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Exercise associated collapse

Susan Taylor, Katie Minor, Cindy L Shmon, G Diane Shelton, Edward E Patterson, James R Mickelson
Completed surveys were obtained from owners of 165 border collies experiencing repeated episodes of abnormal gait or collapse during strenuous exercise. Unremarkable veterinary evaluation and lack of disease progression over time made common systemic, cardiac, and neurologic causes of exercise intolerance unlikely. Survey questions addressed signalment, age of onset, description of episodes, and owner perception of factors associated with collapse. Most dogs were young adults (median 2 y) when episodes began, and they had experienced from two to more than 100 episodes (median six) prior to their owners completing the survey...
September 29, 2016: Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association
Janet Junqing Chu, Heiko J Jahn, Mobarak Hossain Khan, Alexander Kraemer
BACKGROUND: Alcohol use is reported in university students with discrepancy between countries. The study objectives were to assess prevalence and associated factors of alcohol consumption among university students in Germany and China. METHODS: Data used were from 1853 Chinese and 3306 German university students. Alcohol consumption frequency was measured by a question "How often did you drink alcohol in the last three months?" with six possible responses, which were later collapsed into three categories of "At least once a week", "Less than once a week" and "Never"...
2016: Journal of Health, Population, and Nutrition
Daniel J Weinstein, James E Hull, Brittany L Ritchie, Jackie A Hayes, Michael J Morris
RATIONALE: Evaluation of military personnel for exertional dyspnea can present a diagnostic challenge, given multiple unique factors that include wide variation in military deployment. Initial consideration is given to common disorders such as asthma, exercise-induced bronchospasm, and inducible laryngeal obstruction. Excessive dynamic airway collapse has not been reported previously as a cause of dyspnea in these individuals. OBJECTIVES: To describe the clinical and imaging characteristics of military personnel with exertional dyspnea who were found to have excessive dynamic collapse of large airways during exercise...
September 2016: Annals of the American Thoracic Society
Michael W Calik
OBJECTIVE: To review the efficacy of current treatment options for adults with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). METHODS: Review of the literature. RESULTS: OSA, characterized by repetitive ≥ 10-second interruptions (apnea) or reductions (hypopnea) in airflow, is initiated by partial or complete collapse in the upper airway despite respiratory effort. When left untreated, OSA is associated with comorbid conditions, such as cardiovascular and metabolic diseases...
April 2016: Journal of Clinical Outcomes Management: JCOM
Oliver Baum, Eleonora Torchetti, Corinna Malik, Birgitte Hoier, Meegan Walker, Philip J Walker, Adolfo Odriozola, Franziska Graber, Stefan A Tschanz, Jens Bangsbo, Hans Hoppeler, Christopher D Askew, Ylva Hellsten
Intermittent claudication (IC) is the most commonly reported symptom of peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Impaired limb blood flow is a major casual factor of lower exercise tolerance in PAD but cannot entirely explain it. We hypothesized that IC is associated with structural changes of the capillary-mitochondria interface that could contribute to the reduction of exercise tolerance in IC patients. Capillary and mitochondrial morphometry were performed after light and transmission electron microscopy using vastus lateralis muscle biopsies of 14 IC patients and 10 age-matched controls, and peak power output (PPO) was determined for all participants using an incremental single-leg knee-extension protocol...
May 15, 2016: American Journal of Physiology. Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Brian J Krabak, Kelsey M Parker, Anthony DiGirolamo
Exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) is one of the most common causes of exercise-associated collapse. The primary pathogenesis of EAH is largely the result of excessive fluid intake but is influenced by other factors, including hormonal abnormalities (ie, inappropriate arginine vasopressin secretion), renal abnormalities, and mobilization of sodium stores. Early recognition of EAH is crucial to appropriate treatment, because symptoms are varied and may be confused with other causes of exercise-associated collapse...
March 2016: PM & R: the Journal of Injury, Function, and Rehabilitation
Sabine Pohl, Frauke S Roedler, Gerhard U Oechtering
Brachycephalic airway syndrome in dogs is typified by a variety of anatomical abnormalities causing a diverse spectrum of clinical signs of varying intensity. This variability makes the assessment of the surgical outcome after upper airway surgery difficult. Using a structured questionnaire, the present study investigated the dog owner-perceived severity and frequency of a broad spectrum of welfare-relevant impairments 2 weeks before and 6 months after brachycephalic dogs underwent a recently developed multi-level upper airway surgery...
April 2016: Veterinary Journal
Huai-Ren Chang, Jen-Che Hsieh, Shen-Feng Chao, Ji-Hung Wang, Shoei K Stephen Huang
Anomalous origin of the left main coronary artery from the right sinus of Valsalva is extremely rare and can lead to sudden cardiac death. We report a case in which an 18-year-old college student collapsed immediately after a long-distance run of 10 km. After cardiopulmonary resuscitation and electrical shock for ventricular fibrillation, she experienced a return of spontaneous circulation. Cardiac catheterization and cardiac computed tomographic angiography revealed an unusually long intramural course of the left main coronary artery from the right sinus of Valsalva...
December 2015: Texas Heart Institute Journal
Michael L Moritz, James R Lauridson
We report a case of fatal hyponatremic encephalopathy in a child who was forced to exercise as a form of punishment. A 9-year-old girl with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder was forced to run repeated 50-ft sprints to the point of exhaustion by her grandmother as punishment for taking candy from a classmate. After more than 3 hours of forced running, the child collapsed, began to vomit, and had repeated clonic seizures. Upon presentation to the emergency department, she was nonresponsive with a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 11 and had noncardiogenic pulmonary edema with serum sodium of 117 mEq/L...
March 2016: American Journal of Forensic Medicine and Pathology
Maike Margarethe Kleemeyer, Simone Kühn, John Prindle, Nils Christian Bodammer, Lars Brechtel, Alexander Garthe, Gerd Kempermann, Sabine Schaefer, Ulman Lindenberger
This study investigates the effects of fitness changes on hippocampal microstructure and hippocampal volume. Fifty-two healthy participants aged 59-74years with a sedentary lifestyle were randomly assigned to either of two levels of exercise intensity. Training lasted for six months. Physical fitness, hippocampal volumes, and hippocampal microstructure were measured before and after training. Hippocampal microstructure was assessed by mean diffusivity, which inversely reflects tissue density; hence, mean diffusivity is lower for more densely packed tissue...
May 1, 2016: NeuroImage
Mathias Poussel, Philippe Guerci, Pierre Kaminsky, Marie Heymonet, Nathalie Roux-Buisson, Julien Faure, Emilien Fronzaroli, Bruno Chenuel
OBJECTIVE: To describe the possible association (pathophysiologic and clinical features) between exertional heat stroke (EHS) and malignant hyperthermia (MH). BACKGROUND: Both EHS and MH are acute and life-threatening disorders. It has repeatedly been shown that EHS can occur in well-trained patients with known MH-associated mutation in the RYR1 gene in the absence of any extreme environmental conditions or extreme physical activity, thereby supporting a possible link between EHS and MH...
November 2015: Journal of Athletic Training
Yuki Yamada, Satoshi Hiyama, Tsuguyoshi Toyooka, Shoji Takeuchi, Keiji Itabashi, Tatsuya Okubo, Hitoshi Tabata
Analysis of gases emitted from human skin and contained in human breath has received increasing attention in recent years for noninvasive clinical diagnoses and health checkups. Acetone emitted from human skin (skin acetone) should be a good indicator of fat metabolism, which is associated with diet and exercise. However, skin acetone is an analytically challenging target because it is emitted in very low concentrations. In the present study, zeolite was investigated for concentrating skin acetone for subsequent semiconductor-based analysis...
August 4, 2015: Analytical Chemistry
David N Erceg, Lindsey J Anderson, Chun M Nickles, Christianne J Lane, Marc J Weigensberg, E Todd Schroeder
PURPOSE: With the childhood obesity epidemic, efficient methods of exercise are sought to improve health. We tested whether whole body vibration (WBV) exercise can positively affect bone metabolism and improve insulin/glucose dynamics in sedentary overweight Latino boys. METHODS: Twenty Latino boys 8-10 years of age were randomly assigned to either a control (CON) or 3 days/wk WBV exercise (VIB) for 10-wk. RESULTS: Significant increases in BMC (4...
2015: International Journal of Medical Sciences
Mohammad Badran, Bishr Abu Yassin, Nurit Fox, Ismail Laher, Najib Ayas
It is increasingly recognized that disruption of sleep and reduced amounts of sleep can have significant adverse cardiovascular consequences. For example, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common underdiagnosed disorder characterized by recurrent nocturnal asphyxia resulting from repetitive collapse of the upper airway; this leads to repetitive episodes of nocturnal hypoxemia and arousal from sleep. Risk factors for disease include obesity, increased age, male sex, and family history. In epidemiologic studies, OSA appears to be an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and treatment is associated with better outcomes...
July 2015: Canadian Journal of Cardiology
Rajesh Thomas, Susan Jenkins, Peter R Eastwood, Y C Gary Lee, Bhajan Singh
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Pleural effusions have a major impact on the cardiorespiratory system. This article reviews the pathophysiological effects of pleural effusions and pleural drainage, their relationship with breathlessness, and highlights key knowledge gaps. RECENT FINDINGS: The basis for breathlessness in pleural effusions and relief following thoracentesis is not well understood. Many existing studies on the pathophysiology of breathlessness in pleural effusions are limited by small sample sizes, heterogeneous design and a lack of direct measurements of respiratory muscle function...
July 2015: Current Opinion in Pulmonary Medicine
Thomas M Myers, Martin D Hoffman
We present the case of a hiker who died of severe hyponatremia at Grand Canyon National Park. The woman collapsed on the rim shortly after finishing a 5-hour hike into the Canyon during which she was reported to have consumed large quantities of water. First responders transported her to the nearest hospital. En route, she became unresponsive, and subsequent treatment included intravenous normal saline. Imaging and laboratory data at the hospital confirmed hypervolemic hyponatremia with encephalopathy. She never regained consciousness and died of severe cerebral edema less than 24 hours later...
September 2015: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
Richard D Quattrone, E Randy Eichner, Anthony Beutler, W Bruce Adams, Francis G O'Connor
Sickle cell trait (SCT) has been associated with exertional collapse (ECAST) and exercise-related sudden death in athletes and military warfighters. The mechanisms underlying ECAST remain controversial in the sports medicine community. Multiple case presentations and anecdotal reports postulate the role of extraordinary exercise intensity, but other risk factors including dehydration, heat, previous exertional rhabdomyolysis, genetic cofactors, and dietary supplements have been cited as potential contributors...
March 2015: Current Sports Medicine Reports
Terrie M Williams, Lee A Fuiman, Traci Kendall, Patrick Berry, Beau Richter, Shawn R Noren, Nicole Thometz, Michael J Shattock, Edward Farrell, Andy M Stamper, Randall W Davis
Unlike their terrestrial ancestors, marine mammals routinely confront extreme physiological and physical challenges while breath-holding and pursuing prey at depth. To determine how cetaceans and pinnipeds accomplish deep-sea chases, we deployed animal-borne instruments that recorded high-resolution electrocardiograms, behaviour and flipper accelerations of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii) diving from the surface to >200 m. Here we report that both exercise and depth alter the bradycardia associated with the dive response, with the greatest impacts at depths inducing lung collapse...
2015: Nature Communications
E Bani Hassan, M Mirams, A Ghasem-Zadeh, E J Mackie, R C Whitton
REASONS FOR PERFORMING STUDY: To gain a better understanding of the aetiology of articular surface collapse in horses with palmar osteochondral disease. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether acceleration of focal bone resorption associated with reduced physical activity contributes to articular surface collapse in racehorses with palmar osteochondral disease. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study comparing metacarpal bones from horses at varying stages of race training...
March 2016: Equine Veterinary Journal
Morey A Blinder, Sarah Russel
Sickle cell trait (SCT) occurs in about 8% of African-Americans and is often described to be of little clinical consequence. Over time, a number of risks have emerged, and among these are rare but catastrophic episodes of sudden death in athletes and other individuals associated with physical activities which is often described as exercise collapse associated with sickle trait (ECAST). Despite an epidemiologic link between SCT and sudden death as well as numerous case reports in both medical literature and lay press, no clear understanding of the key pathophysiologic events has been identified...
November 19, 2014: Hematology Reports
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