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Pediatric otolaryngology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28224632/scoping-review-awareness-of-neurotoxicity-from-anesthesia-in-children-in-otolaryngology-literature
#1
REVIEW
Marisa A Earley, Liem T Pham, Max M April
OBJECTIVE: Review otolaryngology literature for awareness of neurotoxicity from general anesthesia in children. Recently, there has been increasing focus in anesthesia literature on the long-term effects of general anesthesia on neurodevelopment. Multiple animal models have demonstrated evidence of neurotoxicity from both inhalational and intravenous anesthetics. Cohort studies also have revealed modestly increased risk of adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes in children exposed to a single episode of general anesthesia prior to 3 to 4 years of age, with stronger evidence for multiple exposures in this age range...
February 22, 2017: Laryngoscope
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28152126/sinonasal-quality-of-life-in-children-after-outfracture-of-inferior-turbinates-and-submucous-inferior-turbinoplasty-for-chronic-nasal-congestion
#2
Brian Manzi, Kevin J Sykes, Julie L Wei
Importance: Chronic nasal congestion often persists in children despite empirical treatment using intranasal corticosteroids, systemic antihistamines, and/or leukotriene receptor antagonists. Symptoms are often reported even with negative results of skin or blood allergy testing. Inferior turbinoplasty has been effective in adults and children, but outfracture of inferior turbinates in children is rarely reported, as is use of validated quality-of-life measures to quantify improvements after intervention...
February 2, 2017: JAMA Otolaryngology—Head & Neck Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28145838/response-to-informed-consent-in-pediatric-otolaryngology-what-risks-and-benefits-do-parents-recall
#3
Paul Hong
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2017: Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28145837/in-reference-to-informed-consent-in-pediatric-otolaryngology-what-risks-and-benefits-do-parents-recall
#4
Jason E Cohn, Mark Weitzel, David Zwillenberg
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2017: Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28139319/paradoxical-vocal-fold-motion-pvfm-in-pediatric-otolaryngology
#5
Blake Smith, Claudio Milstein, Bryan Rolfes, Samantha Anne
INTRODUCTION: Paradoxical vocal fold motion (PVFM) is a condition in which the vocal cords exhibit inappropriate inspiratory adduction, and it has been poorly studied in the pediatric population. METHODS: Pediatric patients diagnosed with PVCM by a pediatric otolaryngologist and doctor of speech pathology from 2008 to 2012 were reviewed. Patients in whom another cause for their respiratory disturbance was eventually identified were excluded. Patient demographics, characteristics, treatment, and outcomes were reviewed...
January 24, 2017: American Journal of Otolaryngology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28109500/is-routine-audiometric-testing-necessary-for-children-with-isolated-preauricular-lesions
#6
Grace T Wu, Conor Devine, Allen Xu, Katie Geelan-Hansen, Samantha Anne
INTRODUCTION: Preauricular lesions, including tags, pits, sinuses, and cysts are commonly seen. Some studies have shown increased incidence of hearing loss in these patients but other studies have failed to corroborate this finding. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the incidence of hearing loss in patients with isolated preauricular lesions. METHODS: Retrospective chart review of all pediatric otolaryngology patients seen at a tertiary academic center between 2008 and 2014...
February 2017: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28109487/utility-of-polysomnography-in-determination-of-laryngomalacia-severity
#7
Jacqueline E Weinstein, Claire M Lawlor, Eric L Wu, Kimsey H Rodriguez
OBJECTIVE: To examine the efficacy of polysomnography in determining the severity of laryngomalacia in pediatric patients. METHODS: Prospective cohort study. Pediatric patients referred to our pediatric otolaryngology department with a polysomnogram already performed for a presumptive diagnosis of laryngomalacia were enrolled in the study. Patients with concurrent airway lesions or neuromuscular disorders were excluded. Patients underwent history, physical exam, and flexible fiberoptic laryngoscopy...
February 2017: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28056150/trends-in-otolaryngology-consultation-patterns-at-an-academic-quaternary-care-center
#8
Kevin J Choi, Russel R Kahmke, Matthew G Crowson, Liana Puscas, Richard L Scher, Seth M Cohen
Importance: The consultation patterns of an otolaryngology-head and neck surgery service have not previously been reported. The time, resources, and attention required to operate such a consultation service are unknown. Objective: To assess trends in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery consultations conducted in emergency departments (EDs) and inpatient services. Design, Setting, and Participants: A retrospective analysis was conducted of the medical records of patients at a quaternary care center receiving inpatient otolaryngology consultations from January 1 to December 31, 2014...
January 5, 2017: JAMA Otolaryngology—Head & Neck Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28056140/benefits-and-limitations-of-entry-level-3-dimensional-printing-of-maxillofacial-skeletal-models
#9
Alex T Legocki, Andrew Duffy-Peter, Andrew R Scott
Importance: A protocol for creating exceptionally low-cost 3-dimensional (3-D) maxillofacial skeletal models does not require proficiency with computer software or intensive labor. Small and less affluent centers can produce models with little loss in accuracy and clinical utility. Objectives: To highlight the feasibility and methods of introducing in-house, entry-level additive manufacturing (3-D printing) technology to otolaryngologic craniofacial reconstruction and to describe its clinical applications and limitations, including a comparison with available vendor models...
January 5, 2017: JAMA Otolaryngology—Head & Neck Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28012519/surgical-scheduling-categorization-system-sscs-a-novel-classification-system-to-improve-coordination-and-scheduling-of-operative-cases-in-a-tertiary-pediatric-medical-system
#10
Eric A Gantwerker, Cassandra Bannos, Michael J Cunningham, Reza Rahbar
OBJECTIVE: To describe a surgical categorization system to create a universal nomenclature, delineating patient complexity as a first step toward developing a true risk stratification system. METHODS: Retrospective database review of all otolaryngology surgical procedures performed in a tertiary pediatric hospital system over one academic year (July 2012-June 2013). All otolaryngology surgical procedures were reviewed, encompassing 8478 procedures on 5711 patients...
January 2017: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28012507/the-utility-of-a-handheld-metal-detector-in-detection-and-localization-of-pediatric-metallic-foreign-body-ingestion
#11
Javan Nation, Wen Jiang
OBJECTIVE: To test the ability of a handheld metal detector (HHMD) to identify the presence and location of ingested metallic foreign bodies (MFBs) in children. METHODS: Prospective case series enrolling children suspected of metallic foreign body ingestion presenting to the Emergency Department. Thirty-eight children were enrolled and the HHMD was used to detect the presence and location of a MFB. Results were compared to standard radiographic studies. RESULTS: Thirty-seven of the 38 ingested foreign bodies were MFBs...
January 2017: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28004263/transoral-robotic-surgery-for-the-pediatric-head-and-neck-surgeries
#12
Evren Erkul, Umamaheswar Duvvuri, Deepak Mehta, Utku Aydil
Pediatric robotic surgery is a relatively new technology that has been shown to be safe and feasible for a number of pediatric procedures. Our literature analysis was performed using Pubmed database between January 2005 and December 2015, using key words: "robotic," "robotic surgery," "TORS," "pediatric," "children," "head and neck," and "da Vinci". We selected only publications in English. Eight published reports met the selection criteria. We totally found 41 patients, and the age range was between 2 months and 19 years...
December 21, 2016: European Archives of Oto-rhino-laryngology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27930764/decision-making-quality-in-parents-considering-adenotonsillectomy-or-tympanostomy-tube-insertion-for-their-children
#13
Paul Hong, Erin Maguire, Mary Purcell, Krista C Ritchie, Jill Chorney
Importance: Shared decision making is a process in which clinicians and patients make health care decisions in a collaborative manner using the most up-to-date evidence, while considering patient values and preferences. Shared decision making is thought to have a positive influence on the decision-making process in medicine. Objective: To describe the level of decisional conflict and decisional regret experienced by parents considering surgery for their children and to determine relations among decisional conflict, decisional regret, and shared decision making...
December 8, 2016: JAMA Otolaryngology—Head & Neck Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27926758/association-between-surgeon-scorecard-use-and-operating-room-costs
#14
Corinna C Zygourakis, Victoria Valencia, Christopher Moriates, Christy K Boscardin, Sereina Catschegn, Alvin Rajkomar, Kevin J Bozic, Kent Soo Hoo, Andrew N Goldberg, Lawrence Pitts, Michael T Lawton, R Adams Dudley, Ralph Gonzales
Importance: Despite the significant contribution of surgical spending to health care costs, most surgeons are unaware of their operating room costs. Objective: To examine the association between providing surgeons with individualized cost feedback and surgical supply costs in the operating room. Design, Setting, and Participants: The OR Surgical Cost Reduction (OR SCORE) project was a single-health system, multihospital, multidepartmental prospective controlled study in an urban academic setting...
December 7, 2016: JAMA Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913067/the-financial-impact-of-clinic-no-show-rates-in-an-academic-pediatric-otolaryngology-practice
#15
Zhen Huang, Mariam Ashraf, Heather Gordish-Dressman, Pamela Mudd
PURPOSE: To investigate determinants of no-show rates in an academic pediatric otolaryngology practice including appointment time, age, sex, new patient status, payer mix, and median household income by zip code. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospective chart review of clinic no-show rates and patient demographics in a free standing children's hospital and affiliated outpatient clinics across eight providers in a one-year period. RESULTS: Analysis shows that the overall no-show rate across all providers was 15% with the highest rate of 19% in the zip code with the lowest median income...
November 23, 2016: American Journal of Otolaryngology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27901329/comparing-incidence-of-emergence-delirium-between-sevoflurane-and-desflurane-in-children-following-routine-otolaryngology-procedures
#16
Jeremy N Driscoll, Brian M Bender, Carlos A Archilla, Carol M Klim, J Hossain, George Mychaskiw, Julie L Wei
BACKGROUND: Emergence delirium (ED) is a state of aggressive agitation that can occur temporarily in the process of emerging from anesthesia in children exposed to volatile or intravenous anesthetics. Emergence delirium is typically assessed using the published and validated pediatric emergence delirium (PAED) scale. Due to some variation in properties between sevoflurane and desflurane for maintenance of anesthesia after standard sevoflurane induction, we designed a prospective study to examine potential differences in emergence behavior and incidence of ED in children undergoing elective ear-nose-throat (ENT) surgery...
November 30, 2016: Minerva Anestesiologica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27900765/the-role-of-the-otolaryngologist-in-the-evaluation-and-diagnosis-of-eosinophilic-esophagitis
#17
Mark Kubik, Prasad Thottam, Amber Shaffer, Sukgi Choi
OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical presentation and role of the otolaryngologist in the evaluation of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) at a tertiary pediatric hospital. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective review. METHODS: Records from pediatric patients with a diagnosis of EoE from 2003 to 2015 were reviewed. Study variables were analyzed to compare patients presenting to different specialties. RESULTS: Two hundred and fifty-one patients with EoE were evaluated...
November 30, 2016: Laryngoscope
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27898626/dental-trauma-in-a-pediatric-emergency-department-referral-center
#18
Emily Hall, Patricia Hickey, Thuy Nguyen-Tran, Jeff Louie
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to describe dental and associated oral injuries in a pediatric population that presents to an emergency department. METHODS: We performed a retrospective study and identified children from January 2007 to September 2011. Charts were reviewed for any subject, age from newborn to younger than 19 years, based on International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes for any dental or oral injury. Data abstraction included demographics, time of day of presentation, location and identification of tooth (s) injured, management, and disposition...
December 2016: Pediatric Emergency Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27863637/nasal-septal-abscess-in-association-with-pediatric-acute-rhinosinusitis
#19
REVIEW
Duc A Tien, Paul Krakovitz, Samantha Anne
INTRODUCTION: Nasal septal abscess (NSA) in the pediatric population is rare and can result in devastating complications. Objective of this study is to review a case series of pediatric patients presenting with NSA in association with acute rhinosinusitis (ARS) for possible risk factors and predisposing conditions. METHOD: This is a retrospective review of pediatric patients that presented to a tertiary care hospital with nasal septal abscess associated with ARS...
December 2016: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27863620/paediatric-airway-foreign-body-the-human-factors-influencing-patient-safety-in-our-hospitals
#20
O C Okonkwo, A Simons, J Nichani
Foreign bodies in the pediatric airway are an uncommon emergency with a high morbidity and mortality rate. Morbidity ranges from 10 to 20% worldwide and this pathology accounts for up to 7% of accidental deaths in children under 4. Dealing with this emergency safely and effectively is complex, requiring a tight coupling of procedures and processes and optimal anesthetic and operating conditions to prevent errors. These factors are recognized by the World Health Organization as 'Human Factors'. We perform a multi-center assessment of human factors pertinent to this emergency...
December 2016: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
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