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Integrated information theory consciousness

Ryan B Scott, Jason Samaha, Ron Chrisley, Zoltan Dienes
While theories of consciousness differ substantially, the 'conscious access hypothesis', which aligns consciousness with the global accessibility of information across cortical regions, is present in many of the prevailing frameworks. This account holds that consciousness is necessary to integrate information arising from independent functions such as the specialist processing required by different senses. We directly tested this account by evaluating the potential for associative learning between novel pairs of subliminal stimuli presented in different sensory modalities...
March 12, 2018: Cognition
Hyoungkyu Kim, Anthony G Hudetz, Joseph Lee, George A Mashour, UnCheol Lee
The integrated information theory (IIT) proposes a quantitative measure, denoted as Φ, of the amount of integrated information in a physical system, which is postulated to have an identity relationship with consciousness. IIT predicts that the value of Φ estimated from brain activities represents the level of consciousness across phylogeny and functional states. Practical limitations, such as the explosive computational demands required to estimate Φ for real systems, have hindered its application to the brain and raised questions about the utility of IIT in general...
2018: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
Andrea Lavazza, Marcello Massimini
Organoids are three-dimensional biological structures grown in vitro from different kinds of stem cells that self-organise mimicking real organs with organ-specific cell types. Recently, researchers have managed to produce human organoids which have structural and functional properties very similar to those of different organs, such as the retina, the intestines, the kidneys, the pancreas, the liver and the inner ear. Organoids are considered a great resource for biomedical research, as they allow for a detailed study of the development and pathologies of human cells; they also make it possible to test new molecules on human tissue...
February 28, 2018: Journal of Medical Ethics
Marek Pokropski
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2018: Frontiers in Psychology
Maor Zeev-Wolf, Yair Dor-Ziderman, Abraham Goldstein, Omer Bonne, Eitan G Abramowitz
One of the most challenging questions regarding the nature and neural basis of consciousness is the embodied dimension of the phenomenon, that is, feeling located within the body and viewing the world from that spatial perspective. Current theories in neurophysiology highlight the active role of multisensory and sensorimotor integration in supporting self-location and self-perspective, and propose the right temporal-parietal-junction (rTPJ) as a key area for such function. These theories are based mainly on findings from two experimental paradigms: manipulation of bottom-up multisensory information integration regarding one's body location (full-body illusion), or direct and invasive manipulation disrupting brain activity at the rTPJ...
August 31, 2017: Cortex; a Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System and Behavior
Søren Brier
Charles S. Peirce developed a process philosophy featuring a non-theistic agapistic evolution from nothingness. It is an Eastern inspired alternative to the Western mechanical ontology of classical science also by the American transcendentalists. Advaitism and Buddhism are the two most important Eastern philosophical traditions that encompass scientific knowledge and the idea of spontaneous evolutionary development. This article attempts to show how Peirce's non-mechanical triadic semiotic process theory can embrace the quantum field view better than the mechanical and information views in a theory of the emergence of consciousness...
September 19, 2017: Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology
Katie E Garrison, Ian M Handley
Individuals often form more reasonable judgments from complex information after a period of distraction vs. deliberation. This phenomenon has been attributed to sophisticated unconscious thought during the distraction period that integrates and organizes the information (Unconscious Thought Theory; Dijksterhuis and Nordgren, 2006). Yet, other research suggests that experiential processes are strengthened during the distraction (relative to deliberation) period, accounting for the judgment and decision benefit...
2017: Frontiers in Psychology
Maria Laura Blefari, Roberto Martuzzi, Roy Salomon, Javier Bello-Ruiz, Bruno Herbelin, Andrea Serino, Olaf Blanke
Exteroceptive bodily signals (including tactile, proprioceptive and visual signals) are important information contributing to self-consciousness. Moreover, prominent theories proposed that visceral signals about internal bodily states are equally or even more important for self-consciousness. Neuroimaging studies have described several brain regions which process signals related to bodily self-consciousness (BSC) based on the integration of exteroceptive signals (e.g. premotor cortex, angular gyrus, supramarginal gyrus and extrastriate body area), and that another brain region, the insula/operculum which is involved in interoception and interoceptive awareness, processes signals critical for self-awareness...
March 30, 2017: European Journal of Neuroscience
Antonino Naro, Antonino Leo, Alfredo Manuli, Antonino Cannavò, Alessia Bramanti, Placido Bramanti, Rocco Salvatore Calabrò
Awareness generation and modulation may depend on a balanced information integration and differentiation across default mode network (DMN) and external awareness networks (EAN). Neuromodulation approaches, capable of shaping information processing, may highlight residual network activities supporting awareness, which are not detectable through active paradigms, thus allowing to differentiate chronic disorders of consciousness (DoC). We studied aftereffects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) by applying graph theory within canonical frequency bands to compare the markers of these networks in the electroencephalographic data from 20 patients with DoC...
March 8, 2017: Neuroscience
Javeria A Hashmi, Marco L Loggia, Sheraz Khan, Lei Gao, Jieun Kim, Vitaly Napadow, Emery N Brown, Oluwaseun Akeju
BACKGROUND: A clear understanding of the neural basis of consciousness is fundamental to research in clinical and basic neuroscience disciplines and anesthesia. Recently, decreased efficiency of information integration was suggested as a core network feature of propofol-induced unconsciousness. However, it is unclear whether this finding can be generalized to dexmedetomidine, which has a different molecular target. METHODS: Dexmedetomidine was administered as a 1-μg/kg bolus over 10 min, followed by a 0...
March 2017: Anesthesiology
Ravinder Jerath, Shannon M Cearley, Vernon A Barnes, Elizabeth Nixon-Shapiro
The role of the physiological processes involved in human vision escapes clarification in current literature. Many unanswered questions about vision include: 1) whether there is more to lateral inhibition than previously proposed, 2) the role of the discs in rods and cones, 3) how inverted images on the retina are converted to erect images for visual perception, 4) what portion of the image formed on the retina is actually processed in the brain, 5) the reason we have an after-image with antagonistic colors, and 6) how we remember space...
November 2016: Medical Hypotheses
Diane K Dao, Adeline L Goss, Andrew S Hoekzema, Lauren A Kelly, Alexander A Logan, Sanjiv D Mehta, Utpal N Sandesara, Michelle R Munyikwa, Horace M DeLisser
Many efforts to design introductory "cultural competence" courses for medical students rely on an information delivery (competence) paradigm, which can exoticize patients while obscuring social context, medical culture, and power structures. Other approaches foster a general open-minded orientation, which can remain nebulous without clear grounding principles. Medical educators are increasingly recognizing the limitations of both approaches and calling for strategies that reenvision cultural competence training...
March 2017: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
(no author information available yet)
"Universal design provides a blueprint for maximum inclusion of all people" [7]. This statement is now nearly 20 years old. The present collection of papers from the 3rd International Conference on Universal Design (UD 2016) is testament to the fact that Universal Design is now benefitting from a climate that is more knowledgeable about, and possibly more accommodating of, individual differences between people. However, there are still many open issues, and much to be learnt from exchanging experiences between all stakeholders interested in Universal Design, be they policy makers, practitioners or researchers...
2016: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics
Theodora Banica, D Samuel Schwarzkopf
It remains unknown to what extent the human visual system interprets information about complex scenes without conscious analysis. Here we used visual masking techniques to assess whether illusory contours (Kanizsa shapes) are perceived when the inducing context creating this illusion does not reach awareness. In the first experiment we tested perception directly by having participants discriminate the orientation of an illusory contour. In the second experiment, we exploited the fact that the presence of an illusory contour enhances performance on a spatial localization task...
2016: PloS One
Tomer Fekete, Cees van Leeuwen, Shimon Edelman
A computational theory of consciousness should include a quantitative measure of consciousness, or MoC, that (i) would reveal to what extent a given system is conscious, (ii) would make it possible to compare not only different systems, but also the same system at different times, and (iii) would be graded, because so is consciousness. However, unless its design is properly constrained, such an MoC gives rise to what we call the boundary problem: an MoC that labels a system as conscious will do so for some-perhaps most-of its subsystems, as well as for irrelevantly extended systems (e...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
William Marshall, Jaime Gomez-Ramirez, Giulio Tononi
Integrated information (Φ) is a measure of the cause-effect power of a physical system. This paper investigates the relationship between Φ as defined in Integrated Information Theory and state differentiation ([Formula: see text]), the number of, and difference between potential system states. Here we provide theoretical justification of the relationship between Φ and [Formula: see text], then validate the results using a simulation study. First, we show that a physical system in a state with high Φ necessarily has many elements and specifies many causal relationships...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
Luca Puviani, Sidita Rama
Despite growing scientific interest in the placebo effect and increasing understanding of neurobiological mechanisms, theoretical modeling of the placebo response remains poorly developed. The most extensively accepted theories are expectation and conditioning, involving both conscious and unconscious information processing. However, it is not completely understood how these mechanisms can shape the placebo response. We focus here on neural processes which can account for key properties of the response to substance intake...
2016: Scientific Reports
Eivind Engebretsen, Kristin Heggen, Sietse Wieringa, Trisha Greenhalgh
The evidence-based practice and evidence-based medicine (EBM) movements have promoted standardization through guideline development methodologies based on systematic reviews and meta-analyses of best available research. EBM has challenged clinicians to question their reliance on practical reasoning and clinical judgement. In this paper, we argue that the protagonists of EBM position their mission as reducing uncertainty through the use of standardized methods for knowledge evaluation and use. With this drive towards uniformity, standardization and control comes a suspicion towards intuition, creativity and uncertainty as integral parts of medical practice...
December 2016: Medicine, Health Care, and Philosophy
Giulio Tononi, Melanie Boly, Marcello Massimini, Christof Koch
In this Opinion article, we discuss how integrated information theory accounts for several aspects of the relationship between consciousness and the brain. Integrated information theory starts from the essential properties of phenomenal experience, from which it derives the requirements for the physical substrate of consciousness. It argues that the physical substrate of consciousness must be a maximum of intrinsic cause-effect power and provides a means to determine, in principle, the quality and quantity of experience...
July 2016: Nature Reviews. Neuroscience
Sai Venkatesh Balasubramanian, Gomathi Balasubramanian, Ganapathy Ramanathan
Today, the world's ever-changing lifestyles demand a reliable, comprehensive system of integrative medicine with minimal side effects. One of the most prominent candidates for such a system is music, an enjoyable health care approach, and in response to the need for that system, the present article formulates one that is music based. Specifically, the authors have explored the physician-patient interaction, developing a model of that interaction within the context of music therapy. That model is based on ancient Ayurvedic principles and on research from modern physics and biology, such as that on quantum consciousness, chaos theory, the statistical theory of communication, information theory, and neurodynamics...
April 2016: Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine
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