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Physician assisted suicide

Ezekiel J Emanuel, Bregje D Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Joachim Cohen
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 18, 2016: JAMA: the Journal of the American Medical Association
Daniel P Sulmasy, E Wesley Ely, Charles L Sprung
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 18, 2016: JAMA: the Journal of the American Medical Association
Kenneth R Stevens, William L Toffler
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 18, 2016: JAMA: the Journal of the American Medical Association
Angela Hua, Kaushal H Shah, Manish Garg, Eric Legome, Jacob Ufberg
Hanging has become the second most common form of successful suicide in the United States. Along with a high mortality rate, the long-term morbidity is consequential for both the individual patient and society. A thorough knowledge of the clinical approach will assist the emergency physician in providing optimal care and helping to minimize delayed respiratory complications. Using a case-based scenario, the initial management strategies along with rational evidence-based treatments are reviewed.
September 29, 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Jukka Varelius
The view that voluntary active euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide should be made available for terminal patients only is typically warranted by reference to the risks that the procedures are seen to involve. Though they would appear to involve similar risks, the commonly endorsed end-of-life practices referred to as passive euthanasia are available also for non-terminal patients. In this article, I assess whether there is good reason to believe that the risks in question would be bigger in the case of voluntary active euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide than in that of passive euthanasia...
November 2016: Bioethics
Thomas H McCoy, Victor M Castro, Ashlee M Roberson, Leslie A Snapper, Roy H Perlis
Importance: Suicide represents the 10th leading cause of death across age groups in the United States (12.6 cases per 100 000) and remains challenging to predict. While many individuals who die by suicide are seen by physicians before their attempt, they may not seek psychiatric care. Objective: To determine the extent to which incorporating natural language processing of narrative discharge notes improves stratification of risk for death by suicide after medical or surgical hospital discharge...
October 1, 2016: JAMA Psychiatry
Samuel N Doernberg, John R Peteet, Scott Y H Kim
BACKGROUND: Euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide (EAS) of psychiatric patients is legal in some countries but remains controversial. OBJECTIVE: This study examined a frequently raised concern about the practice: how physicians address the issue of decision-making capacity of persons requesting psychiatric EAS. METHODS: A review of psychiatric EAS case summaries published by the Dutch Regional Euthanasia Review Committees. Directed content analysis using a capacity-specific 4 abilities model (understanding of facts, applying those facts to self, weighing/reasoning, and evidencing choice) was used to code texts discussing capacity...
June 29, 2016: Psychosomatics
Michele Goodwin
This special issue of the Journal Law, Medicine & Ethics takes up the concern of informed consent, particularly in times of controversy. The dominant moral dilemmas that frame traditional bioethical concerns address medical experimentation on vulnerable subjects; physicians assisting their patients in suicide or euthanasia; scarce resource allocation and medical futility; human trials to develop drugs; organ and tissue donation; cloning; xenotransplantation; abortion; human enhancement; mandatory vaccination; and much more...
September 2016: Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics: a Journal of the American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics
Gert Helgesson, Niels Lynøe, Niklas Juth
Slippery-slope arguments typically question a course of action by estimating that it will end in misery once the first unfortunate step is taken. Previous studies indicate that estimations of the long-term consequences of certain debated actions, such as legalizing physician-assisted suicide, may be strongly influenced by tacit personal values. In this paper, we suggest that to the extent that slippery-slope arguments rest on estimations of future events, they may be mere rationalizations of personal values...
August 31, 2016: Medicine, Health Care, and Philosophy
Marianne C Snijdewind, Donald G van Tol, Bregje D Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Dick L Willems
BACKGROUND: Since the enactment of the euthanasia law in the Netherlands, there has been a lively public debate on assisted dying that may influence the way patients talk about euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide (EAS) with their physicians and the way physicians experience the practice of EAS. AIM: To show what developments physicians see in practice and how they perceive the influence of the public debate on the practice of EAS. METHODS: We conducted a secondary analysis of in-depth interviews with 28 Dutch physicians who had experience with a complex case of EAS...
August 5, 2016: Journal of Medical Ethics
Sabine Salloch
Medical professionalism forms a belief system which is used to defend physicians' ethos against counterforces which might threaten the integrity of medical practice. The current debates on professionalism, however, are characterized by the lack of a clear distinction between professional and ethical aspects of physicians' conduct. This article argues that a differentiation between professionalism and ethics is not of mere academic interest. Instead, it is of great practical importance with regard to morally contentious issues in medicine...
2016: BMC Medical Ethics
Jonathan Katz, Hiroshi Mitsumoto
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 13, 2016: Neurology
Antonio Bascuñán R
This paper reviews the sentences dictated between 1993 and 2002 by the Supreme Courts of Canada and the Unites States, the House of Lords and Supreme Court of the United Kingdom and the European Human Rights Court, about the validity of the legal prohibition of assistance for suicide. These sentences constituted a judicial consensus about the right to die. This consensus recognized the legal right of patients to reject medical treatments but did not recognize the right to be assisted by a physician to commit suicide...
April 2016: Revista Médica de Chile
Ezekiel J Emanuel, Bregje D Onwuteaka-Philipsen, John W Urwin, Joachim Cohen
IMPORTANCE: The increasing legalization of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide worldwide makes it important to understand related attitudes and practices. OBJECTIVE: To review the legal status of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide and the available data on attitudes and practices. EVIDENCE REVIEW: Polling data and published surveys of the public and physicians, official state and country databases, interview studies with physicians, and death certificate studies (the Netherlands and Belgium) were reviewed for the period 1947 to 2016...
July 5, 2016: JAMA: the Journal of the American Medical Association
John N Frank
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 10, 2016: Medical Economics
U Lewitzka, R Bauer
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 29, 2016: Der Nervenarzt
Alister Browne, J S Russell
The Criminal Code of Canada prohibits persons from aiding or abetting suicide and consenting to have death inflicted on them. Together, these provisions have prohibited physicians from assisting patients to die. On February 6, 2015, the Supreme Court of Canada declared void these provisions insofar as they "prohibit physician-assisted death for a competent adult person who (1) clearly consents to the termination of life and (2) has a grievous and irremediable medical condition (including an illness, disease or disability) that causes enduring suffering that is intolerable to the individual in the circumstances of his or her condition...
July 2016: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
Giovanni Maio
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 2016: Deutsche Medizinische Wochenschrift
Andreas Posa
Since November 2015, businesslike assisted suicide is punishable in Germany. But who acts businesslike? The majority of the German population prefers to make own decisions about the circumstances of their arriving death, and many of them would also accept (physician) assisted suicide if necessary. Only a minority of physicians plead for prohibiting assisted suicide in general. In the end everyone should be able to take position on his own. No one is obliged to use or execute assisted suicide.
June 2016: Deutsche Medizinische Wochenschrift
Tze Ling Gwendoline Beatrice Soh, Lalit Kumar Radha Krishna, Shin Wei Sim, Alethea Chung Peng Yee
Lipuma equates continuous sedation until death (CSD) to physician-assisted suicide/euthanasia (PAS/E) based on the premise that iatrogenic unconsciousness negates social function and, thus, personhood, leaving a patient effectively 'dead'. Others have extrapolated upon this position further, to suggest that any use of sedation and/or opioids at the end of life would be analogous to CSD and thus tantamount to PAS/E. These posits sit diametrically opposite to standard end-of-life care practices. This paper will refute Lipuma's position and the posits borne from it...
May 2016: Singapore Medical Journal
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