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Adapted sport

Samuel L Buckner, Matthew B Jessee, Scott J Dankel, Kevin T Mattocks, Takashi Abe, Jeremy P Loenneke
Resistance exercise is typically performed to increase both muscle size and strength and is regularly incorporated into training programs for sports performance. Presumably, the exercise would be expected to increase the force producing capabilities of skeletal muscle, which may have subsequent influence on various sports related abilities. Interestingly, few studies are designed to examine sports related benefits of resistance exercise while including a proper control group to account for adaptations to simply performing the sports related task...
April 2018: Medical Hypotheses
Anthony R Bain, Ivan Drvis, Zeljko Dujic, David B MacLeod, Philip N Ainslie
NEW FINDINGS: What is the topic of this review? This review provides an up-to-date assessment of the physiology involved with extreme static dry-land breath holding in trained apneists. What advances does it highlight? We specifically highlight the recent findings involved with the cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and metabolic function during a maximal breath hold in elite apneists. ABSTRACT: Breath hold related activities have been performed for centuries, but only recently within the last ∼30 years has it emerged as an increasingly popular competitive sport...
March 7, 2018: Experimental Physiology
Thomas Hilberg
Sports and exercise therapy becomes more and more integrated in the treatment plan of different diseases. Although the benefits of this therapy are of high quality evidence, e.g. in cardiovascular diseases, no concepts of sports therapy are available as a treatment option for rare diseases.During the last eighteen years, we analyzed the situation as well as necessity, and developed a model, contents and the concept of the "Programmed Sports Therapy (PST)" for the treatment of PwH (people with haemophilia) as our model of rare disease...
March 5, 2018: Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
Jon S Patricios, Clare L Ardern, Michael David Hislop, Mark Aubry, Paul Bloomfield, Carolyn Broderick, Patrick Clifton, Ruben J Echemendia, Richard G Ellenbogen, Éanna Cian Falvey, Gordon Ward Fuller, Julie Grand, Dallas Hack, Peter Rex Harcourt, David Hughes, Nathan McGuirk, Willem Meeuwisse, Jeffrey Miller, John T Parsons, Simona Richiger, Allen Sills, Kevin B Moran, Jenny Shute, Martin Raftery
The 2017 Berlin Concussion in Sport Group Consensus Statement provides a global summary of best practice in concussion prevention, diagnosis and management, underpinned by systematic reviews and expert consensus. Due to their different settings and rules, individual sports need to adapt concussion guidelines according to their specific regulatory environment. At the same time, consistent application of the Berlin Consensus Statement's themes across sporting codes is likely to facilitate superior and uniform diagnosis and management, improve concussion education and highlight collaborative research opportunities...
March 2, 2018: British Journal of Sports Medicine
Gabriele Mascherini, Cristian Petri, Giorgio Galanti
BACKGROUND: Cardiac adaptation to intense physical training is determined by many factors. Differences between the sexes in the left ventricle parameters are well established, however, both sport activity and body composition seem to reduce them. In order to better explain some heart modifications, a first approach was to eliminate the fat mass from the indexing of the left ventricular parameters. Fat free mass also contains the extracellular mass which does not represent a metabolically active compartment...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness
Daniel Boullosa, Sebastian Del Rosso, David G Behm, Carl Foster
While there is strong support of the usefulness of post-activation potentiation (PAP) phenomenon in power demanding sports, the role that PAP could play in endurance sports has received less attention. The aim of this review is to present evidence for a better understanding of PAP in endurance athletes; and to discuss the physiological basis and methodological aspects necessary for better practices and designing further studies. A search for relevant articles on PAP and endurance trained athletes was carried out using Medline and ISI Web of Knowledge databases...
March 1, 2018: European Journal of Sport Science
Stefan F Fischerauer, Mojtaba Talaei-Khoei, Rens Bexkens, David C Ring, Luke S Oh, Ana-Maria Vranceanu
BACKGROUND: Fear avoidance can play a prominent role in maladaptive responses to an injury. In injured athletes, such pain-related fear or fear avoidance behavior may have a substantial influence on the recovery process. Specifically, it may explain why some are able to reach their preinjury abilities, whereas others are unable to return to sport. QUESTIONS/PURPOSES: (1) Is fear avoidance in athletes associated with decreased physical function after injury? (2) To what degree is fear avoidance associated with athletes' pain intensity? METHODS: In a cross-sectional study, we recruited injured athletes-defined as patients with sports-related injury, weekly engagement in sport activities, participation in competitive events as part of a team or club, self-identification as an athlete, and a desire to return to sport after recovery-from an orthopaedic sports medicine center at a major urban university hospital...
February 14, 2018: Clinical Orthopaedics and related Research
Suzanne Robinson, Jessica L Fraser-Thomas, Robert Balogh, Yona Lunsky, Jonathan A Weiss
It is important to understand factors associated with sport participation for youth with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). With a sample of 414 Special Olympics (SO) athletes, this study examined how frequently involved athletes differ from other youth who are less involved in SO. Results showed that frequently involved athletes are older, have more sport-specific parental support, stronger athlete-coach relationships, and more positive SO experiences than other athletes. These factors were predictive of SO involvement, even after controlling for athlete characteristics, including behavior problems and adaptive behavior...
March 2018: American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Davy Laroche, Morgane Mangin, Delphine Besson, Alexandre Naaim, Anaïs Gouteron, Jean-Marie Casillas
BACKGROUND: Although the initial anaerobic component of exercise adaptation is unavoidable, no specific functional test is available for use in routine non-sporting practice to evaluate it. OBJECTIVE: To assess the bioenergetic and biomechanical properties of the Short and Fast Step Test (SFST), which consists of walking up and down a step as many times as possible in 1minute and to analyse its ability to explore the initial anaerobic component of effort in comparison to a reference self-paced step test...
February 19, 2018: Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
Hamish McGorm, Llion A Roberts, Jeff S Coombes, Jonathan M Peake
Historically, heat has been used in various clinical and sports rehabilitation settings to treat soft tissue injuries. More recently, interest has emerged in using heat to pre-condition muscle against injury. The aim of this narrative review was to collate information on different types of heat therapy, explain the physiological rationale for heat therapy, and to summarise and evaluate the effects of heat therapy before, during and after muscle injury, immobilisation and strength training. Studies on skeletal muscle cells demonstrate that heat attenuates cellular damage and protein degradation (following in vitro challenges/insults to the cells)...
February 22, 2018: Sports Medicine
Scott Sinnett, Cj Maglinti, Alan Kingstone
BACKGROUND: Grunting is pervasive in many athletic contests, and empirical evidence suggests that it may result in one exerting more physical force. It may also distract one's opponent. That grunts can distract was supported by a study showing that it led to an opponent being slower and more error prone when viewing tennis shots. An alternative explanation was that grunting masks the sound of a ball being hit. The present study provides evidence against this alternative explanation by testing the effect of grunting in a sport-mixed martial arts-where distraction, rather than masking, is the most likely mechanism...
2018: PloS One
Julian D Egan-Shuttler, Rohan Edmonds, Stephen J Ives
(248 words)Heart rate (HR) variability (HRV) is a reliable indicator of cardiac parasympathetic activity and has been used in athletic populations to measure training adaptations. To date, there is limited research showing whether HRV is practical in youth female athletes and rowers during short periods of overload training. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the practicality of HRV in documenting training responses during a period of overload training in youth female rowers...
February 15, 2018: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Carl Alexander James, Florencio Tenllado Vallejo, Melvin Kantebeen, Saro Farra
Current on-court assessments of aerobic fitness in squash are not designed to yield a wealth of physiological data. Moreover, tests may require complex computer equipment or involve simulated racket strokes, which are difficult to standardize at high intensities. This study investigated the validity and reliability of a squash-specific fitness test which can yield both a standalone performance score, as well as pertinent physiological markers such as V[Combining Dot Above]O2max, the lactate turnpoint and oxygen cost, in a sport-specific environment...
February 14, 2018: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Gerardo Bosco, Alex Rizzato, Richard E Moon, Enrico M Camporesi
Man's experience and exploration of the underwater environment has been recorded from ancient times and today encompasses large sections of the population for sport enjoyment, recreational and commercial purpose, as well as military strategic goals. Knowledge, respect and maintenance of the underwater world is an essential development for our future and the knowledge acquired over the last few dozen years will change rapidly in the near future with plans to establish secure habitats with specific long-term goals of exploration, maintenance and survival...
2018: Frontiers in Psychology
Samuel G Impey, Mark A Hearris, Kelly M Hammond, Jonathan D Bartlett, Julien Louis, Graeme L Close, James P Morton
Deliberately training with reduced carbohydrate (CHO) availability to enhance endurance-training-induced metabolic adaptations of skeletal muscle (i.e. the 'train low, compete high' paradigm) is a hot topic within sport nutrition. Train-low studies involve periodically training (e.g., 30-50% of training sessions) with reduced CHO availability, where train-low models include twice per day training, fasted training, post-exercise CHO restriction and 'sleep low, train low'. When compared with high CHO availability, data suggest that augmented cell signalling (73% of 11 studies), gene expression (75% of 12 studies) and training-induced increases in oxidative enzyme activity/protein content (78% of 9 studies) associated with 'train low' are especially apparent when training sessions are commenced within a specific range of muscle glycogen concentrations...
February 16, 2018: Sports Medicine
Daniel Hamacher, Tobias Krebs, Guido Meyer, Astrid Zech
During competition, kayak athletes must optimally adapt to environmental factors (e.g. wind, waves) to achieve peak performance. However, the ability to adapt to such perturbations has never been assessed in kayak paddling. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to evaluate the local dynamic stability in sports technique of youth sprint kayak athletes. In a cross-sectional study, 14 healthy male athletes were recruited from an elite youth sprint kayak squad. During an incremental kayak ergometer test, mean power, heart rates and local dynamic technique stability of hands, arms, trunk and paddle were registered and the association with the athletes 2000 m free-water times were estimated using mixed models...
February 15, 2018: European Journal of Sport Science
Bob Murray, Christine Rosenbloom
The ability of athletes to train day after day depends in large part on adequate restoration of muscle glycogen stores, a process that requires the consumption of sufficient dietary carbohydrates and ample time. Providing effective guidance to athletes and others wishing to enhance training adaptations and improve performance requires an understanding of the normal variations in muscle glycogen content in response to training and diet; the time required for adequate restoration of glycogen stores; the influence of the amount, type, and timing of carbohydrate intake on glycogen resynthesis; and the impact of other nutrients on glycogenesis...
February 10, 2018: Nutrition Reviews
Andrew M Watson, Carol Coutinho, Kristin Haraldsdottir, Stacey Brickson, Warren Dunn, Marlowe Eldridge
PURPOSE: To evaluate the influence of physical maturity on the changes in ventricular morphology and function with sport training in female youth athletes. METHODS: Thirty-two female athletes (age 13-18 years) underwent height and weight measurement and 2-D echocardiographic evaluation immediately prior to, and following, a 20-week soccer season. Pre- and post-season left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVEDD), end-diastolic volume (LVEDV), ejection fraction (LVEF), stroke volume (LVSV), mass (LVM), and posterior wall thickness (LVPWT), right ventricular end-diastolic diameter (RVEDD), end-diastolic area (RVEDA), and fractional area change (RVFAC), and interventricular septal thickness (IVST) were compared...
February 12, 2018: European Journal of Sport Science
Jared A Wolfe, Daniel L Christensen, Timothy C Mauntel, Brett D Owens, Lance E LeClere, Jonathan F Dickens
Introduction: Shoulder instability is one of the most common pathologies seen by the orthopedic sports medicine surgeon. With a uniquely young, high-demand patient population in the U.S. Military, the incidence of shoulder instability is remarkably more common than the civilian population. As such, military orthopedic surgeons and sports medicine and shoulder specialists have developed a unique understanding and experience of shoulder instability. The historical advances of shoulder instability in the military have been instrumental in understanding the epidemiology, evaluation, pathology, treatment of first-time shoulder subluxations and dislocations, operative and non-operative treatment options, arthroscopic and open stabilization methods, management of the in-season athlete, treatment of combined and circumferential labral pathology, and associated pathology...
February 6, 2018: Military Medicine
Stephan van der Zwaard, Franck Brocherie, Bengt L G Kom, Grégoire P Millet, Louise Deldicque, Willem J van der Laarse, Olivier Girard, Richard T Jaspers
In this study, we investigate adaptations in muscle oxidative capacity, fiber size and oxygen supply capacity in team-sport athletes after six repeated-sprint sessions in normobaric hypoxia or normoxia combined with 14 days of chronic normobaric hypoxic exposure. Lowland elite field hockey players resided at simulated altitude ({greater than or equal to}14 h∙d-1 at 2800-3000 m) and performed regular training plus six repeated-sprint sessions in normobaric hypoxia (3000 m; LHTLH; n=6) or normoxia (0 m, LHTL; n=6) or lived at sea level with regular training only (LLTL; n=6)...
February 8, 2018: Journal of Applied Physiology
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