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Trainee and feedback

Sergei Kurenov, Juan Cendan, Saleh Dindar, Kristopher Attwood, James Hassett, Ruth Nawotniak, Gregory Cherr, William G Cance, Jörg Peters
OBJECTIVE: The study assesses user acceptance and effectiveness of a surgeon-authored virtual reality (VR) training module authored by surgeons using the Toolkit for Illustration of Procedures in Surgery (TIPS). METHODS: Laparoscopic adrenalectomy was selected to test the TIPS framework on an unusual and complex procedure. No commercial simulation module exists to teach this procedure. A specialist surgeon authored the module, including force-feedback interactive simulation, and designed a quiz to test knowledge of the key procedural steps...
October 6, 2016: Surgical Innovation
E Nelson Kankaka, G Kigozi, D Kayiwa, N Kighoma, F Makumbi, T Murungi, D Nabukalu, R Nampijja, S Watya, D Namuguzi, F Nalugoda, G Nakigozi, D Sserwadda, M Wawer, R H Gray
Early infant circumcision (EIC) is the most common neonatal surgical procedure in males.(1) It has also been incorporated as a component in combination HIV prevention in 14 of Sub-Saharan African countries with high HIV prevalence and low circumcision coverage.(2,3) EIC has advantages over adult circumcision due to lower adverse events, no risk of early resumption of sex and potentially lower cost(4-6) . Sub-Saharan African countries have low physician coverage, but comparatively higher coverage of non-physicians who could facilitate roll out of circumcision for HIV prevention...
October 18, 2016: BJU International
Thomas H Hartranft, Kurt Yandle, Tim Graham, Charles Holden, Lowell W Chambers
OBJECTIVE: This study was conducted to assess the effectiveness of a newly implemented electronic web-based review system created at our institution for evaluating resident performance relative to established milestones. DESIGN: Retrospective review of data collected from a survey of general surgery faculty and residents. SETTING: Tertiary care teaching hospital system and independent academic medical center. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 12 general surgery faculty and 17 general surgery residents participated in this study...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Surgical Education
Tabor E Flickinger, Thomas O'Hagan, Margaret S Chisolm
BACKGROUND: As the use of social media (SM) tools becomes increasingly widespread, medical trainees need guidance on applying principles of professionalism to their online behavior. OBJECTIVE: To develop a curriculum to improve knowledge and skills regarding professionalism of SM use by medical students. METHODS: This project was conducted in 3 phases: (1) a needs assessment was performed via a survey of medical students regarding SM use, rationale for and frequency of use, and concerns; (2) a workshop-format curriculum was designed and piloted for preclinical students to gain foundational knowledge of online professionalism; and (3) a complementary longitudinal SM-based curriculum was designed and piloted for clinical students to promote both medical humanism and professionalism...
December 1, 2015: JMIR Med Educ
Anahita Sadeghi, Hamidreza Aghaei Meybodi, Behrouz Navabakhsh, Ahmadreza Soroush, Masoud Mohammad Malekzadeh, Zhamak Khorgami
Quality of clinical education for medical students has always been a concern in academic medicine. This concern has increased in today's time-squeeze while faculty members have to fulfill their complementary roles as a teacher, researcher, and practitioner. One of the strategies for program evaluation is obtaining trainees' feedbacks since they are the main customers of educational programs; however, there are debates about the efficacy of student feedback as a reliable source for reforms. We gathered Likert scores on a 16-item questionnaire from 2,771 medical students participating in all clerkship programs in a multidisciplinary teaching hospital...
August 2016: Acta Medica Iranica
M T Nousiainen, S A McQueen, J Hall, W Kraemer, P Ferguson, J L Marsh, R R Reznick, M R Reed, R Sonnadara
As residency training programmes around the globe move towards competency-based medical education (CBME), there is a need to review current teaching and assessment practices as they relate to education in orthopaedic trauma. Assessment is the cornerstone of CBME, as it not only helps to determine when a trainee is fit to practice independently, but it also provides feedback on performance and guides the development of competence. Although a standardised core knowledge base for trauma care has been developed by the leading national accreditation bodies and international agencies that teach and perform research in orthopaedic trauma, educators have not yet established optimal methods for assessing trainees' performance in managing orthopaedic trauma patients...
October 2016: Bone & Joint Journal
Aussama Nassar, Angela Coates, Faiz Tuma, Forough Farrokhyar, Susan Reid
OBJECTIVES: To develop a novel assessment tool for trainees-led trauma resuscitation. Assess psychometric properties of the proposed tool. Evaluate feasibility and utility of the tool. INTRODUCTION: Trauma resuscitation is a structured and complex process involving unique sets of skills. There is currently no published structured formative evaluation tool for trauma trainees. Therefore, many trauma trainees rely upon limited, unstructured feedback on their performance...
September 26, 2016: Journal of Surgical Education
J Kroft, M Ordon, L Po, N Zwingerman, J Y Lee, R Pittini
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 2015: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology
Jeanett Strandbygaard, Fedde Scheele, Jette Led Sørensen
Using validated assessment scales for technical competence can help structure and standardize assessment and feedback for both the trainee and the supervisor and thereby avoid bias and drive learning. Correct assessment of operative skills can establish learning curves and allow adequate monitoring. However, the assessment of surgical performance is not an easy task, since it includes many proxy parameters, which are hard to measure. Although numerous technical assessment scales exist, both within laparoscopic and open surgery, the validity evidence is often sparse, and this can raise doubts about reliability and educational outcome...
September 28, 2016: Medical Teacher
Austin S Lam, Sarah K Wise, Raj C Dedhia
OBJECTIVE: To assess the practice characteristics of adult sleep otolaryngologists within US otolaryngology residency training programs. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional online survey. SETTING: Otolaryngology residency training programs. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Program directors from 106 otolaryngology training programs in the United States were contacted. Program directors were instructed to forward a survey to otolaryngologists within the institution who provided Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Otolaryngology Milestone Project feedback in "sleep-disordered breathing...
September 27, 2016: Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery
Przemyslaw Korzeniowski, Daniel C Brown, Mikael H Sodergren, Alastair Barrow, Fernando Bello
The goal of this study was to establish face, content, and construct validity of NOViSE-the first force-feedback enabled virtual reality (VR) simulator for natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES). Fourteen surgeons and surgical trainees performed 3 simulated hybrid transgastric cholecystectomies using a flexible endoscope on NOViSE. Four of them were classified as "NOTES experts" who had independently performed 10 or more simulated or human NOTES procedures. Seven participants were classified as "Novices" and 3 as "Gastroenterologists" with no or minimal NOTES experience...
September 26, 2016: Surgical Innovation
John Launer
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2016: Postgraduate Medical Journal
Damian J Castanelli, Tanisha Jowsey, Yan Chen, Jennifer M Weller
INTRODUCTION: Workplace-based assessment is integral to programmatic assessment in a competency-based curriculum. In 2013, one such assessment, a mini-Clinical Evaluation Exercise (mini-CEX) with a novel "entrustability scale", became compulsory for over 1,200 Australia and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) trainees. We explored trainees' and supervisors' understanding of the mini-CEX, their experience with the assessment, and their perceptions of its influence on learning and supervision...
September 23, 2016: Canadian Journal of Anaesthesia, Journal Canadien D'anesthésie
Faye Gishen, Sophia Whitman, Deborah Gill, Rhiannon Barker, Steven Walker
BACKGROUND: Training to be a doctor and caring for patients are recognized as being stressful and demanding. The wellbeing of healthcare professionals impacts upon the wellbeing and care of patients. Schwartz Centre Rounds (SCRs), multidisciplinary meetings led by a trained facilitator and designed for hospital staff, were introduced to enhance communication and compassion, and have since been widely adopted as a way of fostering compassion. The continuum of education suggests that medical students need to develop these attributes in conjunction with resilience and maintaining empathy...
2016: BMC Medical Education
K Dimassi, A Halouani, D Chelli, B Chanoufi, A Triki, F Gara
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: Ultrasound in Obstetrics & Gynecology
Alec Buchanan, Michael Norko, Madelon Baranoski, Howard Zonana
Receiving feedback on one's work from colleagues is an essential part of clinical and forensic psychiatric practice. Often the material on which feedback is sought concerns past cases. When the material relates to current cases, particular safeguards are needed to protect important interests. This paper lists the interests that must be protected when feedback is provided through clinical consultation and supervision meetings in a forensic psychiatric training program. These are the interests of the person being evaluated, the attorneys, the people providing feedback to the evaluator, and the employers of the people providing feedback...
September 2016: Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law
Barry Jubraj, Sheena Patel, Iram Naseem, Samantha Copp, Dimitrios Karagkounis
BACKGROUND: The Acute Care Assessment Tool (ACAT) was developed as a workplace-based assessment (WPBA) for trainee performance whilst working in acute medicine. Here, we discuss the multi-professional potential of ACAT through a pilot with foundation and senior hospital pharmacists. CONTEXT: The pharmacy profession is engaging meaningfully with foundation training for pharmacists akin to doctor foundation training, and has launched a post-foundation recognition scheme as a route to advanced generalist or specialist practice...
September 14, 2016: Clinical Teacher
Aileen Barrett, Rose Galvin, Yvonne Steinert, Albert Scherpbier, Ann O'Shaughnessy, Mary Horgan, Tanya Horsley
INTRODUCTION: The extent to which workplace-based assessment (WBA) can be used as a facilitator of change among trainee doctors has not been established; this is particularly important in the case of underperforming trainees. The aim of this review is to examine the use of WBA in identifying and remediating performance among this cohort. METHODS: Following publication of a review protocol a comprehensive search of eight databases took place to identify relevant articles published prior to November 2015...
September 14, 2016: Medical Teacher
Samuel R Heaton, Zoe Little, Kash Akhtar, Manoj Ramachandran, Joshua Lee
AIM: To enhance non-technical skills and to analyse participant's experience of a course tailored for orthopaedic surgeons. METHODS: A Delphi technique was used to develop a course in human factors specific to orthopaedic residents. Twenty-six residents (six per course) participated in total with seven course facilitators all trained in Crisis Resource Management providing structured feedback. Six scenarios recreated challenging real-life situations using high-fidelity mannequins and simulated patients...
August 18, 2016: World Journal of Orthopedics
Richard A Prayson, J Jordi Rowe
OBJECTIVES: Receiving and reflecting on feedback is a critical skill in medicine. Learning how to provide effective feedback is important in assessment and engendering performance improvement. METHODS: We outline a curriculum for laboratory medicine trainees on providing effective feedback. A group of trainees (26/30 attendees) was surveyed regarding their perspectives on effective feedback and impressions of an educational session focused on how to give effective feedback...
September 10, 2016: American Journal of Clinical Pathology
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