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Blood pressure CKD

Helen L MacLaughlin, Iain C Macdougall, Wendy L Hall, Tracy Dew, Konstantinos Mantzoukis, Jude A Oben
BACKGROUND: The outcomes of intragastric balloon (IGB) placement to achieve weight loss in obese patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have not been reported to date. This study aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of the IGB as a weight-loss treatment among this patient population. METHODS: A prospective, single-arm, 'first in CKD' interventional study was conducted in patients with a body mass index >35 kg/m2 and CKD stages 3-4, referred for weight loss...
October 27, 2016: American Journal of Nephrology
Ibrahim M Salman, Cara M Hildreth, Jacqueline K Phillips
We investigated age- and sex-related changes in reflex renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and haemodynamic responses to vagal afferent stimulation in a rodent model of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Using anaesthetised juvenile (7-8weeks) and adult (12-13weeks) Lewis Polycystic Kidney (LPK) and Lewis control rats of either sex (n=63 total), reflex changes in RSNA, heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) to vagal afferent stimulation (5-s train, 4.0V, 2.0-ms pulses, 1-16Hz) were measured. In all groups, stimulation of the vagal afferents below 16Hz produced frequency-dependent reductions in RSNA, HR and MAP, while a 16Hz stimulus produced an initial sympathoinhibition followed by sympathoexcitation...
October 11, 2016: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic & Clinical
Salvatore De Cosmo, Francesca Viazzi, Antonio Pacilli, Carlo Giorda, Antonio Ceriello, Sandro Gentile, Giuseppina Russo, Maria C Rossi, Antonio Nicolucci, Pietro Guida, Roberto Pontremoli
: The identification of clinical predictors for the development of chronic kidney disease is a critical issue in the management of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.We evaluated 27,029 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m and normoalbuminuria from the database of the Italian Association of Clinical Diabetologists network. Primary outcomes were eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m and normoalbuminuria; albuminuria and eGFR ≥60 mL/min/1...
July 2016: Medicine (Baltimore)
Sarah Ma Caney
OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to learn about owner experiences of chronic kidney disease (CKD), focusing on use of therapeutic renal diets (TRDs) and intestinal phosphate binders (IPBs). METHODS: An online survey was promoted to UK-based cat owners. RESULTS: In total, 859 owners participated. Most cats (n = 620; 72.18%) had two or more clinical signs at the time of their CKD diagnosis. Most common were polydipsia (n = 462; 53...
October 17, 2016: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
Jongha Park
Cardiovascular (CV) risk assessment is not easy in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Age, male sex, race, family history of CV disease, smoking status and diabetes should be considered as CV risk factors as the general population. It is also accepted that hypertension (HTN) is associated with the greater risk of CV complications in this population. However, there are some concerns in this issue.First, supporting evidence for specific blood pressure (BP) targets in CKD is scarce. Many observational studies reported a J-shaped association between BP level and CV mortality unlike a linear association in the general population...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Hooi Min Lim, Yook Chin Chia, Siew Mooi Ching
OBJECTIVE: We aim to examine the relationship between visit-to-visit systolic blood pressure variability (BPV) and decline in renal function in patients with hypertension and determine the level of systolic BPV that contribute to significant renal function decline. DESIGN AND METHOD: This is a 15-year (1998-2012) retrospective cohort study of 825 hypertensive patients with normal renal function at baseline in a primary care clinic. Three monthly blood pressure readings per year were retrieved from the 15 years of clinic visits...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Sheila Patel, Elena Velkoska, Louise Burrell
OBJECTIVE: Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is prevalent in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and a major cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Treatment of LVH in CKD is based on blood pressure control. The Kruppel like factor 15 (KLF15) is expressed in the heart and acts as a repressor of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. The role of cardiac KLF15 in the development of LVH in rats with CKD secondary to subtotal nephrectomy (STNx) or the effects of ACE inhibition on KLF15 levels has not been addressed previously...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Jong-Chan Youn, Hee Tae Yu, Hyeon Chang Kim, Suk-Won Choi, Seong-Woo Han, Kyu-Hyung Ryu, Eui-Cheol Shin, Sungha Park
OBJECTIVE: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with increased arterial stiffness, which is a well-known predictor of future cardiovascular events. However, the underlying mechanism of arterial stiffening in CKD is not well known. Accelerated immune aging, characterized by expansion of immunosenescent T cell fraction might be involved in the pathogenesis of arterial stiffening in CKD. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between arterial stiffness and immunosenescent T cell (CD8CD57 or CD8CD28 T cell) fraction in patients with CKD...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Donghoon Choi
: Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis is an increasingly recognized medical problem especially in elderly patients. It commonly occurs with systemic manifestations including hypertension (HTN), chronic kidney disease (CKD) or atherosclerotic diseases including coronary or peripheral artery disease. Significant renal artery stenosis may result in HTN, ischemic nephropathy, however it is still in debate about the benefit of revascularization. Although several randomized controlled trials including Angioplasty and Stenting for Renal Artery Lesions (ASTRAL) and Cardiovascular Outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions (CORAL) study has failed to reveal a significant benefit of angioplasty, angioplasty with medical therapy is increasingly accepted in some patients with certain clinical conditions...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Daniel W Jones
Hypertension and Chronic Kidney Disease are both common. The vast majority of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have hypertension. Hypertension can be both a cause and a result of CKD. Many patients with CKD, both diabetic and non-diabetic have overt proteinuria (>300 mg/day). Patients with proteinuria are at higher risk for progression of kidney disease and for atherosclerosis. Because patients with CKD are often excluded from hypertension trials with hard outcomes, there has been until recently less data than ideal to consider in making decisions...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Paul Whelton
BACKGROUND: Choice of the optimal target for blood pressure (BP) reduction during treatment of patients with hypertension, including those with underlying co-morbid conditions, is an important challenge in clinical practice. The Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) was designed to provide guidance in selection of a Systolic BP target during treatment of hypertension. METHODS: Adults ≥50 years old with hypertension and at least one additional risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), but excluding persons with diabetes mellitus, prior stroke, or advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) were randomly assigned to intensive therapy (intensive), targeting a systolic BP (SBP) <120 mmHg, or standard therapy (standard), targeting a SBP <140 mmHg...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Shokei Kim-Mitsuyama
There is accumulating evidence that RAS inhibitors not only reduce blood pressure, but also exert pleiotropic effects, including a renoprotective effect, amelioration of insulin resistance, reduction in onset of diabetes, and suppression of cardiovascular remodelling,. However, the definite benefit of RAS inhibition in treatment of hypertension with CKD or DM is not conclusive. We previously performed the OlmeSartan and Calcium Antagonists Randomized (OSCAR) study comparing the preventive effect of high-dose ARB therapy versus ARB plus CCB combination therapy on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in 1164 Japanese elderly hypertensive patients with baseline type 2 diabetes and/or CVD (Am J Med (2012))...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Kate Denton, Karen Moritz, Lindsey Booth, Clive May, Geoff Head, Markus Schlaich, Reetu Singh
OBJECTIVE: Renal sympathetic nerves contribute significantly to the control of kidney function and blood pressure. A critical question is whether catheter-based renal denervation (cDNX) has adverse consequences, in situations of clinical challenge, such as hemorrhage. The aim was to examine the effects of cDNX on basal mean arterial pressure (MAP) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and in response to hemorrhage in hypertensive sheep with chronic kidney disease (CKD). DESIGN AND METHOD: Hypertension and CKD was induced in sheep by performing fetal unilateral nephrectomy (CKD; N = 14)...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Ran-Hui Cha, Hajeong Lee, Jung Pyo Lee, Chun Soo Lim, Yon Su Kim, Sung Gyun Kim
OBJECTIVE: Blood pressure (BP) control is the most established practice for preventing the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). We examined the BP control and nocturnal dipping pattern change in hypertensive patients with CKD and its effects on target organ damages. DESIGN AND METHOD: We recruited 378 hypertensive CKD patients from 4 centers in Korea. They underwent office and ambulatory BP monitoring at the time of enrollment and 1 year after. High office and ambulatory BP was defined as > 140/90 mmHg and > 135/85 mmHg (daytime)/> 120/70 mmHg (nighttime), respectively...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Matthew Weir, Martha Mayo, Dahlia Garza, Susan Arthur, Lance Berman, David Bushinsky, Daniel Wilson, Murray Epstein
OBJECTIVE: Diuretics, alone or in combination, are frequently prescribed in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and heart failure (HF) patients to reduce volume, blood pressure, and/or for symptom control. Clinicians may also use them to reduce the risk of hyperkalemia, but high doses of diuretics may lead to adverse events from intravascular volume depletion or gout. Patiromer is a non-absorbed K-binding polymer recently approved by the FDA for the treatment of hyperkalemia (HK). We compared patiromer's effects in RAASi-treated CKD patients with HK on different types of diuretics to patients not receiving diuretics in the treatment phase of OPAL-HK...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Matthew Weir, George L Bakris, Coleman Gross, Martha R Mayo, Dahlia Garza, Jinwei Yuan, Lance Berman, Gordon H Williams
OBJECTIVE: Elevated serum aldosterone can be vasculotoxic and facilitates cardiorenal damage. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone inhibitors (RAASi) reduce serum aldosterone levels and/or block its effects but can cause hyperkalemia (HK). Patiromer, a nonabsorbed potassium binder, decreases serum potassium (K) in CKD patients on RAASi. We examined the effect of patiromer on serum aldosterone levels, plasma renin activity (PRA), systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) in CKD patients on RAASi with HK (serum K 5...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Dagmara Hering, Petra Marusic, Jacqueline Duval, Yusuke Sata, Murray Esler, Antony Walton, Markus Schlaich
OBJECTIVE: Previous studies have shown that renal denervation has the potential to reduce blood pressure (BP) and slow the decline of renal function in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients up to 12 months post procedure. The effects of RDN on estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and BP reduction beyond the first year remain unknown. This study investigated the effects of RDN on renal function and BP in CKD patients (eGFR ≤ 60 ml/min/1.73 m) out to 24 months post procedure. DESIGN AND METHOD: eGFR from the previous 60 months were retrospectively collected from 46 CKD patients who were scheduled for RDN...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Jiadela Teliewubai, Yu-Yan Lv, Shi-Kai Yu, Bin Bai, Chen Chi, Kai Wang, Yi-Wu Zhou, Jing Xiong, Yi Zhang, Ya-Wei Xu
OBJECTIVE: The Eighth Joint National Committee Panel recommended novel blood pressure (BP) goals for individuals with hypertension, which is still under debate. We therefore assessed patients' target organ damages in controlled hypertensives defined by the Seventh or Eighth Joint National Committee thresholds (JNC7 and JNC8) in a community-based elderly Chinese population, in order to find the optimal BP goal for the elderly Chinese. DESIGN AND METHOD: 1599 community-based elderly participants (age > 65 years old) were recruited in the northern Shanghai...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
David John Webb
Treatment-resistant hypertension (TRH) is defined as the failure to achieve an office BP target of <140/90 mmHg (<130/80 mmHg in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) or diabetes) in patients with hypertension (HT), despite adherence to at least 3 antihypertensive medications at optimal tolerated doses, ideally including a diuretic (Calhoun et al., Circulation 2008). TRH identifies patients with hard-to-treat HT, who might benefit from specialist investigation and treatment. Although some studies put the prevalence of TRH as >10%, these levels may be inflated by white-coat hypertension and poor adherence...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Alberto Zanchetti
The question of BP targets of antihypertensive treatment has been debated in recent guidelines, and reopened by publication of SPRINT. Although interpretation of SPRINT is made difficult by a preferential effect of more intense BP lowering on heart failure rather than stroke and myocardial infarction, and by a different method of BP measurement, recent meta-analyses by my group have shown SBP reduction <130 mmHg can reduce risk of cardiovascular (CV) outcomes further, but absolute benefit is smaller than that achieved across the 140 mmHg cutoff, and treatment discontinuations for adverse events become greater...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
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