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Douglas B Sponsler, Reed M Johnson
The role of pesticides in recent honey bee losses is controversial, partly because field studies often fail to detect effects predicted by laboratory studies. This dissonance highlights a critical gap in the field of honey bee toxicology: there exists little mechanistic understanding of the patterns and processes of exposure that link honey bees to pesticides in their environment. We submit that 2 key processes underlie honey bee pesticide exposure: (1) the acquisition of pesticide by foraging bees and (2) the in-hive distribution of pesticide returned by foragers...
October 21, 2016: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
Martin Duignan, Mary McGibney
BACKGROUND: Patellar dislocations are common, particularly in the adolescent polulation. Registered Advanced Nurse Practitioners are healthcare professionals who can appropriately manage these injuries to minimise the risk of chronicity. METHODS: This is a case study which uses a clinical examplar from the authors practice focusing on the assessment, diagnosis and managment of patellar dislocations. Particular reference is made of the significance of the MPFL. RESULTS: This paper highlights the importance of recognition of appropriate management of patellar dislocations in the ED setting...
October 17, 2016: International Emergency Nursing
Zachary Y Huang, Stephanie Lin, Kiheung Ahn
Methoprene, a juvenile hormone (JH) analog, is a widely used insecticide that also accelerates behavioral development in honey bees (Apis mellifera). JH regulates the transition from nursing to foraging in adult worker bees, and treatment with JH or methoprene have both been shown to induce precocious foraging. To determine how methoprene changes honey bee behavior, we compared JH titers of methoprene-treated and untreated bees. Behavioral observations confirmed that methoprene treatment significantly increased the number of precocious foragers in 3 out of 4 colonies...
October 20, 2016: Insect Science
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 19, 2016: Nature
Guangda Peng, Makiko Kashio, Tianbang Li, Xiaofeng Dong, Makoto Tominaga, Tatsuhiko Kadowaki
The transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily A, member 1 (TRPA1) is conserved between many arthropods, and in some has been shown to function as a chemosensor for noxious compounds. Activation of arthropod TRPA1 channels by temperature fluctuations has been tested in only a few insect species, and all of them were shown to be activated by heat. The recent identification of chemosensitive TRPA1 channels from two honey bee ectoparasitic mite species (VdTRPA1 and TmTRPA1) have provided an opportunity to study the temperature-dependent activation and the temperature-associated physiological functions of TRPA1 channels in non-insect arthropods...
2016: Frontiers in Physiology
Rebecca A Schmidt-Jeffris, Brian A Nault
Many vegetable insect pests are managed using neonicotinoid and pyrethroid insecticides. Unfortunately, these insecticides are toxic to many bees and natural enemies and no longer control some pests that have developed resistance. Anthranilic diamide insecticides provide systemic control of many herbivorous arthropod pests, but exhibit low toxicity to beneficial arthropods and mammals, and may be a promising alternative to neonicotinoids and pyrethroids. Anthranilic diamides may be delivered to vegetable crops via seed, in-furrow, or foliar treatments; therefore, it would be desirable to identify which application method provides high levels of pest control while minimizing the amount of active ingredient...
October 19, 2016: Journal of Economic Entomology
Gillian Hertlein, Marlene Seiffert, Sebastian Gensel, Eva Garcia-Gonzalez, Julia Ebeling, Ranko Skobalj, Anja Kuthning, Roderich D Süssmuth, Elke Genersch
The Gram-positive bacterium Paenibacillus larvae (P. larvae) is the causative agent of a deadly honey bee brood disease called American Foulbrood (AFB). AFB is a notifiable epizootic in most countries and, hence, P. larvae is of considerable relevance for veterinarians and apiculturists alike. Over the last decade, much progress has been made in the understanding of the (patho)biology of P. larvae. Recently, several non-ribosomally produced peptides (NRP) and peptide/polyketide (NRP/PK) hybrids produced by P...
2016: PloS One
Andressa S Pinto, Marcio F Chedid, Léa T Guerra, Mario R Álvares-DA-Silva, Alexandre de Araújo, Luciano S Guimarães, Ian Leipnitz, Aljamir D Chedid, Cleber R P Kruel, Tomaz J M Grezzana-Filho, Cleber D P Kruel
Background: Reliable measurement of basal energy expenditure (BEE) in liver transplant (LT) recipients is necessary for adapting energy requirements, improving nutritional status and preventing weight gain. Indirect calorimetry (IC) is the gold standard for measuring BEE. However, BEE may be estimated through alternative methods, including electrical bioimpedance (BI), Harris-Benedict Equation (HBE), and Mifflin-St. Jeor Equation (MSJ) that carry easier applicability and lower cost. Aim: To determine which of the three alternative methods for BEE estimation (HBE, BI and MSJ) would provide most reliable BEE estimation in LT recipients...
July 2016: Arquivos Brasileiros de Cirurgia Digestiva: ABCD, Brazilian Archives of Digestive Surgery
Soledad Sagastume, Raquel Martín-Hernández, Mariano Higes, Nuno Henriques-Gil
BACKGROUND: There is great controversy as to whether Microsporidia undergo a sexual cycle. In the paradigmatic case of Nosema ceranae, although there is no morphological evidence of sex, some meiosis-specific genes are present in its reduced genome and there is also high intraspecific variability, with incongruent phylogenies having been systematically obtained. The possibility of sexual recombination is important from an epidemiological standpoint, particularly as N. ceranae is considered to be a major factor in the current disquieting epidemic of widespread bee colony losses...
October 18, 2016: BMC Evolutionary Biology
Nadja Danner, Anna Maria Molitor, Susanne Schiele, Stephan Härtel, Ingolf Steffan-Dewenter
Honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) show a large variation in foraging distances and use a broad range of plant species as pollen resources, even in regions with intensive agriculture. However, it is unknown how increasing areas of mass-flowering crops like oilseed rape (Brassica napus; OSR) or a decrease of seminatural habitats (SNH) change the temporal and spatial availability of pollen resources for honey bee colonies, and thus foraging distances and frequency in different habitat types. We studied pollen foraging of honey bee colonies in 16 agricultural landscapes with independent gradients of OSR and SNH area within 2 km and used waggle dances and digital geographic maps with major land cover types to reveal the distance and visited habitat type on a landscape level...
September 2016: Ecological Applications: a Publication of the Ecological Society of America
Hasan Al Toufailia, Denise A Alves, José M S Bento, Luis C Marchini, Francis L W Ratnieks
Social insects have many defence mechanisms against pests and pathogens. One of these is hygienic behaviour, which has been studied in detail in the honey bee, Apis mellifera Hygienic honey bee workers remove dead and diseased larvae and pupae from sealed brood cells, thereby reducing disease transfer within the colony. Stingless bees, Meliponini, also rear brood in sealed cells. We investigated hygienic behaviour in three species of Brazilian stingless bees (Melipona scutellaris, Scaptotrigona depilis, Tetragonisca angustula) in response to freeze-killed brood...
October 17, 2016: Biology Open
Sanad Alonezi, Jonans Tusiimire, Jennifer Wallace, Mark J Dufton, John A Parkinson, Louise C Young, Carol J Clements, Jin Kyu Park, Jong Woon Jeon, Valerie A Ferro, David G Watson
In the present study, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) was employed to characterise the metabolic profiles of two human ovarian cancer cell lines A2780 (cisplatin-sensitive) and A2780CR (cisplatin-resistant) in response to their exposure to melittin, a cytotoxic peptide from bee venom. In addition, the metabolomics data were supported by application of Biolog microarray technology to examine the utilisation of carbon sources by the two cell lines. Data extraction with MZmine 2.14 and database searching were applied to provide metabolite lists...
October 13, 2016: Metabolites
Yukio Yamori, Mari Mori, Miki Sagara, Fnshi Xu, Young Hyo Lim, Bo Youl Choi, Bee Keun Kim, Yong Gu Lee, Mi Kyung Kim, Jinho Shin
OBJECTIVE: Detection of individual difference in salt-induced blood pressure (BP) elevation is important to know who should reduce salt intake for preventing hypertension, but the diagnosis of salt sensitivity requires a time-consuming protocol for testing BP changes in response to salt loading and depletion. Since WHO-CARDIAC Study indicated BP was higher in the people excreting more 24-hour urinary (24U) salt with higher heart rate (HR), ambulatory BP was monitored in a Korean population to investigate the association of nighttime BP and HR with 24-hour urinary salt excretion for detecting salt sensitivity...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Mari Mori, Miki Sagara, Fnshi Xu, Young Hyo Lim, Bo Youl Choi, Bee Keun Kim, Yong Gu Lee, Mi Kyung Kim, Yukio Yamori, Jinho Shin
OBJECTIVE: Objective: It is now established that "dippers" whose blood pressure (BP) falls at night have lower cardiovascular risks than nondippers without nocturnal BP fall. Our previous study on the middle-aged general population in Korea indicated increased 24-hour urinary (24U) sodium excretion was associated with increased nighttime BPs. Therefore, we further analyzed the association of salt intakes estimated by 24U analysis with dipping in nocturnal BP and heart rate. DESIGN AND METHOD: Design and method: In the rural area in South Korea 218 subjects aged 30 to 59 years were measured with casual and ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) (TM2430, A&D, Tokyo, Japan) and their 24U samples collected by aliquot cups were analyzed...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Sridhar Ravi, Dmitry Kolomenskiy, Thomas Engels, Kai Schneider, Chun Wang, Jörn Sesterhenn, Hao Liu
The natural wind environment that volant insects encounter is unsteady and highly complex, posing significant flight-control and stability challenges. It is critical to understand the strategies insects employ to safely navigate in natural environments. We combined experiments on free flying bumblebees with high-fidelity numerical simulations and lower-order modeling to identify the mechanics that mediate insect flight in unsteady winds. We trained bumblebees to fly upwind towards an artificial flower in a wind tunnel under steady wind and in a von Kármán street formed in the wake of a cylinder...
October 18, 2016: Scientific Reports
Ronelle E Welton, David J Williams, Danny Liew
BACKGROUND: This study provides the first contemporary epidemiological insight into venomous injuries based on demographics and geography in Australia in the timeframe 2000-2013. METHODS: Analysis of national hospitalisation and mortality data to examine the incidence of injury and death due to envenoming in Australia. Rates were calculated using the intercensal population for all Australian age groups. RESULTS: Over the study period, deaths were due to an anaphylactic event (0...
October 17, 2016: Internal Medicine Journal
Neloy Kumar Chakroborty, Randolf Menzel, Marco Schubert
Ca(2+) imaging techniques were applied to investigate the neuronal behavior of projection neurons in the honeybee antennal lobe to examine the effects of long lasting adaptation on odorant coding. Responses to 8 test odorants were measured before, during and after an odor adaptation phase. Bees were exposed to the adapting odor for 30 minutes. Test odorant responses were only recorded from a sub-population of accessible glomeruli on the antennal lobe surface. Projection neurons, the output neurons of the antennal lobes, are projecting through the lateral, mediolateral and medial antennal lobe tract to higher centers of the olfactory pathway...
October 17, 2016: European Journal of Neuroscience
Mohammad Reza Karimlu, Aida Alavi-Moghaddam, Omid Rafizadeh, Arsalan Azizpour, Isa Khaheshi
Herein we report a case of extensive anterior myocardial infarction (MI) after bee sting, in 57-year-old man who had no known risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD).
October 2016: Cardiovascular Diagnosis and Therapy
Vincent Doublet, Robert J Paxton, Cynthia M McDonnell, Emeric Dubois, Sabine Nidelet, Robin F A Moritz, Cédric Alaux, Yves Le Conte
Regulation of gene expression in the brain plays an important role in behavioral plasticity and decision making in response to external stimuli. However, both can be severely affected by environmental factors, such as parasites and pathogens. In honey bees, the emergence and re-emergence of pathogens and potential for pathogen co-infection and interaction have been suggested as major components that significantly impaired social behavior and survival. To understand how the honey bee is affected and responds to interacting pathogens, we co-infected workers with two prevalent pathogens of different nature, the positive single strand RNA virus Black queen cell virus (BQCV), and the Microsporidia Nosema ceranae, and explored gene expression changes in brains upon single infections and co-infections...
December 2016: Genomics Data
Chung Eui You, Seok Hoon Moon, Kwang Hoon Lee, Kyu Han Kim, Chun Wook Park, Seong Joon Seo, Sang Hyun Cho
BACKGROUND: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common, complex disease that follows a chronic relapsing course and significantly affects the quality of life of patients. Skin barrier dysfunction and inflammatory processes induce and aggravate this skin condition. Proper use of an emollient for hydration is a keystone of AD treatment. Bee venom is known to have anti-inflammatory effects and has been widely used in traditional medicine to treat various inflammatory disorders. OBJECTIVE: To find out the beneficial effect of an emollient containing bee venom in the treatment of patients with AD...
October 2016: Annals of Dermatology
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