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Medical law

Sarah E Baum, Kari White, Kristine Hopkins, Joseph E Potter, Daniel Grossman
BACKGROUND: In November 2013, Texas implemented three abortion restrictions included in House Bill 2 (HB 2). Within six months, the number of facilities providing abortion decreased by almost half, and the remaining facilities were concentrated in large urban centers. The number of medication abortions decreased by 70% compared to the same period one year prior due to restrictions on this method imposed by HB 2. The purpose of this study was to explore qualitatively the experiences of women who were most affected by the law: those who had to travel farther to reach a facility and those desiring medication abortion...
2016: PloS One
Thomas Nicholson, Catherine Admay, Aaron Shakow, Salmaan Keshavjee
The human rights arguments that underpinned the fight against HIV over the last three decades were poised, but ultimately failed, to provide a similar foundation for success against multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) and other diseases of the poor. With more than 1.5 million deaths since 2000 attributed to strains of MDR-TB, and with half a million new, and mostly untreated, MDR-TB cases in the world each year, the stakes could not be higher. The World Health Organization (WHO), whose mandate is to champion the attainment by all peoples of the highest possible level of health, recommended unsound medical treatment for MDR-TB patients in resource-poor settings from 1993-2002...
June 2016: Health and Human Rights
Samuel R Bagenstos
This article will discuss the legal obligations of medical schools to accommodate applicants and students with disabilities. The article begins by describing the problem of denial of medical education to such students, a problem that results from both discrimination in admissions and denial of accommodations to incumbent students with disabilities. The article then discusses the disability rights legislation that prohibits discrimination against-and requires reasonable accommodation of-qualified medical students with disabilities...
October 1, 2016: AMA Journal of Ethics
Frederick Romberg, Bennett A Shaywitz, Sally E Shaywitz
We examine the dilemmas faced by a medical student with dyslexia who wonders whether he should "out" himself to faculty to receive the accommodations entitled by federal law. We first discuss scientific evidence on dyslexia's prevalence, unexpected nature, and neurobiology. We then examine the experiences of medical students who have revealed their dyslexia to illustrate the point that, far too often, attending physicians who know little about dyslexia can misperceive the motives or behavior of students with dyslexia...
October 1, 2016: AMA Journal of Ethics
R Aubry
On February 2, 2016, the French parliament adopted legislation creating new rights for the terminally ill. The text modifies and reinforces the rights of patients to end-of-life care and strengthens the status of surrogate decision makers. Under the new regulations, advance directives become legally binding though not unenforceable. Two types of advance directives are distinguished depending on whether the person is suffering or not from a serious illness when drafting them. The attending physician must abide by the patient's advance directives except in three situations: there is a life-threatening emergency; the directives are manifestly inappropriate; the directives are not compatible with the patient's medical condition...
October 21, 2016: Revue Neurologique
Murat Akbaba, Vedat Davutoğlu
The relationship between patients and physicians has maintained its importance throughout human history because of special features of the medical profession. This relationship engendered true loyalty of patients to their physicians as well as serious legal conflicts. Medical malpractice has gained importance among physicians and ignited discussion because of new articles added to the Turkish Penal Code in 2005. In a very short time, the penalties mandated had a chilling, negative effect on doctors, resulting in loss of affection for the profession, hesitation to intervene, and burnout syndrome...
October 2016: Türk Kardiyoloji Derneği Arşivi: Türk Kardiyoloji Derneğinin Yayın Organıdır
Joan H Krause
Fueled by massive settlements and concerns about pharmaceutical company influence over medical practice, the fight over off-label promotion has become a rancorous one with little middle ground. For some, off-label restrictions are both bad law and bad medicine, violating the First Amendment while denying physicians access to crucial information. For others, the battle pits the very soul of the FDA against the excesses of a profit-driven marketplace. Far from ameliorating concerns over manufacturer influence, the New Model proposed by Bennett et al...
November 2015: Journal of Law and the Biosciences
Anna Wexler
Several recent articles have called for the regulation of consumer transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) devices, which provide low levels of electrical current to the brain. However, most of the discussion to-date has focused on ethical or normative considerations; there has been a notable absence of scholarship regarding the actual legal framework in the United States. This article aims to fill that gap by providing a pragmatic analysis of the consumer tDCS market and relevant laws and regulations...
November 2015: Journal of Law and the Biosciences
Cara Angelotta, Carol J Weiss, John W Angelotta, Richard A Friedman
OBJECTIVE: The relationship between use of medication-assisted treatment (MAT) in pregnant women with opioid use disorders, the standard of care, and state laws that permit child abuse charges for illicit drug use during pregnancy has not been described. METHODS: Using publicly available data on substance abuse treatment in the United States, we describe patterns in the use of MAT for pregnant women with opioid use disorders in states with prenatal child abuse laws compared with states without such laws...
October 20, 2016: Women's Health Issues: Official Publication of the Jacobs Institute of Women's Health
Alaaddin M Salih, Jasim M Ahmed, Jamal F Mohamed, Musaab M Alfaki
Given the persistent recurrence of armed conflict, influential actors owe it to the affected communities to take action. The legitimacy of health professionals to mitigate the effects of conflict relates to their ability to save lives and address the physical and mental consequences of armed conflict during which thousands of lives may be lost. Medical professionals have unique and potentially far-reaching skills. These become crucial during wartime and disasters in terms of providing medical services and humanitarian aid...
October 24, 2016: Medicine, Conflict, and Survival
Zohar Barnett-Itzhaki, Tamar Berman, Itamar Grotto, Eyal Schwartzberg
BACKGROUND: Large amounts of expired and unused medications accumulate in households. This potentially exposes the public to hazards due to uncontrolled use of medications. Most of the expired or unused medications that accumulate in households (household medical waste) is thrown to the garbage or flushed down to the sewage, potentially contaminating waste-water, water resources and even drinking water. There is evidence that pharmaceutical active ingredients reach the environment, including food, however the risk to public health from low level exposure to pharmaceuticals in the environment is currently unknown...
2016: Israel Journal of Health Policy Research
Hasan A Zaidi, David J Cote, Ian F Dunn, Edward R Laws
Despite formal pathological criteria, not all atypical pituitary adenomas display clinically aggressive behavior. We set out to determine which factors predict a clinically aggressive phenotype among a cohort of atypical pituitary adenomas. Medical records were retrospectively reviewed from April 2008 to July 2015. Of 569 pituitary adenomas, 47 (8.3%) patients were surgically treated for atypical adenomas as defined by the WHO criteria. Clinically aggressive adenomas were defined as occurring in those patients who necessitated additional therapeutic intervention after the index (first) surgery, including additional surgery, medical therapy, or radiosurgery...
October 17, 2016: Journal of Clinical Neuroscience: Official Journal of the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia
Ruaim A Muaygil
Advances in reproductive medicine have provided new, and much needed, hope for millions of people struggling with infertility. Gestational surrogacy is one such development that has been gaining popularity with infertile couples, especially those unable to benefit from other reproductive procedures such as In Vitro Fertilization. For many Muslim couples, however, surrogacy remains a nonviable option. Islamic scholars have deemed the procedure incompatible with Islam and have prohibited its use. This paper examines the arguments presented for proscribing surrogacy arrangements in Sunni Islam in particular...
October 20, 2016: Developing World Bioethics
Nathan Hodson, Alice Ryrie, Rose Glennerster
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 2016: Medical Education
Kelton Tremellen, Sam Everingham
BACKGROUND: Australian law allows for altruistic surrogacy but prohibits compensation of surrogates beyond their expenses, or the use of professional surrogacy agencies. These restrictions limit local access to surrogacy, driving Australians overseas where they can access commercial surrogacy. AIM: To assess the Australian public's views regarding the use of gestational surrogacy under various social and medical scenarios, together with their level of support for financial compensation of surrogates and the use of professional surrogacy agencies...
October 19, 2016: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology
Silvia S Martins, Christine M Mauro, Julian Santaella-Tenorio, June H Kim, Magdalena Cerda, Katherine M Keyes, Deborah S Hasin, Sandro Galea, Melanie Wall
BACKGROUND: Little is known on how perceived availability of marijuana is associated with medical marijuana laws. We examined the relationship between medical marijuana laws (MML) and the prevalence of past-month marijuana use, with perceived availability of marijuana. METHODS: Data were from respondents included in the National Survey of Drug Use and Health restricted use data portal 2004-2013. Multilevel logistic regression of individual-level data was used to test differences between MML and non-MML states and changes in prevalence of past-month marijuana use and perceived availability from before to after passage of MML among adolescents, young adults and older adults controlling for demographics...
October 11, 2016: Drug and Alcohol Dependence
Karen E van den Hondel, Anne Linde Saaltink, Peter Paul M Bender
BACKGROUND: Forensic physicians are responsible for first-line medical care of detainees (individuals held in custody) in the police station. The Dutch police law contains a 'duty of care', which gives the police responsibility for the apparent mentally ill and/or confused people they encounter during their work. The police can ask a forensic physician to do a primary psychiatric assessment of any apparent mentally ill detainee. The forensic physician determines if the apparent mentally ill behavior of the detainee is due to a somatic illness, or has a psychiatric cause for which the detainee needs admission to a psychiatric hospital...
October 11, 2016: Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine
Iwao Kuwajima
Since a concept of Evidence-based Medicine appeared in medical field in 1991, modern medical treatment have been remarkably changed.However, delusive belief of EBM without criticism has brought negative aspect, such as utilization of EBM by companies as a tool of promotion of drug or medical device.Although most of clinical trials were financially supported by drug companies. result of clinical trial does not always ended in favor of test drug or device. When negative results appeared, various way were taken by industry such as usage of SPIN, emphasizing secondary endpoint...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Mary Anne Armstrong, Debbie A Postlethwaite, Jeanne A Darbinian, Mark McCoy, Amy Law
BACKGROUND: In 2007, high-deductible plans were added to the primarily nondeductible Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC) integrated health plan, which had covered 100% of device and procedure costs of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) for members regardless of prescription/visit copay amount. We hypothesized that nondeductible plans and prior LARC use decreased unintended pregnancy. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine if health plan design (nondeductible vs...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Women's Health
Gang Li, Hong-Bing Tao, Jia-Zhi Liao, Jin-Hui Tang, Fang Peng, Qin Shu, Wen-Gang Li, Shun-Gui Tu, Zhuo Chen
Patient safety education is conducive to medical students' cognition on patient safety and to improvement of medical quality and safety. Developing patient safety education for medical students is more and more widely recognized by World Health Organization and countries all over the world. However, in China, patient safety courses aiming at medical students are relatively few, and there are few reports about the effect of patient safety courses. This paper explored the influence of patient safety curriculum on medical students' attitude to and knowledge of patient safety...
October 2016: Journal of Huazhong University of Science and Technology. Medical Sciences
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