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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28645982/a-multicentre-randomised-controlled-non-inferiority-trial-comparing-nasal-high-flow-with-nasal-continuous-positive-airway-pressure-as-primary-support-for-newborn-infants-with-early-respiratory-distress-born-in-australian-non-tertiary-special-care-nurseries
#1
Brett J Manley, Calum T Roberts, Gaston R B Arnolda, Ian M R Wright, Louise S Owen, Kim M Dalziel, Jann P Foster, Peter G Davis, Adam G Buckmaster
INTRODUCTION: Nasal high-flow (nHF) therapy is a popular mode of respiratory support for newborn infants. Evidence for nHF use is predominantly from neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). There are no randomised trials of nHF use in non-tertiary special care nurseries (SCNs). We hypothesise that nHF is non-inferior to nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) as primary support for newborn infants with respiratory distress, in the population cared for in non-tertiary SCNs. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The HUNTER trial is an unblinded Australian multicentre, randomised, non-inferiority trial...
June 23, 2017: BMJ Open
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28643443/national-high-flow-nasal-cannula-and-bronchiolitis-survey-highlights-need-for-further-research-and-evidence-based-guidelines
#2
Paula Sokuri, Paula Heikkilä, Matti Korppi
AIM: High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) therapy provides non-invasive respiratory support for infant bronchiolitis and its use has increased following good clinical experiences. This national study describes HFNC use in Finland during a severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) epidemic. METHODS: A questionnaire on using HFNC for infant bronchiolitis during the 2015-2016 RSV epidemic was sent to the head physicians of 18 Finnish children's hospitals providing inpatient care for infants: 17 hospitals answered, covering 77...
June 23, 2017: Acta Paediatrica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28629636/nasal-high-flow-oxygen-therapy-in-the-ward-setting-a-prospective-observational-study
#3
Alison M Pirret, Susan F Takerei, Claire L Matheson, Meghan Kelly, Wharewaina Strickland, Joanne Harford, Nicola E Jepsen, Lisa J Welsh, Chloe P A Allan
BACKGROUND: Whilst research demonstrates the benefits of nasal high flow oxygen in the intensive care setting, limited literature exists on its benefits in ward patients. OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the use of nasal high flow oxygen in adult ward patients with respiratory failure or at risk of respiratory deterioration. Primary outcome was an improvement in pulmonary function as indicated by decreases in respiratory and heart rates and an increase in arterial oxygen saturation via pulse oximetry...
June 16, 2017: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing: the Official Journal of the British Association of Critical Care Nurses
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28622152/use-of-transnasal-humidified-rapid-insufflation-ventilatory-exchange-for-emergent-surgical-tracheostomy-a-case-report
#4
Neel Desai, Anna Fowler
Transnasal humidified rapid-insufflation ventilatory exchange (THRIVE) is a novel airway technique that utilizes high-flow humidified nasal oxygen. It can extend apnea time and maintain oxygen saturation. Here we report the use of THRIVE in a 35-year-old man who required emergent surgical tracheostomy for a clinically relevant compromised airway secondary to acute supraglottic and glottic pathology. Intravenous sedation resulted in hypoventilation close to apnea. THRIVE maintained oxygen saturation for 40 minutes until transient desaturation developed after complete airway obstruction...
June 15, 2017: A & A Case Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28619016/clinical-application-of-a-novel-endoscopic-mask-a-randomized-controlled-multi-center-trial-in-patients-undergoing-awake-fiberoptic-bronchoscopic-intubation
#5
Tianxiao Zou, Zhenling Huang, Xiaoxue Hu, Guangyu Cai, Miao He, Shanjuan Wang, Ping Huang, Bin Yu
BACKGROUND: Awake fiberoptic bronchoscopic tracheal intubation is usually regarded as an effective method in the management of predicted difficult airway. Hypoxia during awake nasal fiberoptic bronchoscopic intubation leads to discontinuation of the procedure, prolonged manipulation time and increased risk of severe complications. The main aim of the study was to test whether the novel endoscopic mask is helpful for hypoxia during the intubation. METHODS: This was a randomized, controlled, multi-center study...
June 15, 2017: BMC Anesthesiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28606907/first-line-support-for-assistance-in-breathing-in-children-first-abc-protocol-for-a-multicentre-randomised-feasibility-trial-of-non-invasive-respiratory-support-in-critically-ill-children
#6
Padmanabhan Ramnarayan, Paula Lister, Troy Dominguez, Parviz Habibi, Naomi Edmonds, Ruth Canter, Paul Mouncey, Mark J Peters
INTRODUCTION: Over 18 000 children are admitted annually to UK paediatric intensive care units (PICUs), of whom nearly 75% receive respiratory support (invasive and/or non-invasive). Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has traditionally been used to provide first-line non-invasive respiratory support (NRS) in PICUs; however, high-flow nasal cannula therapy (HFNC), a novel mode of NRS, has recently gained popularity despite the lack of high-quality trial evidence to support its effectiveness...
June 12, 2017: BMJ Open
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28603625/physiological-impact-of-high-flow-nasal-cannula-therapy-on-postextubation-acute-respiratory-failure-after-pediatric-cardiac-surgery-a-prospective-observational-study
#7
Naohiro Shioji, Tatsuo Iwasaki, Tomoyuki Kanazawa, Kazuyoshi Shimizu, Tomohiko Suemori, Kentaro Sugimoto, Yasutoshi Kuroe, Hiroshi Morimatsu
BACKGROUND: Reintubation after pediatric cardiac surgery is associated with a high rate of mortality. Therefore, adequate respiratory support for postextubation acute respiratory failure (ARF) is important. However, little is known about the physiological impact of high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) therapy on ARF after pediatric cardiac surgery. Our working hypothesis was that HFNC therapy for postextubation ARF after pediatric cardiac surgery improves hemodynamic and respiratory parameters...
2017: Journal of Intensive Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28601264/high-flow-nasal-cannula-versus-conventional-oxygen-therapy-in-emergency-department-patients-with-cardiogenic-pulmonary-edema-a%C3%A2-randomized-controlled-trial
#8
Onlak Makdee, Apichaya Monsomboon, Usapan Surabenjawong, Nattakarn Praphruetkit, Wansiri Chaisirin, Tipa Chakorn, Chairat Permpikul, Phakphoom Thiravit, Tanyaporn Nakornchai
STUDY OBJECTIVE: High-flow nasal cannula is a new method for delivering high-flow supplemental oxygen for victims of respiratory failure. This randomized controlled trial compares high-flow nasal cannula with conventional oxygen therapy in emergency department (ED) patients with cardiogenic pulmonary edema. METHODS: We conducted an open-label randomized controlled trial in the ED of Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand. Patients aged 18 years or older with cardiogenic pulmonary edema were randomly assigned to receive either conventional oxygen therapy or high-flow nasal cannula...
June 7, 2017: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28600234/rescsrf-algorithm-to-automatically-extract-cheyne-stokes-respiration-features-from-respiratory-signals
#9
Faizan Javed, Henrik Fox
OBJECTIVE: Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) related features are significantly associated with cardiac dysfunction. Scoring of these features is labor-intensive and time-consuming. To automate the scoring process, an algorithm (ResCSRF) has been developed to extract these features from nocturnal measurement of respiratory signals. METHODS: ResCSRF takes 4 signals (nasal flow, thorax, abdomen and finger oxygen saturation) as input. It first detects CSR cycles and then calculates the respiratory features [cyclelength (CL), lung-to-periphery circulation time (LPCT) and time to peak flow (TTPF)]...
June 5, 2017: IEEE Transactions on Bio-medical Engineering
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28588119/high-flow-nasal-cannula-utilization-in-pediatric-critical-care
#10
Kristen D Coletti, Dayanand N Bagdure, Linda K Walker, Kenneth E Remy, Jason W Custer
BACKGROUND: High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) is increasingly utilized in pediatrics, delivering humidified air and oxygen for respiratory conditions causing hypoxia and distress. In the neonatal ICU, it has been associated with better tolerance, lower complications, and lower cost. Few data exist regarding indications for use and the epidemiology of disease/pathology that warrants HFNC in the pediatric ICU. METHODS: This study is a retrospective cohort study of patients admitted to a tertiary children's hospital pediatric ICU and placed on HFNC from October 1, 2011 to October 31, 2013...
June 6, 2017: Respiratory Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28588117/aerosol-delivery-through-adult-high-flow-nasal-cannula-with-heliox-and-oxygen
#11
Patricia A Dailey, Robert Harwood, Kyle Walsh, James B Fink, Tina Thayer, Greg Gagnon, Arzu Ari
BACKGROUND: Heliox (helium-oxygen mixture) has been shown to reduce turbulence and improve aerosol delivery in a range of clinical settings. We questioned whether heliox as compared with oxygen via high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) would affect aerosol delivery. We hypothesized that heliox would have a significant effect on aerosol delivery as compared with oxygen with both quiet and distressed breathing patterns. METHODS: A vibrating mesh nebulizer was placed at the inlet of a humidifier via HFNC with small adult cannula distal to the heated-wire circuit with prongs placed into simulated nares with a T-shaped trap and absolute filter connected to a breath simulator set to adult quiet and distressed breathing parameters...
June 6, 2017: Respiratory Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28575343/maintaining-oxygenation-with-high-flow-nasal-cannula-during-emergent-awake-surgical-tracheostomy
#12
R Ffrench-O'Carroll, K Fitzpatrick, W R Jonker, M Choo, O Tujjar
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 1, 2017: British Journal of Anaesthesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28574647/robust-non-dimensional-estimators-to-assess-the-nasal-airflow-in-health-and-disease
#13
E Sanmiguel-Rojas, M A Burgos, C Del Pino, M A Sevilla-García, F Esteban-Ortega
There are significant variations of both human nose shapes and airflow patterns inside nasal cavities, so it is difficult to provide a comprehensive medical identification using a universal template for what otolaryngologists consider normal breathing at rest. In addition, airflow patterns present even more random characteristics in diseased nasal cavities. In order to give a medical assessment to differentiate the nasal cavities in health and disease, we propose two non-dimensional estimators obtained from both medical images and computational fluid dynamics (CFD)...
June 2, 2017: International Journal for Numerical Methods in Biomedical Engineering
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28572979/complex-effects-of-high-flow-nasal-cannula-therapy-on-hemodynamics-in-the-pediatric-patient-after-cardiac-surgery
#14
EDITORIAL
Yu Inata, Muneyuki Takeuchi
BACKGROUND: The high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) system has been widely used for children in various clinical settings. However, the physiological and clinical impact of HFNC therapy on the pediatric patient with respiratory distress after cardiac surgery has not been thoroughly investigated. MAIN BODY OF THE ABSTRACT: It seems logical to use HFNC as a primary therapy for post-extubation respiratory failure after congenital heart surgery, in which low cardiac output syndrome and upper airway obstruction are commonly encountered; the HFNC therapy alleviates the work of breathing and large negative swings of intrathoracic pressure, which in turn helps to decrease the systemic ventricular afterload...
2017: Journal of Intensive Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28572120/burden-of-disease-and-change-in-practice-in-critically-ill-infants-with-bronchiolitis
#15
Luregn J Schlapbach, Lahn Straney, Ben Gelbart, Janet Alexander, Donna Franklin, John Beca, Jennifer A Whitty, Subodh Ganu, Barry Wilkins, Anthony Slater, Elizabeth Croston, Simon Erickson, Andreas Schibler
Bronchiolitis represents the most common cause of non-elective admission to paediatric intensive care units (ICUs).We assessed changes in admission rate, respiratory support, and outcomes of infants <24 months with bronchiolitis admitted to ICU between 2002 and 2014 in Australia and New Zealand.During the study period, bronchiolitis was responsible for 9628 (27.6%) of 34 829 non-elective ICU admissions. The estimated population-based ICU admission rate due to bronchiolitis increased by 11.76 per 100 000 each year (95% CI 8...
June 2017: European Respiratory Journal: Official Journal of the European Society for Clinical Respiratory Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28555461/high-flow-nasal-cannulae-for-respiratory-support-in-adult-intensive-care-patients
#16
REVIEW
Amanda Corley, Claire M Rickard, Leanne M Aitken, Amy Johnston, Adrian Barnett, John F Fraser, Sharon R Lewis, Andrew F Smith
BACKGROUND: High-flow nasal cannulae (HFNC) deliver high flows of blended humidified air and oxygen via wide-bore nasal cannulae and may be useful in providing respiratory support for adult patients experiencing acute respiratory failure in the intensive care unit (ICU). OBJECTIVES: We evaluated studies that included participants 16 years of age and older who were admitted to the ICU and required treatment with HFNC. We assessed the safety and efficacy of HFNC compared with comparator interventions in terms of treatment failure, mortality, adverse events, duration of respiratory support, hospital and ICU length of stay, respiratory effects, patient-reported outcomes, and costs of treatment...
May 30, 2017: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28546373/noninvasive-respiratory-support-in-infants-and-children
#17
Katherine L Fedor
CPAP and noninvasive ventilation (NIV) offer an alternative to intubation and mechanical ventilation in the treatment of acute and chronic respiratory disorders commonly encountered in infants and children. There are many distinct challenges associated with the application, management, and safety of CPAP and NIV in the pediatric population. This review attempts to identify indications, contraindications, management strategies, and safety measures associated with the application of CPAP or NIV delivery in children...
June 2017: Respiratory Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28544665/humidified-high-flow-nasal-cannula-oxygen-in-bronchiolitis-reduces-need-for-invasive-ventilation-but-not-intensive-care-admission
#18
Chong Tien Goh, Lynette J Kirby, David N Schell, Jonathan R Egan
AIM: To describe the changes to paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) admission patterns and ventilation requirements for children with bronchiolitis following the introduction of humidified high-flow nasal cannula oxygen outside the PICU. METHODS: Retrospective study comparing patients <24 months of age with a discharge diagnosis of bronchiolitis admitted to the PICU. A comparison was made between those before humidified high-flow nasal cannula oxygen use (year 2008) to those immediately following the introduction of humidified high-flow nasal cannula oxygen use (year 2011) and those following further consolidation of humidified high-flow nasal cannula oxygen use outside the PICU (year 2013)...
May 23, 2017: Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28544539/intensive-care-unit-admissions-and-ventilation-support-in-infants-with-bronchiolitis
#19
Ed Oakley, Vi Chong, Meredith Borland, Jocelyn Neutze, Natalie Phillips, David Krieser, Stuart Dalziel, Andrew Davidson, Susan Donath, Kim Jachno, Mike South, Amanda Fry, Franz E Babl
OBJECTIVES: To describe the rate of intensive care unit (ICU) admission, type of ventilation support provided and risk factors for ICU admission in infants with bronchiolitis. DESIGN: Retrospective review of hospital records and Australia and New Zealand Paediatric Intensive Care (ANZPIC) registry data for infants 2-12 months old admitted with bronchiolitis. SETTING: Seven Australian and New Zealand hospitals. These infants were prospectively identified through the comparative rehydration in bronchiolitis (CRIB) study between 2009 and 2011...
May 19, 2017: Emergency Medicine Australasia: EMA
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28544511/computational-fluid-dynamics-evaluation-of-posterior-septectomy-as-a-viable-treatment-option-for-large-septal-perforations
#20
Bradley A Otto, Chengyu Li, Alexander A Farag, Benjamin Bush, Jillian P Krebs, Ryan D Hutcheson, Kanghyun Kim, Bhakthi Deshpande, Kai Zhao
BACKGROUND: Numerous surgical techniques exist to treat nasal septal perforation (NSP). The surgical closure of large NSPs (>2 cm) is still challenging. Posterior septectomy has been reported as a simple alternative to treat large NSP, yet its mechanisms for symptom relief are not clear, and if failed, its consequence cannot be easily reversed. METHODS: Ten NSP patients were recruited: 5 underwent posterior septectomy and 5 underwent conventional flap or button repair...
May 23, 2017: International Forum of Allergy & Rhinology
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