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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27917717/reversal-agents-for-oral-antiplatelet-and-anticoagulant-treatment-during-bleeding-events-current-strategies
#1
Peter Raimondi, Elaine M Hylek, Konstantinos N Aronis
There is an increasing prevalence of cardiovascular diseases that warrant antithrombotic therapy. Antithrombotic therapy includes antiplatelet agents and anticoagulation therapy with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) or non-Vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs). Antithrombotic therapy is associated with increased rates of bleeding. In this review we summarize the evidence and provide strategies for the management of severe bleeding in the setting of antithrombotic therapy. There is limited data on the management of bleeding in the setting of antiplatelet therapy...
December 5, 2016: Current Pharmaceutical Design
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913536/reversal-of-direct-oral-anticoagulants-a-practical-approach
#2
Andrew W Shih, Mark A Crowther
Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have at least noninferior efficacy compared with other oral anticoagulants and have ancillary benefits, including overall better safety profiles, lack of the need for routine monitoring, rapid onset of action, and ease of administration. Reversal of these agents may be indicated in certain situations such as severe bleeding and for perioperative management. DOAC-associated bleeding should be risk stratified: patients with moderate or severe bleeding should have the DOAC discontinued and reversal strategies should be considered...
December 2, 2016: Hematology—the Education Program of the American Society of Hematology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27895055/role-of-agents-for-reversing-the-effects-of-target-specific-oral-anticoagulants
#3
REVIEW
Tanya R Riley, Mary L Gauthier-Lewis, Chelsea K Sanchez, Janine S Douglas
PURPOSE: The available clinical data on target-specific oral anticoagulant (TSOAC) reversal agents that are currently in development or have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are reviewed. SUMMARY: The development of TSOACs such as dabigatran, rivaroxaban, edoxaban, and apixaban has presented benefits and new challenges. One of the main challenges associated with the use of TSOACs is the lack of suitable agent-specific reversal agents. Several treatment options for the management of life-threatening bleeding events associated with TSOAC use, such as fresh frozen plasma, prothrombin complex concentrates, and recombinant coagulation factor VIIa, have been used, with inconsistent results...
November 28, 2016: American Journal of Health-system Pharmacy: AJHP
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27851343/1708-emergent-reversal-of-apixaban-with-andexanet-alfa-to-facilitate-debridement-of-necrotizing-fasciitis
#4
John Fletcher, John Graybill, Carlos Alphonso, Truman Milling, Andrew Cap, Kevin Akers
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2016: Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27789605/reversal-of-anticoagulation-and-management-of-bleeding-in-patients-on-anticoagulants
#5
Prajwal Dhakal, Supratik Rayamajhi, Vivek Verma, Krishna Gundabolu, Vijaya R Bhatt
Bleeding is the most common complication of all anticoagulants. Any bleeding patient on an anticoagulant should be risk-stratified based on hemodynamic instability, source of bleeding, and degree of blood loss. Although minor bleed may be managed with discontinuation of anticoagulant, major bleed may require transfusion of blood products and use of specific antidote. The residual effects of each anticoagulant may be monitored with distinct coagulation assay. Intravenous or oral vitamin K can reverse the effect of warfarin within 24 to 48 hours and is indicated for any bleeding, international normalized ratio of >10 or 4...
October 26, 2016: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/hemostasis
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27778054/-comment-on-andexanet-alfa-for-acute-major-bleeding-associated-with-factor-xa-inhibitors
#6
H Lier, O Grottke
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 24, 2016: Der Anaesthesist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27697443/preclinical-and-clinical-data-for-factor-xa-and-universal-reversal-agents
#7
Truman J Milling, Scott Kaatz
Oral Factor Xa (FXa) inhibitors, a growing class of direct-acting anticoagulants, are frequently used to prevent stroke and systemic embolism in patients with atrial fibrillation and to prevent and treat venous thromboembolism. These drugs reduce the risk of clotting at the expense of increasing the risk of bleeding, and currently they have no specific reversal agent. However, andexanet alfa, a recombinant modified FXa decoy molecule, is in a late-phase clinical trial in bleeding patients, and ciraparantag, a small molecule that appears to reverse many anticoagulants including the FXa inhibitors, is in development...
September 28, 2016: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27697442/discontinuation-and-management-of-direct-acting-anticoagulants-for-emergency-procedures
#8
Jerrold H Levy
Patients taking direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) who then need an emergency invasive procedure require specialized management strategies. Appropriate patient evaluation includes assessment of the current anticoagulation state, including timing of the last dose. DOACs require particular coagulation assays to measure anticoagulation levels accurately, although standard coagulation screening tests may provide qualitative guidance. Specialty societies have endorsed general recommendations for patient management to promote hemostasis in anticoagulated patients requiring surgery or other invasive procedures...
September 29, 2016: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27697438/idarucizumab-and-factor-xa-reversal-agents-role-in-hospital-guidelines-and-protocols
#9
Menno V Huisman, John Fanikos
As expected with all antithrombotic agents, there is a risk of bleeding complications in patients receiving direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) because of the DOAC itself, acute trauma, invasive procedures, or underlying comorbidities. For many bleeding events, a prudent course of action will be to withdraw the DOAC, then "wait and support" the patient, with the expectation that the bleeding event should resolve with time. Likewise, DOAC therapy may be interrupted ahead of a planned procedure, the stopping time being dependent on the agent involved and the patient's renal function...
September 28, 2016: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27697119/-reversal-strategies-for-non-vitamin-k-antagonist-oral-anticoagulants
#10
Frederik Uttenthal Larsen, Anne-Mette Hvas, Erik Lerkevang Grove
Non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are alternatives to vitamin K antagonists and provide consistent anticoagulation with equal or better clinical outcome and no need for routine monitoring. Bleeding is a feared complication of anticoagulants. Until recently, no specific agent has been available for reversal of NOACs. Idarucizumab binds dabigatran for rapid reversal of its activity without procoagulant effects. Andexanet alpha (expected release in 2016) and PER977 are antidotes under clinical development...
October 3, 2016: Ugeskrift for Laeger
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27695508/reversal-agents-of-non-vitamin-k-dependent-anticoagulants-a-rapid-review-of-the-changing-horizon
#11
Supreet Kaur, Abhishek Kumar, Robert G Lerner, Wilbert S Aronow
The newer non-vitamin K dependent anticoagulants (NOACs) have provided a new tool in the armamentarium of physicians treating nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and thromboembolism. Slowly, but steadily, there has been an increased preference of NOACs over vitamin K antagonists. However, the major limiting factor and the concern that precluded their use was lack of reversal in emergent situations. With the advent of reversal agents such as idarucizumab, andexanet alfa and PER977, this gap is also being filled...
October 1, 2016: Archives of Medical Science: AMS
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27659071/nonvitamin-k-antagonist-oral-anticoagulant-activity-challenges-in-measurement-and-reversal
#12
REVIEW
Karen S Brown, Hamim Zahir, Michael A Grosso, Hans J Lanz, Michele F Mercuri, Jerrold H Levy
BACKGROUND: Four nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are approved for the prevention of stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. These include the direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran and the direct factor Xa inhibitors rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban. Bleeding is a complication for all anticoagulants and concerns regarding bleeding risk and the suitability of effective reversal strategies may be a barrier to their prescription...
September 23, 2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27626268/-antidotes-to-novel-direct-oral-anticoagulants
#13
N G Khorev, A P Momot, V O Kon'kova
During the last 10 years, several novel direct oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have entered the clinical arena and were registered in the Russian Federation for use in patients presenting with atrial fibrillation, venous thrombosis, and pulmonary artery thromboembolism. NOACs are classified into two groups: direct thrombin inhibitor (notably dabigatran) and factor Xa inhibitors (including rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban). Their disadvantage is lack of specific antidotes in case of an emergency situation (injury, infarction, stroke requiring thrombolysis, urgent operation)...
2016: Angiologii︠a︡ i Sosudistai︠a︡ Khirurgii︠a︡, Angiology and Vascular Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27625113/measurement-and-reversal-of-the-direct-oral-anticoagulants
#14
Bethany T Samuelson, Adam Cuker
Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) offer noninferior efficacy and improved safety compared to vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) for the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism and for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Unlike VKAs, DOACs do not require routine laboratory monitoring of anticoagulant effect and dose adjustment. In certain situations, however, laboratory assessment of anticoagulant effect may be desirable. Here we review the utility of currently available assays for assessment of DOAC effect and recommend an optimal assessment strategy for each drug, including calibrated dilute thrombin time or ecarin-based assays for dabigatran and calibrated anti-Xa activity assays for the factor Xa inhibitors...
September 2, 2016: Blood Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27575436/preclinical-and-clinical-data-for-factor-xa-and-universal-reversal-agents
#15
Truman J Milling, Scott Kaatz
Oral Factor Xa (FXa) inhibitors, a growing class of direct-acting anticoagulants, are frequently used to prevent stroke and systemic embolism in patients with atrial fibrillation and to prevent and treat venous thromboembolism. These drugs reduce the risk of clotting at the expense of increasing the risk of bleeding, and currently they have no specific reversal agent. However, andexanet alfa, a recombinant modified FXa decoy molecule, is in a late-phase clinical trial in bleeding patients, and ciraparantag, a small molecule that appears to reverse many anticoagulants including the FXa inhibitors, is in development...
November 2016: American Journal of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27573206/andexanet-alfa-for-acute-major-bleeding-associated-with-factor-xa-inhibitors
#16
Stuart J Connolly, Truman J Milling, John W Eikelboom, C Michael Gibson, John T Curnutte, Alex Gold, Michele D Bronson, Genmin Lu, Pamela B Conley, Peter Verhamme, Jeannot Schmidt, Saskia Middeldorp, Alexander T Cohen, Jan Beyer-Westendorf, Pierre Albaladejo, Jose Lopez-Sendon, Shelly Goodman, Janet Leeds, Brian L Wiens, Deborah M Siegal, Elena Zotova, Brandi Meeks, Juliet Nakamya, W Ting Lim, Mark Crowther
Background Andexanet alfa (andexanet) is a recombinant modified human factor Xa decoy protein that has been shown to reverse the inhibition of factor Xa in healthy volunteers. Methods In this multicenter, prospective, open-label, single-group study, we evaluated 67 patients who had acute major bleeding within 18 hours after the administration of a factor Xa inhibitor. The patients all received a bolus of andexanet followed by a 2-hour infusion of the drug. Patients were evaluated for changes in measures of anti-factor Xa activity and were assessed for clinical hemostatic efficacy during a 12-hour period...
September 22, 2016: New England Journal of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27569675/discontinuation-and-management-of-direct-acting-anticoagulants-for-emergency-procedures
#17
Jerrold H Levy
Patients taking direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) who then need an emergency invasive procedure require specialized management strategies. Appropriate patient evaluation includes assessment of the current anticoagulation state, including timing of the last dose. DOACs require particular coagulation assays to measure anticoagulation levels accurately, although standard coagulation screening tests may provide qualitative guidance. Specialty societies have endorsed general recommendations for patient management to promote hemostasis in anticoagulated patients requiring surgery or other invasive procedures...
November 2016: American Journal of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27569673/idarucizumab-and-factor-xa-reversal-agents-role-in-hospital-guidelines-and-protocols
#18
Menno V Huisman, John Fanikos
As expected with all antithrombotic agents, there is a risk of bleeding complications in patients receiving direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) because of the DOAC itself, acute trauma, invasive procedures, or underlying comorbidities. For many bleeding events, a prudent course of action will be to withdraw the DOAC, then "wait and support" the patient, with the expectation that the bleeding event should resolve with time. Likewise, DOAC therapy may be interrupted ahead of a planned procedure, the stopping time being dependent on the agent involved and the patient's renal function...
November 2016: American Journal of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27548686/reversal-agents-for-direct-oral-anticoagulants-understanding-new-and-upcoming-options
#19
Kelly C Rogers, Melanie P Shelton, Shannon W Finks
Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs), originally developed as an alternative for vitamin K antagonists, are shifting the landscape of antithrombotic therapy. DOACs such as dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban offer enhancements in safety, convenience, and efficacy compared with warfarin. However, as choices for oral anticoagulation therapy have increased, so has the need for effectual antidotes before urgent surgical procedures and for the reversal of serious adverse events caused by DOACs. To date, one antidote has been FDA approved in the United States for the reversal of dabigatran, and two antidotes are undergoing phase 2and 3clinical trials...
November 2016: Cardiology in Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27543264/management-of-bleeding-in-patients-treated-with-direct-oral-anticoagulants
#20
REVIEW
Marcel Levi
BACKGROUND: Recently, a new generation of direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs) with a greater specificity towards activated coagulation factors was introduced based on encouraging results for efficacy and safety in clinical studies. An initial limitation of these new drugs was the absence of an adequate strategy to reverse the effect if a bleeding event occurs or an urgent invasive procedure has to be carried out. MAIN TEXT: Specific reversing agents for DOACs have become available, however, and are now evaluated in clinical studies...
August 20, 2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
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