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High flow nasal

Donna Franklin, Franz E Babl, Luregn J Schlapbach, Ed Oakley, Simon Craig, Jocelyn Neutze, Jeremy Furyk, John F Fraser, Mark Jones, Jennifer A Whitty, Stuart R Dalziel, Andreas Schibler
BACKGROUND: High-flow oxygen therapy through a nasal cannula has been increasingly used in infants with bronchiolitis, despite limited high-quality evidence of its efficacy. The efficacy of high-flow oxygen therapy through a nasal cannula in settings other than intensive care units (ICUs) is unclear. METHODS: In this multicenter, randomized, controlled trial, we assigned infants younger than 12 months of age who had bronchiolitis and a need for supplemental oxygen therapy to receive either high-flow oxygen therapy (high-flow group) or standard oxygen therapy (standard-therapy group)...
March 22, 2018: New England Journal of Medicine
Joshua M Gleason, Bill R Christian, Erik D Barton
Patients requiring emergency airway management may be at greater risk of acute hypoxemic events because of underlying lung pathology, high metabolic demands, insufficient respiratory drive, obesity, or the inability to protect their airway against aspiration. Emergency tracheal intubation is often required before complete information needed to assess the risk of procedural hypoxia is acquired (i.e., arterial blood gas level, hemoglobin value, or chest radiograph). During pre-oxygenation, administering high-flow nasal oxygen in addition to a non-rebreather face mask can significantly boost the effective inspired oxygen...
March 2018: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
Yigal Helviz, Sharon Einav
This article is one of ten reviews selected from the Annual Update in Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine 2018. Other selected articles can be found online at . Further information about the Annual Update in Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine is available from .
March 20, 2018: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
C Guillot, C Le Reun, H Behal, J Labreuche, M Recher, A Duhamel, S Leteurtre
BACKGROUND: Viral bronchiolitis is the leading cause of hospitalization in children during the first 12 months of life. There is evidence to support the use of noninvasive ventilation in bronchiolitis. A recent respiratory management of bronchiolitis is the use of high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) therapy. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the use of HFNC as the first-line treatment for children with severe bronchiolitis and the secondary objective was to identify factors for HFNC therapy failure...
March 15, 2018: Archives de Pédiatrie: Organe Officiel de la Sociéte Française de Pédiatrie
Li Huang, Calum T Roberts, Brett J Manley, Louise S Owen, Peter G Davis, Kim M Dalziel
OBJECTIVE: To compare the cost-effectiveness of 2 common "noninvasive" modes of respiratory support for infants born preterm. STUDY DESIGN: An economic evaluation was conducted as a component of a multicenter, randomized control trial from 2013 to 2015 enrolling infants born preterm at ≥28 weeks of gestation with respiratory distress, <24 hours old, who had not previously received endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation or surfactant. The economic evaluation was conducted from a healthcare sector perspective and the time horizon was from birth until death or first discharge...
March 15, 2018: Journal of Pediatrics
Tsutomu Nomura, Munetaka Ushio, Kenji Kondo, Shigeru Kikuchi
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this research is to examine the changes in nasal airflow dynamics before and after the nasal perforation repair. METHODS: Three dimensional (3D) models of the nasal cavity before and after septal perforation repair was reconstructed using preoperative and postoperative computed tomography (CT) images of a patient. The numerical simulation was carried out using ANSYS CFX V15.0. Pre- and post-operative models were compared by their velocity, pressure (P), pressure gradient (PG), wall shear (WS), shear strain rate (SSR) and turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) in three plains...
March 13, 2018: Auris, Nasus, Larynx
Yu Onodera, Ryo Akimoto, Hiroto Suzuki, Masayuki Okada, Masaki Nakane, Kaneyuki Kawamae
BACKGROUND: Although clinical studies of the high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) and its effect on positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) have been done, the washout effect has not been well evaluated. Therefore, we made an experimental respiratory model to evaluate the respiratory physiological effect of HFNC. METHODS: An airway model was made by a 3D printer using the craniocervical 3D-CT data of a healthy 32-year-old male. CO2 was infused into four respiratory lung models (normal-lung, open- and closed-mouth models; restrictive- and obstructive-lung, open-mouth models) to maintain the partial pressure of end-tidal CO2 (PET CO2 ) at 40 mmHg...
March 15, 2018: Intensive Care Medicine Experimental
M Creaney, R M Moriarty, M Milner, C Murphy
Congenital muscular dystrophies are characterised by progressive skeletal muscle weakness from birth or early infancy. Maternal respiratory compromise, joint contractures and presence of spinal instrumentation or fusion are some of the anaesthetic challenges that may be encountered in the obstetric setting. The choice of anaesthetic technique for surgical delivery needs to be considered on an individual basis. Multi-disciplinary involvement is paramount to optimise peripartum care and outcomes. In this case report, we present the use of dexmedetomidine, humidified high-flow nasal oxygen, rocuronium and sugammadex in the anaesthetic management of a wheelchair-bound, non-invasive bilevel positive airway pressure ventilation-dependent parturient with congenital muscular dystrophy, who was presenting for caesarean section...
February 9, 2018: International Journal of Obstetric Anesthesia
Andrew G Miller, Michael A Gentle, Lisa M Tyler, Natalie Napolitano
BACKGROUND: High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) use has greatly increased in recent years. In non-neonatal pediatric patients, there are limited data available to guide HFNC use, and clinical practice may vary significantly. The goal of this study was to evaluate current HFNC practice by surveying practicing pediatric respiratory therapists. METHODS: A survey instrument was posted on the American Association for Respiratory Care's AARConnect online social media platform in March 2017...
March 13, 2018: Respiratory Care
Mihir Sarkar, Rajasree Sinha, Satyabrata Roychowdhoury, Sobhanman Mukhopadhyay, Pramit Ghosh, Kalpana Dutta, Shibarjun Ghosh
Background: Early initiation of appropriate noninvasive respiratory support is utmost important intervention to avoid mechanical ventilation in severe bronchiolitis. Aim: This study aims to compare noninvasive continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) and hot humidified high-flow nasal cannulae (HHHFNC) as modes of respiratory support in infants with severe bronchiolitis. Methods: Prospective, randomized, open-label pilot study done in a tertiary-care hospital Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU)...
February 2018: Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine
C Overbergh, S Installe, A Boudewyns, K Van Hoorenbeeck, S L Verhulst
Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is being increasingly used in children of all age ranges. The limited number of commercially available masks especially in infants and young children may complicate its use and compliance. In this report, we describe our experience with the use of the Optiflow™ (Fisher and Paykel Healthcare) Nasal Cannula attached to a regular CPAP device in the setting of chronic CPAP use. This interface consists of a nasal cannula and was originally designed for the delivery of high-flow oxygen therapy...
April 2018: Sleep Medicine
Anıl Er, Aykut Çağlar, Fatma Akgül, Emel Ulusoy, Hale Çitlenbik, Durgül Yılmaz, Murat Duman
AIM: High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) is a new treatment option for pediatric respiratory distress and we aimed to assess early predictive factors of unresponsiveness to HFNC therapy in a pediatric emergency department (ED). METHOD: Patients who presented with respiratory distress and were treated by HFNC, were included. The age, gender, weight, medical history, diagnosis, vital signs, oxygen saturation/fraction of inspired oxygen (SpO2 /FiO2 ) ratio, modified Respiratory Distress Assessment Instrument (mRDAI) scores, medical interventions, duration of HFNC therapy, time to escalation, adverse effects, and laboratory test results were obtained from medical and nursing records...
March 12, 2018: Pediatric Pulmonology
James Barger, Matthew Siow, Michael Kader, Katherine Phillips, Girish Fatterpekar, David Kleinberg, David Zagzag, Chandranath Sen, John G Golfinos, Richard Lebowitz, Dimitris G Placantonakis
Background: While effective for the repair of large skull base defects, the Hadad-Bassagasteguy nasoseptal flap increases operative time and can result in a several-week period of postoperative crusting during re-mucosalization of the denuded nasal septum. Endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary adenoma resection is generally not associated with large dural defects and high-flow cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks requiring extensive reconstruction. Here, we present the posterior nasoseptal flap as a novel technique for closure of skull defects following endoscopic resection of pituitary adenomas...
2018: Surgical Neurology International
Brett J Manley, Calum T Roberts, Dag H Frøisland, Lex W Doyle, Peter G Davis, Louise S Owen
OBJECTIVE: To identify clinical and demographic variables that predict nasal high-flow (nHF) treatment failure when used as a primary respiratory support for preterm infants. STUDY DESIGN: This secondary analysis used data from a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial comparing nHF with continuous positive airway pressure as primary respiratory support in preterm infants 28-36 completed weeks of gestation. Treatment success or failure with nHF was determined using treatment failure criteria within the first 72 hours after randomization...
March 9, 2018: Journal of Pediatrics
Tim Leon Ullrich, Christoph Czernik, Christoph Bührer, Gerd Schmalisch, Hendrik Stefan Fischer
BACKGROUND: Heated humidification is paramount during neonatal high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) therapy. However, there is little knowledge about the influence of flow rate and mouth leak on oropharyngeal humidification and temperature. METHODS: The effect of the Optiflow HFNC on oropharyngeal gas conditioning was investigated at flow rates of 4, 6 and 8 L min-1 with and without mouth leak in a bench model simulating physiological oropharyngeal air conditions during spontaneous breathing...
March 9, 2018: World Journal of Pediatrics: WJP
L Nip, M Tan, K L Whitcroft, R Gupta, T S Leung, P Andrews
BACKGROUND: The correlation between objective and subjective nasal obstruction is poor, and dissatisfaction rates after surgery for nasal obstruction are high. Accordingly, novel assessment techniques may be required. This survey aimed to determine patient experience and preferences for the measurement of nasal obstruction. METHOD: Prospective survey of rhinology patients. RESULTS: Of 72 questionnaires distributed, 60 were completed (response rate of 83 per cent)...
March 7, 2018: Journal of Laryngology and Otology
Elie Azoulay, Virginie Lemiale, Djamel Mokart, Saad Nseir, Laurent Argaud, Frédéric Pène, Loay Kontar, Fabrice Bruneel, Kada Klouche, François Barbier, Jean Reignier, Anabelle Stoclin, Guillaume Louis, Jean-Michel Constantin, Julien Mayaux, Florent Wallet, Achille Kouatchet, Vincent Peigne, Pierre Perez, Christophe Girault, Samir Jaber, Johanna Oziel, Martine Nyunga, Nicolas Terzi, Lila Bouadma, Christine Lebert, Alexandre Lautrette, Naike Bigé, Jean-Herlé Raphalen, Laurent Papazian, Antoine Rabbat, Michael Darmon, Sylvie Chevret, Alexandre Demoule
BACKGROUND: Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is the leading reason for intensive care unit (ICU) admission in immunocompromised patients. High-flow nasal oxygen (HFNO) therapy is an alternative to standard oxygen. By providing warmed and humidified gas, HFNO allows the delivery of higher flow rates via nasal cannula devices, with FiO2 values of nearly 100%. Benefits include alleviation of dyspnea and discomfort, decreased respiratory distress and decreased mortality in unselected patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure...
March 5, 2018: Trials
Hilde Brenne, Kristine Hermansen Grunewaldt, Turid Follestad, Håkon Bergseng
AIM: We measured electrical activity of the diaphragm (Edi) to compare the breathing effort in preterm infants during weaning from respiratory support with high-flow nasal cannulae (HFNC) or nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP). METHODS: This randomised cross-over study was carried out at St Olav's University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway from December 2013 to June 2015. We gave 21 preterm infants weighing at least 1,000 grams HFNC 6 l/min for four hours and nCPAP 3 cmH2 O for four hours with a one-hour wash-out period...
March 5, 2018: Acta Paediatrica
Jingliang Dong, Yidan Shang, Lin Tian, Kiao Inthavong, Jiyuan Tu
Rats have been widely used as surrogates for evaluating the health effects of inhaled airborne particulate matter. To provide a thorough understanding of particle transport and deposition mechanisms in the rat nasal airway, this article presents a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study of particle exposure in a realistic rat nasal passage under a resting flow condition. Particles covering a diameter range from 1 nm to 4 µm were passively released in front of the rat's breathing zone, and the Lagrangian particle tracking approach was used to calculate individual particle trajectories...
February 28, 2018: Inhalation Toxicology
Francesco Montecchia, Fabio Midulla, Paola Papoff
Measuring work of breathing (WOB) is an intricate task during high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) therapy because the continuous unidirectional flow toward the patient makes pneumotachography technically difficult to use. We implemented a new method for measuring WOB based on a differential pneumotachography (DP) system, equipped with one pneumotachograph inserted in the HFNC circuit and another connected to a monitoring facemask, combined with a leak correction algorithm (LCA) that corrects flow measurement errors arising from leakage around the monitoring facemask...
February 24, 2018: Medical Engineering & Physics
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