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March 22, 2018: Nature
Jennifer Oates
AIM: The aim of this article is to present selected findings from a doctoral study on the subjective well-being and subjective experience of mental health problems in UK mental health nurses. Here the concept of 'nurses' well-being' is explored. METHOD: Data were drawn from a survey of 237 mental health nurses about their mental health and well-being and from interviews with 27 mental health nurses with personal experience of mental health problems and high subjective well-being...
March 22, 2018: Nursing Management (Harrow)
Keith Gray, Rebecca Wilde, Karl Shutes
AIM: This article offers nurse managers guidance on analysing, managing and addressing a potentially dissatisfied nursing workforce, focusing on three priority shortage specialties: emergency care, paediatrics and cardiology. The aim of the study was to explore to what extent registered nurses and healthcare assistants, referred to collectively here as 'nursing staff', are satisfied with teamworking opportunities, continuing professional development (CPD) opportunities and workplace autonomy...
March 22, 2018: Nursing Management (Harrow)
Anna Ławniczek-Wałczyk, Marcin Cyprowski, Małgorzata Gołofit-Szymczak, Angelina Wójcik-Fatla, Violetta Zając, Rafał L Górny
BACKGROUND: <sup></sup>In recent years, the number of people suffering from diseases caused by fungi has been increasing. However, knowledge of the biodiversity of fungal pathogens in the work environment is still insufficient. The aim of this work was to evaluate the exposure to fungi being disseminated in the air of workplaces contaminated with organic dust of plant and animal origin. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Bioaerosol samples were collected at 3 occupational settings (poultry farm, biomass burning power plant and wastewater treatment plant) using button samplers...
March 21, 2018: Medycyna Pracy
Yao-Hui Huang, Yao-Yu Lin, Shih-Kai Lee, Ming-Feng Lee, Ching-Lan Esther Lin
BACKGROUND: The ideology of recovery addresses the autonomy of patients with mental illness and their ability to reconstruct a normal life. Empirical knowledge of this process of recovery and related factors remains unclear. PURPOSE: To assess the process of recovery and related factors in patients with mental illness. METHODS: This cross-sectional, correlational study was conducted on a convenience sample in a psychiatric hospital. Two-hundred and fifty patients with mental illness were recruited and were assessed using 3 instruments: Questionnaire about the Process of Recovery (QPR), Perceived Psychiatric Stigma Scale (PPSS), and Personal and Social Performance Scale (PSP)...
April 2018: Hu Li za Zhi the Journal of Nursing
Antonis Targoutzidis
The cost of lost output is a major component of the total cost of illness estimates, especially those for the cost of workplace accidents and diseases. The two main methods for estimating this output, namely the human capital and the friction cost method, lead to very different results, particularly for cases of long-term absence, which makes the choice of method a critical dilemma. Two hidden assumptions, one for each method, are identified in this paper: for human capital method, the assumption that had the accident not happened the individual would remain alive, healthy and employed until retirement, and for friction cost method, the assumption that any created vacancy is covered by an unemployed person...
March 21, 2018: European Journal of Health Economics: HEPAC: Health Economics in Prevention and Care
Gunjan Kumar, Josyula G Prasuna, Gaurav Seth
Background: The issue of menstrual hygiene is inadequately acknowledged in our nation. The use of sanitary pads and washing the genital area are essential practices for good menstrual hygiene. Poor menstrual hygiene may lead to itching or rashes in the perineal region, bad odor, and sometimes, major complications such as pelvic inflammatory disease and toxic shock syndrome. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess the knowledge and practice of menstrual hygiene among reproductive age group women...
October 2017: Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care
Guang Hwi Kim, Hee Sung Lee, Sung Won Jung, Jae Gwang Lee, June Hee Lee, Kyung Jae Lee, Joo Ja Kim
Background: In modern society, the scale of the service industry is continuously expanding, and the number of service workers is increasing. Correspondingly, physical and mental problems related to emotional labor are becoming a major social problem. In this study, we investigated the relationship between emotional labor, workplace violence, and depressive symptoms in female bank employees, which is a typical service industry. Methods: In this study, the Korean Emotional Labor Scale (K-ELS) and Korean Workplace Violence Scale (K-WVS) were distributed to 381 female workers in their 20s at a bank in Seoul, Korea...
2018: Annals of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Nanette L Yragui, Caitlin A Demsky, Leslie B Hammer, Sarah Van Dyck, Moni B Neradilek
Purpose: The present study examined the moderating effects of family-supportive supervisor behaviors (FSSB) on the relationship between two types of workplace aggression (i.e., patient-initiated physical aggression and coworker-initiated psychological aggression) and employee well-being and work outcomes. Methodology: Data were obtained from a field sample of 417 healthcare workers in two psychiatric hospitals. Hypotheses were tested using moderated multiple regression analyses...
April 2017: Journal of Business and Psychology
James Laurence, Katharina Schmid, Miles Hewstone
This study advances the current literature investigating the relationship between contextual out-group exposure, inter-group attitudes and the role of inter-group contact. Firstly, it introduces the concept of contact-valence into this relationship; that is, whether contact is experienced positively or negatively. Secondly, it presents a comparative analysis of how processes of out-group exposure and frequency of (valenced) contact affect prejudice across both neighbourhoods and workplaces. Applying path analysis modelling to a nationally-representative sample of white British individuals in England, we demonstrate, across both contexts, that increasing out-group exposure is associated with higher rates of both positively- and negatively-valenced contact...
2018: Social Indicators Research
Aimée Gayed, Josie S Milligan-Saville, Jennifer Nicholas, Bridget T Bryan, Anthony D LaMontagne, Allison Milner, Ira Madan, Rafael A Calvo, Helen Christensen, Arnstein Mykletun, Nicholas Glozier, Samuel B Harvey
Managers are in an influential position to make decisions that can impact on the mental health and well-being of their employees. As a result, there is an increasing trend for organisations to provide managers with training in how to reduce work-based mental health risk factors for their employees. A systematic search of the literature was conducted to identify workplace interventions for managers with an emphasis on the mental health of employees reporting directing to them. A meta-analysis was performed to calculate pooled effect sizes using the random effects model for both manager and employee outcomes...
March 21, 2018: Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Åsa Svedmark, Martin Björklund, Charlotte K Häger, Johan Nilsson Sommar, Jens Wahlström
Introduction: The aim was to evaluate if pain, disability, and work productivity are influenced by physical and psychosocial work exposures as well as by stress, up to 1 year after a randomized controlled trial treatment intervention, and to determine whether any such association differed between treatment and control groups. Methods: Ninety-seven working women suffering non-specific neck pain (n = 67 treatment group, n = 30 control group) were followed from end of treatment intervention and at 9- and 15-month follow-ups, respectively...
March 17, 2018: Annals of Work Exposures and Health
Jesse D Berman, Thomas M Peters, Kirsten A Koehler
Objectives: To design a method that uses preliminary hazard mapping data to optimize the number and location of sensors within a network for a long-term assessment of occupational concentrations, while preserving temporal variability, accuracy, and precision of predicted hazards. Methods: Particle number concentrations (PNCs) and respirable mass concentrations (RMCs) were measured with direct-reading instruments in a large heavy-vehicle manufacturing facility at 80-82 locations during 7 mapping events, stratified by day and season...
March 17, 2018: Annals of Work Exposures and Health
João Paulo Belini Jacques, Renata Perfeito Ribeiro, Alessandro Rolim Scholze, Maria José Quina Galdino, Júlia Trevisan Martins, Benedita Gonçalves de Assis Ribeiro
OBJECTIVE: To compare occupational stress levels of nurse staff working in the surgical unit before and after the intervention "wellness room". METHOD: Quasi-experimental study with a sample of 60 nurse staff working in a surgical unit of a teaching hospital in the Southern Region of Brazil. The intervention was conducted in a room in the workplace for six months and consisted of sections of aesthetic care, relaxation, lectures and workshops to reduce occupational stress...
2018: Revista Brasileira de Enfermagem
Kenneth Jay, Lars L Andersen
Work-related musculoskeletal pain and stress are both highly prevalent in the working environment and relate well to the biopsychosocial model. While the onset of musculoskeletal pain is often dependent on the biological element of the biopsychosocial model, chronic pain is often influenced by psychological and social factors. Similarly, stress is also influenced by biological, psychological, and social factors. This study investigates the possibility of social capital being a buffer for stress and musculoskeletal pain in a group of female laboratory technicians...
March 2018: Medicine (Baltimore)
Rimen Lim
Sleep disturbance is a significant issue for patients in intensive care units (ICUs), which can affect their health and recovery from illness. Therefore, it is important to consider ways to address sleep disturbance in these settings. One strategy that has been suggested is the use of 'quiet time' interventions, which involve a defined period where there is a reduction in controllable light and sound, and where interruptions at the patient's bedside are minimised. AIM: To determine the effectiveness of quiet time interventions in improving patients' sleep quality in ICUs; to investigate other potential clinical benefits of quiet time interventions; and to consider the effect of incorporating open visitation when implementing quiet time interventions...
March 21, 2018: Nursing Standard
Rebecca Udemans, Marie-Louise Stokes, Louise Rigby, Priya Khanna, Jonathan Christiansen
AIM: The Royal Australasian College of Physicians is renewing its specialty training programs and shifting towards competency-based medical education. Our aim is to improve the quality and rigor of training and graduate outcomes, and promote high standards of physician practice to serve the health of patients, families, and communities in a changing healthcare environment. METHODS: We are progressing holistic change and multiple educational innovations in a complex environment...
March 21, 2018: Medical Teacher
Fareen Zaver, Nicole Battaglioli, William Denq, Anne Messman, Arlene Chung, Michelle Lin, Emberlynn L Liu
Introduction: Burnout, depression, and suicidality among residents of all specialties have become a critical focus for the medical education community, especially among learners in graduate medical education. In 2017 the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) updated the Common Program Requirements to focus more on resident wellbeing. To address this issue, one working group from the 2017 Resident Wellness Consensus Summit (RWCS) focused on wellness program innovations and initiatives in emergency medicine (EM) residency programs...
March 2018: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
Jacob Arnold, Jennifer Tango, Ian Walker, Chris Waranch, Joshua McKamie, Zafrina Poonja, Anne Messman
Introduction: Physicians are at much higher risk for burnout, depression, and suicide than their non-medical peers. One of the working groups from the May 2017 Resident Wellness Consensus Summit (RWCS) addressed this issue through the development of a longitudinal residency curriculum to address resident wellness and burnout. Methods: A 30-person (27 residents, three attending physicians) Wellness Curriculum Development workgroup developed the curriculum in two phases...
March 2018: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
Zerihun Ataro, Abraham Geremew, Fekadu Urgessa
Background: Occupational exposure to chemicals in garages causes a wide range of biological effects, depending upon the level and duration of exposure. In Ethiopia, there have been few studies conducted to assess the exposure of garage workers to chemicals. Preceding studies have not explored the effect of working in garage on blood pressure and hematological parameters. Therefore, this study aimed to assess differences in blood pressure and hematological parameters among garage workers compared to the Haramaya University community, Harar, eastern Ethiopia...
2018: Risk Management and Healthcare Policy
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