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Renal genetics

Marie Mitani, Munehiro Furuichi, Satoshi Narumi, Tomonobu Hasegawa, Motoko Chiga, Shinichi Uchida, Seiji Sato
Pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHA II) is a renal tubular disease that causes hyperkalemia, hypertension, and metabolic acidosis. Mutations in four genes (WNK4, WNK1, KLHL3, and CUL3) are known to cause PHA II. We report a patient with PHA II carrying a KLHL3 mutation, who also had congenital hypopituitarism. The patient, a 3-yr-old boy, experienced loss of consciousness at age 10 mo. He exhibited growth failure, hypertension, hyperkalemia, and metabolic acidosis. We diagnosed him as having PHA II because he had low plasma renin activity with normal plasma aldosterone level and a low transtubular potassium gradient...
October 2016: Clinical Pediatric Endocrinology: Case Reports and Clinical Investigations: Official Journal of the Japanese Society for Pediatric Endocrinology
Lin Yan, Yi Li, Jiang-Tao Tang, Yun-Fei An, Li-Mei Luo, Bo Dai, Yun-Ying Shi, Lan-Lan Wang
OBJECTIVE: A genome-wide association study has identified several gene polymorphisms associated with loss of renal function. The effect of these variants on renal function in kidney transplant recipients receiving immunosuppressive treatment is unknown. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cohort of 189 kidney transplant recipients and their living donors were recruited from West China Hospital of Sichuan University, on whom we assessed the association of five single nucleotide polymorphisms with renal function after kidney transplantation...
October 24, 2016: Pharmacogenetics and Genomics
Wenzao Li, Peng Zhou, Congmin Zhao, Yuping Zhang
Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), a multisystem genetic syndrome, often affects the central nervous system. The age of onset of TSC ranges from 0 to 15 years. The clinical features manifest as a combination of seizures, mental retardation, facial angiofibroma, renal angiomyolipoma, and cardiac rhabdomyoma. Most cases of TSC are caused by mutations of the TSC1 or TSC2 genes. We characterized a Chinese patient with a novel de novo mutation in the TSC2 gene associated with the TSC detected by next-generation sequencing...
October 25, 2016: Journal of Neurogenetics
Steffen Grampp, James L Platt, Victoria Lauer, Rafik Salama, Franziska Kranz, Viviana K Neumann, Sven Wach, Christine Stöhr, Arndt Hartmann, Kai-Uwe Eckardt, Peter J Ratcliffe, David R Mole, Johannes Schödel
Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is characterized by loss of function of the von Hippel-Lindau tumour suppressor (VHL) and unrestrained activation of hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs). Genetic and epigenetic determinants have an impact on HIF pathways. A recent genome-wide association study on renal cancer susceptibility identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in an intergenic region located between the oncogenes MYC and PVT1. Here using assays of chromatin conformation, allele-specific chromatin immunoprecipitation and genome editing, we show that HIF binding to this regulatory element is necessary to trans-activate MYC and PVT1 expression specifically in cells of renal tubular origins...
October 24, 2016: Nature Communications
N Kantaria, I Pantsulaia, I Andronikashvili, G Simonia
It has been known that salt-sensitivity of blood pressure is defined genetically as well as can be developed secondary to either decreased renal function or by influence of other environmental factors. The aim of the study was to evaluate the possible mechanism for the development of salt-sensitive essential hypertension in the population of Georgia. The Case-Control study included 185 subjects, 94 cases with Essential Hypertension stage I (JNC7) without prior antihypertensive treatment, and 91 controls. Salt-sensitivity test was used to divide both case and control groups into salt-sensitive (n=112) and salt-resistant (n=73) subgroups...
September 2016: Georgian Medical News
Piergiorgio Messa, Carlo Maria Alfieri, Emanuele Montanari, Mariano Ferraresso, Roberta Cerutti
Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the first genetic cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and the number of these patients who are listed for or receive a kidney transplant (KTx) is continuously increasing over time. Hence, nephrologists are involved not only in the handling of ADPKD patients during the long course of the disease, but also in programming and performing a renal transplant. The handling of all these processes implies the complete awareness of a number of critical points related to the decisions to be taken both before and after the transplant intervention...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Nephrology
Yu-Min Shen
Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare genetic disorder caused by defective complement regulation resulting in thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). Patients can present as children or adults. The syndrome consists of hemolytic anemia with schistocytosis, thrombocytopenia, significant renal damage, and/or other organ system dysfunction(s). Patients with aHUS may succumb to the complications of the disease with the very first manifestation; surviving patients often suffer from progressive organ dysfunction with significant morbidity and mortality despite plasma infusion or plasma exchange...
2016: Thrombosis Journal
Hui Han, Jinzhou Zhu, Yaqiong Wang, Zhengbin Zhu, Yanjia Chen, Lin Lu, Wei Jin, Xiaoxiang Yan, Ruiyan Zhang
Renal fibrosis is a significant threat to public health globally. Diverse primary aetiologies eventually result in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and immune cells influence this process. The roles of monocytes/macrophages, T cells and mast cells have been carefully examined, whilst only a few studies have focused on the effect of B cells. We investigated B cell function in tubulointerstitial fibrosis induced by unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO), using genetic B cell-deficient μMT mice or CD20 antibody-mediated B cell depleted mice...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Pathology
Shigeru Shibata, Kenichi Ishizawa, Shunya Uchida
The kidney has a central role in long-term control of blood pressure, and decreased kidney function is a common but difficult-to-treat cause of hypertension. Conversely, elevated blood pressure contributes to the progression of chronic kidney disease. Steroid hormone aldosterone and its receptor mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) contribute to hypertension by increasing renal salt reabsorption and promote kidney dysfunction through direct effects on renal parenchymal cells. Accumulating data indicate that various mechanisms affect aldosterone-MR signaling...
October 20, 2016: Hypertension Research: Official Journal of the Japanese Society of Hypertension
Sentaro Imamura, Shintaro Narita, Ryuta Nishikomori, Hiroshi Tsuruta, Kazuyuki Numakura, Atsushi Maeno, Mitsuru Saito, Takamitsu Inoue, Norihiko Tsuchiya, Hiroshi Nanjo, Toshio Heike, Shigeru Satoh, Tomonori Habuchi
BACKGROUND: Secondary bladder amyloidosis is an extremely rare disease, resulting from a chronic systematic inflammatory disorder associated with amyloid deposits. Although uncommon in Japan, familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a hereditary autoinflammatory disease characterized by recurrent episodes of fever of short duration and serositis and is frequently associated with systemic amyloidosis. Here, we present a case of a Japanese patient complaining of fever and macroscopic hematuria after a living donor renal transplantation...
October 19, 2016: BMC Research Notes
Petra Rust, Cem Ekmekcioglu
Excessive dietary salt (sodium chloride) intake is associated with an increased risk for hypertension, which in turn is especially a major risk factor for stroke and other cardiovascular pathologies, but also kidney diseases. Besides, high salt intake or preference for salty food is discussed to be positive associated with stomach cancer, and according to recent studies probably also obesity risk. On the other hand a reduction of dietary salt intake leads to a considerable reduction in blood pressure, especially in hypertensive patients but to a lesser extent also in normotensives as several meta-analyses of interventional studies have shown...
October 19, 2016: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Youri van Berkel, Michael Ludwig, Joanna A E van Wijk, Arend Bökenkamp
BACKGROUND: Dent disease is a rare X-linked recessive proximal tubulopathy caused by mutations in CLCN5 (Dent-1) or OCRL (Dent-2). As a rule, total protein excretion (TPE) is low in tubular proteinuria compared with glomerular disease. Several authors have reported nephrotic-range proteinuria (NP) and glomerulosclerosis in Dent disease. Therefore, we aimed to analyze protein excretion in patients with documented CLCN5 or OCRL mutations in a systematic literature review. DESIGN: PubMed and Embase were searched for cases with documented CLCN5 or OCRL mutations and (semi-)quantitative data on protein excretion...
October 18, 2016: Pediatric Nephrology: Journal of the International Pediatric Nephrology Association
H H Caline Koh-Tan, Mohammed Dashti, Ting Wang, Wendy Beattie, John Mcclure, Barbara Young, Anna F Dominiczak, Martin W Mcbride, Delyth Graham
BACKGROUND: We have previously confirmed the importance of rat chromosome 3 (RNO3) genetic loci on blood pressure elevation, pulse pressure (PP) variability and renal pathology during salt challenge in the stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive (SHRSP) rat. The aims of this study were to generate a panel of RNO3 congenic sub-strains to genetically dissect the implicated loci and identify positional candidate genes by microarray expression profiling and analysis of next-generation sequencing data...
October 17, 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Yaíma L Lightfoot, Mariana J Kaplan
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: A breakdown of immune tolerance to self-antigens in a genetically predisposing background, precipitated by environmental triggers, contributes to the development of systemic autoimmune diseases. Renewed interest in the immunomodulatory capabilities of neutrophils in systemic autoimmunity has identified neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation as a distinguishing action of neutrophils in afflicted hosts. RECENT FINDINGS: Oxidation of nucleic acids and posttranslational modifications of proteins distinctly occur during NET formation and may promote enhanced immunogenicity...
October 13, 2016: Current Opinion in Rheumatology
Keisuke Shinohara, Xuebo Liu, Donald A Morgan, Deborah R Davis, Maria Luisa S Sequeira-Lopez, Martin D Cassell, Justin L Grobe, Kamal Rahmouni, Curt D Sigmund
The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the brain is a critical determinant of blood pressure, but the mechanisms regulating RAS activity in the brain remain unclear. Expression of brain renin (renin-b) occurs from an alternative promoter-first exon. The predicted translation product is a nonsecreted enzymatically active renin whose function is unknown. We generated a unique mouse model by selectively ablating the brain-specific isoform of renin (renin-b) while preserving the expression and function of the classical isoform expressed in the kidney (renin-a)...
October 17, 2016: Hypertension
Tomofumi Fushima, Akiyo Sekimoto, Takahiro Minato, Takuya Ito, Yuji Oe, Kiyomi Kisu, Emiko Sato, Kenichi Funamoto, Yoshitaka Kimura, Sadayoshi Ito, Hiroshi Sato, Nobuyuki Takahashi
OBJECTIVE: Preeclampsia (PE) is a pregnancy-induced hypertension with proteinuria that typically develops after 20 weeks of gestation. A reduction in uterine blood flow causes placental ischemia and placental release of anti-angiogenic factors such as soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase (sFlt-1) followed by PE. Although the reduced uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) model is widely used in rats, investigating the genetics of PE has been problematic because it has been difficult to make a useful RUPP model in mice...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Paul Simon, Aelna Krajčoviechová, Francois Harvey, Mousnif Haloui, Francois-Christophe Marois-Blanchet, John Chalmers, Mark Woodward, Michel Marre, Johanne Tremblay, Pavel Hamet
OBJECTIVE: We have previously reported the genetic determinants of unmet renal needs in Type 2 Diabetic (T2D) patients of the ADVANCE study (Abstract 0105-PD, IDF - World Diabetes Congress, Vancouver, 2015). We report here the external validation of several of these loci. An improved knowledge of the genetics linked to worsening diabetic nephropathy will offer insights on how to better manage this complication of diabetes and hypertension in T2D patients. DESIGN AND METHOD: We investigated 3,500 T2D patients of Caucasian origin included in the ADVANCE trial who were all treated with current standard therapies...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Pavel Hamet, Mounsif Haloui, François Harvey, François-Christophe Marois-Blanchet, Paul Simon, John Raelson, Michael Phillips, John Chalmers, Mark Woodward, Michel Marre, Stephen Harrap, Johanne Tremblay
OBJECTIVE: We have previously reported distinct genetic architectures of renal impairment in T2D patients of Slavic and Celtic origins participating in the ADVANCE trial (J Hypertens. 2015 Jun;33 Suppl 1:e3). Further analysis suggests that the major driver of the difference in the prevalence of T2D complications between Slavic and Celtic groups is due to an earlier onset of diabetes in Slavic patients. In an attempt to distinguish between environmental and genetic factors on age of onset of diabetes, we have determined the age of onset of T2D in Slavic subjects living in Celtic countries and confirmed the same earlier onset (-2 years) in these subjects, notwithstanding their living environment...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Kenneth Jamerson
Race and ethnicity provide an important construct that identifies individuals at increased risk for hypertension and related cardiovascular complications. While a significan proportion of health care disparity can be attributed to social, cultural and ecomnomic factors, mapping of the human genome allows for a biological construct of race. A systematic review of the effect of race on the response to antihypertensive therapy was performed in 2007. In this current review, an update of this subject is provided...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Stephen Harrap
Genetic discovery in blood pressure is generally referenced in relation to protein-coding genes, despite the fact that genes less than 2% of the genome. Recent exploration of the DNA sequences between genes, once called "junk" DNA, has revealed a wealth of transcripts for RNA species that do not encode protein. These non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have emerged as dynamic managers of the business of the genome, able to coordinate the expression of genes in time and space to achieve the complexities of normal development and growth...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
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