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Vicky Stergiopoulos, Agnes Gozdzik, Vachan Misir, Anna Skosireva, Aseefa Sarang, Jo Connelly, Adam Whisler, Kwame McKenzie
BACKGROUND: Little is known about the effectiveness of Housing First (HF) among ethnic minority groups, despite its growing popularity for homeless adults experiencing mental illness. This randomized controlled trial tests the effectiveness of a HF program using rent supplements and intensive case management, enhanced by anti-racism and anti-oppression practices for homeless adults with mental illness from diverse ethnic minority backgrounds. METHODS: This unblinded pragmatic field trial was carried out in community settings in Toronto, Canada...
October 21, 2016: BMC Public Health
Naomi Priest, Laura Thompson, Tamara Mackean, Alison Baker, Elizabeth Waters
OBJECTIVE: Australian Indigenous children experience some of the most substantial health inequalities globally. In this context, research regarding their health and well-being has overemphasised physical illnesses with limited exploration of a diverse range of dimensions and determinants, particularly those based on Indigenous holistic understandings of health and well-being. This deficit-based approach has thus missed many strengths and assets of Indigenous children. This research aimed to gain insight into the perspectives of Indigenous children about their health and well-being in an urban setting in Australia...
October 21, 2016: Ethnicity & Health
Shaniece Criss, Dahiana Rodriguez, Roberta E Goldman
Our qualitative study examined how stresses of daily life affected substance use and perceived risk among Black and Hispanic adolescents. We conducted 11 focus groups with students aged 13-25 in public and alternative schools in Providence, Rhode Island, using Bourdieu's Social Practice theoretical approach to guide questioning and data analysis. Despite participants' frequent marijuana use, they perceived the emphasis society places on substance use as misguided, obfuscating the persistence of more critical problems such as stress and reduced opportunity resulting from neighborhood violence, poor schools, financial difficulties, and home troubles...
2016: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
Herenia P Lawrence, Jaime Cidro, Sonia Isaac-Mann, Sabrina Peressini, Marion Maar, Robert J Schroth, Janet N Gordon, Laurie Hoffman-Goetz, John R Broughton, Lisa Jamieson
This study assessed links between racism and oral health outcomes among pregnant Canadian Aboriginal women. Baseline data were analyzed for 541 First Nations (94.6%) and Métis (5.4%) women in an early childhood caries preventive trial conducted in urban and on-reserve communities in Ontario and Manitoba. One-third of participants experienced racism in the past year determined by the Measure of Indigenous Racism Experience. In logistic regressions, outcomes significantly associated with incidents of racism included: wearing dentures, off-reserve dental care, asked to pay for dental services, perceived need for preventive care, flossing more than once daily, having fewer than 21 natural teeth, fear of going to dentist, never received orthodontic treatment and perceived impact of oral conditions on quality of life...
2016: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
Margie Steffens, Lisa Jamieson, Kostas Kapellas
Discrimination is a very real facet of Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (ATSI) life. Paradies has detailed the strong links between racism and chronic stress and the influence this may have on general health, confounding the pre-supposed notion that ATSI populations are more genetically predisposed to chronic diseases. For example a genetic predisposition promoting central adipose storage in populations with recent (in evolutionary terms) changes to hunter-gatherer dietary patterns is thought to contribute to the higher rates of diabetes seen in ATSI and other Native populations...
2016: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
Jeanne L Alhusen, Kelly M Bower, Elizabeth Epstein, Phyllis Sharps
INTRODUCTION: This article presents an integrative review of the literature examining the relationship between racial discrimination and adverse birth outcomes. METHODS: Searches for research studies published from 2009 to 2015 were conducted using PubMed, CINAHL, Scopus, PsycINFO, Web of Science, and Embase. Articles were assessed for potential inclusion using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) 2009 framework. RESULTS: Fifteen studies met criteria for review...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Midwifery & Women's Health
Tyler B Mason, Ralitsa S Maduro, Valerian J Derlega, Desi S Hacker, Barbara A Winstead, Jacqueline E Haywood
Objective: This research focused on how race-based rejection sensitivity (RS-Race) and components of racial identity intensify negative psychological reactions to an incident of vicarious racism. We examined how these individual difference variables directly and/or indirectly predicted African American students' reactions to the trial of George Zimmerman in the killing of the African American teenager, Trayvon Martin. Method: In Study 1, 471 African American students completed measures of RS-Race, thought intrusions about the Zimmerman trial, and outcome variables (negative affect about the Zimmerman trial and forgiveness for Mr...
October 13, 2016: Cultural Diversity & Ethnic Minority Psychology
Rachel R Hardeman, Eduardo M Medina, Katy B Kozhimannil
On July 7, 2016, in our Minneapolis community, Philando Castile was shot and killed by a police officer in the presence of his girlfriend and her 4-year-old daughter. Acknowledging the role of racism in Castile’s death, Minnesota Governor Mark Dayton asked rhetorically, "Would this have happened if..
October 12, 2016: New England Journal of Medicine
Paul Youngbin Kim, Dana L Kendall, Hee-Sun Cheon
The present study is an empirical investigation of cultural mistrust as a mediator in the association between racial microaggressions and mental health (anxiety, depression, and well-being) in a sample of Asian American college students. In addition, we explored the role of cultural mistrust as a mediator in the association between racial microaggressions and attitudes toward seeking professional help. Asian American participants (N = 156) were recruited from 2 institutions located in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States...
August 15, 2016: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry
Sarah MacLean, Ross Hengsen, Raelene Stephens
INTRODUCTION AND AIMS: This article identifies factors that participants in a study based in an Australian regional centre believed to be critical to understanding and responding to crystal methamphetamine (ice) use among Aboriginal people. DESIGN AND METHODS: The study entailed a participatory methodology involving a university and an Aboriginal community controlled organisation. Semi-structured interviews conducted with ice users (n = 14), family members (n = 6) and workers (n = 6) were analysed thematically...
October 11, 2016: Drug and Alcohol Review
Annette J Browne, Colleen Varcoe, Josée Lavoie, Victoria Smye, Sabrina T Wong, Murry Krause, David Tu, Olive Godwin, Koushambhi Khan, Alycia Fridkin
BACKGROUND: Structural violence shapes the health of Indigenous peoples globally, and is deeply embedded in history, individual and institutional racism, and inequitable social policies and practices. Many Indigenous communities have flourished, however, the impact of colonialism continues to have profound health effects for Indigenous peoples in Canada and internationally. Despite increasing evidence of health status inequities affecting Indigenous populations, health services often fail to address health and social inequities as routine aspects of health care delivery...
October 4, 2016: BMC Health Services Research
Carol Davy, Stephen Harfield, Alexa McArthur, Zachary Munn, Alex Brown
BACKGROUND: Indigenous peoples often find it difficult to access appropriate mainstream primary health care services. Securing access to primary health care services requires more than just services that are situated within easy reach. Ensuring the accessibility of health care for Indigenous peoples who are often faced with a vast array of additional barriers including experiences of discrimination and racism, can be complex. This framework synthesis aimed to identify issues that hindered Indigenous peoples from accessing primary health care and then explore how, if at all, these were addressed by Indigenous health care services...
September 30, 2016: International Journal for Equity in Health
Mark R Hobbs, Susan Mb Morton, Polly Atatoa-Carr, Stephen R Ritchie, Mark G Thomas, Rajneeta Saraf, Carol Chelimo, Anthony Harnden, Carlos A Camargo, Cameron C Grant
AIM: Infectious disease (ID) hospitalisation rates are increasing in New Zealand (NZ), especially in pre-school children, and Māori and Pacific people. We aimed to identify risk factors for ID hospitalisation in infancy within a birth cohort of NZ children, and to identify differences in risk factors between ethnic groups. METHODS: We investigated an established cohort of 6846 NZ children, born in 2009-2010, with linkage to a national data set of hospitalisations...
October 7, 2016: Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health
Candice Lys, Carmen H Logie, Nancy MacNeill, Charlotte Loppie, Lisa V Dias, Renée Masching, Dionne Gesink
INTRODUCTION: Indigenous youth are disproportionately represented in new HIV infection rates in Canada. Current and historical contexts of colonisation and racism, disconnection from culture and land, as well as intergenerational trauma resulting from the legacy of residential schools are social drivers that elevate exposure to HIV among Indigenous peoples. Peer-education and arts-based interventions are increasingly used for HIV prevention with youth. Yet limited studies have evaluated longitudinal effects of arts-based approaches to HIV prevention with youth...
October 3, 2016: BMJ Open
James Topitzes, David J Pate, Nathan D Berman, Christopher Medina-Kirchner
The present study explored factors associated with barriers to current employment among 199 low-income, primarily Black American men seeking job services. The study took place in an urban setting located within the upper Midwest region of the U.S., where the problem of Black male joblessness is both longstanding and widespread. Recent research suggests that Black male joblessness regionally and nationally is attributable to myriad macro- and micro-level forces. While structural-level factors such as migration of available jobs, incarceration patterns, and racism have been relatively well-studied, less is known about individual-level predictors of Black male joblessness, which are inextricably linked to macro-level or structural barriers...
September 29, 2016: Child Abuse & Neglect
Áine Lorié, Diego A Reinero, Margot Phillips, Linda Zhang, Helen Riess
OBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic review of studies examining how culture mediates nonverbal expressions of empathy with the aim to improve clinician cross-cultural competency. METHODS: We searched three databases for studies of nonverbal expressions of empathy and communication in cross-cultural clinical settings, yielding 16,143 articles. We examined peer-reviewed, experimental or observational articles. Sixteen studies met inclusion criteria. RESULTS: Nonverbal expressions of empathy varied across cultural groups and impacted the quality of communication and care...
September 25, 2016: Patient Education and Counseling
Alex Kulick, Laura J Wernick, Michael R Woodford, Kristen Renn
LGBTQ people experience health disparities related to multi-level processes of sexual and gender marginalization, and intersections with racism can compound these challenges for LGBTQ people of color. While community engagement may be protective for mental health broadly and for LGBTQ communities in buffering against heterosexism, little research has been conducted on the racialized dynamics of these processes among LGBTQ communities. This study analyzes cross-sectional survey data collected among a diverse sample of LGBTQ college students (n = 460), which was split by racial status...
September 28, 2016: Journal of Homosexuality
Diana J Burgess, Mary Catherine Beach, Somnath Saha
Like the population at large, health care providers hold implicit racial and ethnic biases that may contribute to health care disparities. Little progress has been made in identifying and implementing effective strategies to address these normal but potentially harmful unconscious cognitive processes. We propose that meditation training designed to increase healthcare providers' mindfulness skills is a promising and potentially sustainable way to address this problem. Emerging evidence suggests that mindfulness practice can reduce the provider contribution to healthcare disparities through several mechanisms including: reducing the likelihood that implicit biases will be activated in the mind, increasing providers' awareness of and ability to control responses to implicit biases once activated, increasing self-compassion and compassion toward patients, and reducing internal sources of cognitive load (e...
September 15, 2016: Patient Education and Counseling
Laia Bécares, Polly Atatoa-Carr
BACKGROUND: A growing number of studies document the association between maternal experiences of racial discrimination and adverse children's outcomes, but our understanding of how experiences of racial discrimination are associated with pre- and post-natal maternal mental health, is limited. In addition, existent literature rarely takes into consideration racial discrimination experienced by the partner. METHODS: We analysed data from the Growing Up in New Zealand study to examine the burden of lifetime and past year experiences of racial discrimination on prenatal and postnatal mental health among Māori, Pacific, and Asian women in New Zealand (NZ), and to study the individual and joint contribution of mother's and partner's experiences of lifetime and past year racial discrimination to women's prenatal and postnatal mental health...
2016: International Journal for Equity in Health
Nao Hagiwara, John F Dovidio, Susan Eggly, Louis A Penner
The association between physicians' and patients' racial attitudes and poorer patient-physician communication in racially discordant medical interactions is well-documented. However, it is unclear how physicians' and patients' racial attitudes independently and jointly affect their behaviors during these interactions. In a secondary analysis of video-recorded medical interactions between non-Black physicians and Black patients, we examined how physicians' explicit and implicit racial bias and patients' perceived past discrimination influenced their own as well as one another's affect and level of engagement...
July 2016: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations: GPIR
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