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Cognitive Error

Brian Shiner, Christine Leonard Westgate, Vanessa Simiola, Richard Thompson, Paula P Schnurr, Joan M Cook
Objective: Available studies on implementation of evidence-based psychotherapy (EBP) for patients attending Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) residential post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) programs rely on therapist self-report of EBP delivery. Patient-level data on receipt of EBP are needed both to corroborate therapist self-report and to understand patient factors that predict receipt of EBPs for PTSD. Materials and Methods: We identified 159 therapists from 38 VA residential PTSD programs who responded to a survey about EBP implementation during the 2015 fiscal year (FY15)...
March 14, 2018: Military Medicine
R Miller, K Schmidt, C Kirschbaum, S Enge
The internet-based assessment of response time (RT) and error rate (ERR) has recently become a well-validated alternative to traditional laboratory-based assessment, because methodological research has provided evidence for negligible setting- and setup-related differences in RT and ERR measures of central tendency. However, corresponding data on potential differences in the variability of such performance measures are still lacking, to date. Hence, the aim of this study was to conduct internet-based mental chronometry in both poorly standardized domestic and highly standardized laboratory environments and to compare the variabilities of the corresponding performance measures...
March 15, 2018: Behavior Research Methods
Helen O' Brien, Neil O' Leary, Siobhan Scarlett, Celia O' Hare, Rose Anne Kenny
Background: the dramatic shift in the global population demographic has led to increasing numbers of older people undergoing hospitalisation and surgical procedures. Objectives: to determine whether hospitalisation or hospitalisation with surgery under general anaesthesia is associated with poorer cognitive performance in adults over the age of 50. Methods: cognitive function in the domains of global cognition, memory and executive function was assessed in 8,023 individuals at waves 1 and 2 of The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA), 2 years apart...
March 13, 2018: Age and Ageing
Karen E Assmann, Moufidath Adjibade, Nitin Shivappa, James R Hébert, Michael D Wirth, Mathilde Touvier, Tasnime Akbaraly, Serge Hercberg, Pilar Galan, Chantal Julia, Emmanuelle Kesse-Guyot
Background: While low-grade chronic inflammation has been suggested as a major modulator of healthy aging (HA), no study has yet investigated the link between the inflammatory potential of the diet and multidimensional concepts of HA. Objective: We aimed to evaluate the association between the inflammatory potential of the diet at midlife, as measured by the Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII), and HA assessed 13 y later. Methods: We analyzed data from 2796 participants in the French Supplémentation en Vitamines et Minéraux Antioxydants (SU...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Nutrition
Ann Mansur, Megan A Hird, Alexa Desimone, Iryna Pshonyak, Tom A Schweizer, Sunit Das
The purpose of the study is to determine driving habits and behaviors of patients with brain tumors in order to better inform discussions around driving safety in this population. Eight-four patients with brain tumors participated in a survey on their driving behaviors since their diagnosis. Thirteen of these patients and thirteen sex- and age-matched healthy controls participated in cognitive testing and several driving simulation scenarios in order to objectively assess driving performance. Survey responses demonstrated that patients with brain tumors engage in a variety of driving scenarios with little subjectve difficulty...
March 15, 2018: Scientific Reports
Haley Adams, Gayathri Narasimham, John Rieser, Sarah Creem-Regehr, Jeanine Stefanucci, Bobby Bodenheimer
As virtual reality expands in popularity, an increasingly diverse audience is gaining exposure to immersive virtual environments (IVEs). A significant body of research has demonstrated how perception and action work in such environments, but most of this work has been done studying adults. Less is known about how physical and cognitive development affect perception and action in IVEs, particularly as applied to preteen and teenage children. Accordingly, in the current study we assess how preteens (children aged 8-12 years) and teenagers (children aged 15-18 years) respond to mismatches between their motor behavior and the visual information presented by an IVE...
April 2018: IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics
F Mushtaq, C O'Driscoll, Fct Smith, D Wilkins, N Kapur, R Lawton
Background Confidential reporting systems play a key role in capturing information about adverse surgical events. However, the value of these systems is limited if the reports that are generated are not subjected to systematic analysis. The aim of this study was to provide the first systematic analysis of data from a novel surgical confidential reporting system to delineate contributory factors in surgical incidents and document lessons that can be learned. Methods One-hundred and forty-five patient safety incidents submitted to the UK Confidential Reporting System for Surgery over a 10-year period were analysed using an adapted version of the empirically-grounded Yorkshire Contributory Factors Framework...
March 15, 2018: Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England
Swati M Surkar, Rashelle M Hoffman, Regina Harbourne, Max J Kurz
The primary aim of the study was to explore the prefrontal cortical (PFC) activation while performing a shape-matching motor task in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (HCP) as compared with typically developing (TD) children. Fifteen TD children ([Formula: see text]) and 12 children with HCP ([Formula: see text]) were included. We assessed the PFC activation while performing an ecologically valid upper extremity shape-matching task of different complexities by measuring the concentration of oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO) using functional near-infrared spectroscopy...
January 2018: Neurophotonics
Andrés Pomi
BACKGROUND: One of the central challenges of third millennium medicine is the abatement of medical errors. Among the most frequent and hardiest causes of misdiagnosis are cognitive errors produced by faulty medical reasoning. These errors have been analyzed from the perspectives of cognitive psychology and empirical medical studies. We introduce a neurocognitive model of medical diagnosis to address this issue. METHODS: We construct a connectionist model based on the associative nature of human memory to explore the non-analytical, pattern-recognition mode of diagnosis...
November 27, 2017: Diagnosis
Michael A Bruno
Radiologists practice in an environment of extraordinarily high uncertainty, which results partly from the high variability of the physical and technical aspects of imaging, partly from the inherent limitations in the diagnostic power of the various imaging modalities, and partly from the complex visual-perceptual and cognitive processes involved in image interpretation. This paper reviews the high level of uncertainty inherent to the process of radiological imaging and image interpretation vis-à-vis the issue of radiological interpretive error, in order to highlight the considerable degree of overlap that exists between these...
September 26, 2017: Diagnosis
George A Taylor
Perceptual errors are common contributors to missed diagnoses in the clinical practice of radiology. While the physical attributes of an image such as image resolution, signal-to-noise characteristics, and anatomic complexity are major causes of poor conspicuity of pathologic lesions, there are major interrelated cognitive contributors to visual errors. The first is satisfaction of search (SOS), where the detection of an abnormality results in premature termination of further search. Another form of incomplete search pattern is visual isolation, where a radiologist's search pattern is truncated to the main areas of an image, while little or no attention is given to peripheral areas...
September 26, 2017: Diagnosis
Goutham Rao, Paul Epner, Victoria Bauer, Anthony Solomonides, David E Newman-Toker
Diagnostic error is a serious public health problem to which knowledge gaps and associated cognitive error contribute significantly. Identifying diagnostic approaches to common problems in ambulatory care associated with more timely and accurate diagnosis and lower cost and harm associated with diagnostic evaluation is an important priority for health care systems, clinicians, and of course patients. Unfortunately, guidance on how best to approach diagnosis in patients with common presenting complaints such as abdominal pain, dizziness, and fatigue is lacking...
June 27, 2017: Diagnosis
Dolores Albarracin, Wei Wang, Kathleen C McCulloch
Four experiments uncovered an action dominance error by which people's natural focus on actions hinders appropriate responses to social and nonsocial stimuli. This surprising error comprises higher rates of both omission (misses) and commission (false alarms) when, in responding to action and inaction demands, people have higher numbers of action targets. The action dominance error was verified over four experiments using an analog that required responses to words and to target individuals. Experiments 1 and 2 tested our hypotheses and distinguished the action error effect from the effects of practicing action or inaction responses...
March 1, 2018: Personality & Social Psychology Bulletin
Amanda B Zheutlin, Adam M Chekroud, Renato Polimanti, Joel Gelernter, Fred W Sabb, Robert M Bilder, Nelson Freimer, Edythe D London, Christina M Hultman, Tyrone D Cannon
Genetic risk variants for schizophrenia have been linked to many related clinical and biological phenotypes with the hopes of delineating how individual variation across thousands of variants corresponds to the clinical and etiologic heterogeneity within schizophrenia. This has primarily been done using risk score profiling, which aggregates effects across all variants into a single predictor. While effective, this method lacks flexibility in certain domains: risk scores cannot capture nonlinear effects and do not employ any variable selection...
March 9, 2018: Schizophrenia Bulletin
Sandra Monteiro, Geoff Norman, Jonathan Sherbino
There is general consensus that clinical reasoning involves 2 stages: a rapid stage where 1 or more diagnostic hypotheses are advanced and a slower stage where these hypotheses are tested or confirmed. The rapid hypothesis generation stage is considered inaccessible for analysis or observation. Consequently, recent research on clinical reasoning has focused specifically on improving the accuracy of the slower, hypothesis confirmation stage. Three perspectives have developed in this line of research, and each proposes different error reduction strategies for clinical reasoning...
March 13, 2018: Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice
Onur Güntürkün, Charlotte Koenen, Fabrizio Iovine, Alexis Garland, Roland Pusch
We are surrounded by an endless variation of objects. The ability to categorize these objects represents a core cognitive competence of humans and possibly all vertebrates. Research on category learning in nonhuman animals started with the seminal studies of Richard Herrnstein on the category "human" in pigeons. Since then, we have learned that pigeons are able to categorize a large number of stimulus sets, ranging from Cubist paintings to English orthography. Strangely, this prolific field has largely neglected to also study the avian neurobiology of categorization...
March 12, 2018: Learning & Behavior
Pierre Antoine Brown, Swapnil Hiremath, Edward G Clark, Edmund S H Kwok, Christopher McCudden, Ayub Akbari
BACKGROUND: Morbidity and Mortality Conferences (M&MCs) have for generations been part of the education of physicians, yet their effectiveness remains questionable. The Ottawa M&M Model (OM3) was developed to provide a structured approach to M&MCs in order to maximize the quality improvement impact of such rounds. STUDY DESIGN: We conducted a retrospective assessment of the impact of implementing nephrology-specific M&MCs using the OM3. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: All physicians, residents and fellows from the division of nephrology at a large academic medical center were invited to participate...
March 12, 2018: International Urology and Nephrology
Burkhard Pleger, Dagmar Timmann
Lesion studies emphasize the role of the human cerebellum in a variety of cognitive processes. To date, most evidence comes from studies investigating language-related functions, such as verbal short-term/working memory, word generation, or linguistic/semantic predictions. This review summarizes brain imaging, non-invasive cerebellar stimulation and lesion studies in this field. Converging evidence suggests a cerebellar role in error processing and memory encoding although findings are partly contradictory...
March 9, 2018: Neuropsychologia
Susanna Konsztowicz, Norbert Schmitz, Martin Lepage
OBJECTIVE: Insight in schizophrenia is regarded as a multidimensional construct that comprises aspects such as awareness of the disorder and recognition of the need for treatment. The proposed number of underlying dimensions of insight is variable in the literature. In an effort to identify a range of existing dimensions of insight, we conducted a factor analysis on combined items from multiple measures of insight. METHOD: We recruited 165 participants with enduring schizophrenia (treated for >3years)...
March 10, 2018: Schizophrenia Research
Deokjong Lee, Jinsick Park, Kee Namkoong, In Young Kim, Young-Chul Jung
Background and aims Altered risk/reward decision-making is suggested to predispose individuals with Internet gaming disorder (IGD) to pursue short-term pleasure, despite long-term negative consequences. The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) play important roles in risk/reward decision-making. This study investigated gray matter differences in the ACC and OFC of young adults with and without IGD using surface-based morphometry (SBM). Methods We examined 45 young male adults with IGD and 35 age-matched male controls...
March 13, 2018: Journal of Behavioral Addictions
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