical outcome in patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) and receiving artificial nutrition. METHODS: Observational, single-center study conducted in one ICU in Rome, Italy on adult patients hospitalized for trauma. Plasma glucose levels and its variability were recorded in patients receiving artificial nutrition...
November 4, 2017: Clinical Nutrition: Official Journal of the European Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
Seyed Hamed Hosseini Dehkordi, Jeanine Albu, Emad F Aziz, Eyal Herzog
Inpatient hyperglycemia has been associated with increased morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Optimal control of blood glucose (BG) levels using insulin infusion protocols has been shown to improve clinical outcomes. Protocols have been developed to prescribe a safe and effective rate of insulin infusion for optimal control of BG levels; however, a major obstacle in their implementation is their complexity. We have revised and updated our previously published pathway for the management of hyperglycemia, which introduces the "wheel" concept for insulin dosing...
December 2017: Critical Pathways in Cardiology
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