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Host-pathogen interaction

Rebecca L Lamason, Effie Bastounis, Natasha M Kafai, Ricardo Serrano, Juan C Del Álamo, Julie A Theriot, Matthew D Welch
Spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsiae are human pathogens that infect cells in the vasculature. They disseminate through host tissues by a process of cell-to-cell spread that involves protrusion formation, engulfment, and vacuolar escape. Other bacterial pathogens rely on actin-based motility to provide a physical force for spread. Here, we show that SFG species Rickettsia parkeri typically lack actin tails during spread and instead manipulate host intercellular tension and mechanotransduction to promote spread...
October 20, 2016: Cell
Michael R Gillings, Ian T Paulsen, Sasha G Tetu
Antibiotic resistance arises as a consequence of complex interactions among genes, mobile elements, and their bacterial hosts, coupled with the intense selection pressures imposed by humans in an attempt to control bacterial growth. Understanding the evolution of resistance requires an understanding of interacting cellular and genetic components. Here, we review how DNA analysis has helped reconstruct the origins of the mosaic, multiresistant mobile elements that have spread through pathogens in the last 60 years...
October 21, 2016: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Dian-Qiu Lv, Shang-Wu Liu, Jian-Hua Zhao, Bang-Jun Zhou, Shao-Peng Wang, Hui-Shan Guo, Yuan-Yuan Fang
Viroids are plant-pathogenic molecules made up of single-stranded circular non-coding RNAs. How replicating viroids interfere with host silencing remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of a nuclear-replicating Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) on interference with plant RNA silencing. Using transient induction of silencing in GFP transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants (line 16c), we found that PSTVd replication accelerated GFP silencing and increased Virp1 mRNA, which encodes bromodomain-containing viroid-binding protein 1 and is required for PSTVd replication...
October 21, 2016: Scientific Reports
Kristen L Lokken, Gregory T Walker, Renée M Tsolis
Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica serovars (NTS) are generally associated with gastroenteritis; however, the very young and elderly, as well as individuals with compromised immunity, are at risk of developing disseminated infection that can manifest as bacteremia or focal infections at systemic sites. Disseminated NTS infections can be fatal and are responsible for over 600,000 deaths annually. Most of these deaths are in sub-Saharan Africa, where multi-drug resistant NTS clones are currently circulating in a population with a high proportion of individuals that are susceptible to disseminated disease...
October 8, 2016: Pathogens and Disease
Ying Qiao, Yong Mao, Jun Wang, Ruanni Chen, Yong-Quan Su, Jia Chen, Wei-Qiang Zheng
The white-spot disease caused by marine ciliate Cryptocryon irritans hindered the sustainable development of large yellow croaker Larimichthys crocea industry. Better understandings about the parasite-host interactions in the molecular level will facilitate the prevention of mass mortality of the L. crocea caused by white-spot disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small RNA molecules about 20-22 nucleotides which post-transcriptionally regulated many protein-coding genes and involved in many biological processes, especially in host-pathogen responses...
October 17, 2016: Fish & Shellfish Immunology
Roland G Huber, Jan K Marzinek, Daniel A Holdbrook, Peter J Bond
Viral pathogens are a significant source of human morbidity and mortality, and have a major impact on societies and economies around the world. One of the challenges inherent in targeting these pathogens with drugs is the tight integration of the viral life cycle with the host's cellular machinery. However, the reliance of the virus on the host cell replication machinery is also an opportunity for therapeutic targeting, as successful entry- and exit-inhibitors have demonstrated. An understanding of the extracellular and intracellular structure and dynamics of the virion - as well as of the entry and exit pathways in host and vector cells - is therefore crucial to the advancement of novel antivirals...
October 17, 2016: Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology
Benjamin Roche, Virginie Rougeron, Lluis Quintana-Murci, François Renaud, Jessica Lee Abbate, Franck Prugnolle
Malarial infections have long been recognized as a driver of human evolution, as demonstrated by the influence of Plasmodium falciparum on sickle-cell anemia persistence. Duffy-negativity is another blood disorder thought to have been selected because it confers nearly complete resistance against Plasmodium vivax infection. Recent evidence suggests that the benefits of being Duffy-negative cannot be expected to play a strong selective pressure on humans, whereas its costs cannot be considered as negligible...
October 17, 2016: Trends in Parasitology
Shivanand Hegde, Martina Zimmermann, Martina Flöck, Rene Brunthaler, Joachim Spergser, Renate Rosengarten, Rohini Chopra-Dewasthaly
Mycoplasmas are amongst the most successful pathogens of both humans and animals yet the molecular basis of mycoplasma pathogenesis is poorly understood. This is partly due to the lack of classical virulence factors and little similarity to common bacterial pathogenic determinants. Using Mycoplasma agalactiae as a model we initiated research in this direction by screening a transposon mutant library in the natural sheep host using a negative selection method. Having successfully identified putative factors involved in the colonization of local infection and lymphogenic sites, the current study assessed mutants unable to spread systemically in sheep after experimental intramammary infection...
October 20, 2016: Veterinary Research
Ishita Mukherjee, Abhijit Chakraborty, Saikat Chakrabarti
BACKGROUND: An active immune surveillance and a range of barriers to infection allow the host to effectively eliminate microbial pathogens. However, pathogens may use diverse strategies to subdue such host defences. For instance, one such mechanism is the use of leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins by pathogens (microbial) to cause infection. In this study, we aimed at identifying novel virulence factor(s) in Leishmania donovani, based on the possibility of lateral gene transfers of bacterial virulence factor(s) to L...
October 21, 2016: Parasites & Vectors
Kuo-Hsun Chiu, Ling-Hui Wang, Tsung-Ting Tsai, Huan-Yao Lei, Pao-Chi Liao
The secreted proteins of bacteria are usually accompanied by virulence factors, which can cause inflammation and damage host cells. Identifying the secretomes arising from the interactions of bacteria and host cells could, therefore, increase understanding of the mechanisms during initial pathogenesis. The present study used a host-pathogen coculture system of Helicobacter pylori and monocytes (THP-1 cells) to investigate the secreted proteins associated with initial H. pylori pathogenesis. The secreted proteins from the conditioned media from H...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Proteome Research
Jin Kyung Kim, Hye-Mi Lee, Ki-Sun Park, Dong-Min Shin, Tae Sung Kim, Yi Sak Kim, Hyun-Woo Suh, Soo Yeon Kim, In Soo Kim, Jin-Man Kim, Ji-Woong Son, Kyung Mok Sohn, Sung Soo Jung, Chaeuk Chung, Sang-Bae Han, Chul-Su Yang, Eun-Kyeong Jo
Autophagy is an important antimicrobial effector process that defends against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the human pathogen causing tuberculosis (TB). MicroRNAs (miRNAs), endogenous noncoding RNAs, are involved in various biological functions and act as post-transcriptional regulators to target mRNAs. The process by which miRNAs affect antibacterial autophagy and host defense mechanisms against Mtb infections in human monocytes and macrophages is largely uncharacterized. In this study, we show that Mtb significantly induces the expression of MIR144*/hsa-miR-144-5p, which targets the 3'-untranslated region of DRAM2 (DNA damage regulated autophagy modulator 2) in human monocytes and macrophages...
October 20, 2016: Autophagy
Amanda McGuire, Kaitlyn Miedema, Joseph R Fauver, Amber Rico, Tawfik Aboellail, Sandra L Quackenbush, Ann Hawkinson, Tony Schountz
Rodent-borne hantaviruses can cause two human diseases with many pathological similarities: hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) in the western hemisphere and hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in the eastern hemisphere. Each virus is hosted by specific reservoir species without conspicuous disease. HCPS-causing hantaviruses require animal biosafety level-4 (ABSL-4) containment, which substantially limits experimental research of interactions between the viruses and their reservoir hosts. Maporal virus (MAPV) is a South American hantavirus not known to cause disease in humans, thus it can be manipulated under ABSL-3 conditions...
October 18, 2016: Viruses
Voon Kin Chin, Tze Yan Lee, Basir Rusliza, Pei Pei Chong
Candida bloodstream infections remain the most frequent life-threatening fungal disease, with Candida albicans accounting for 70% to 80% of the Candida isolates recovered from infected patients. In nature, Candida species are part of the normal commensal flora in mammalian hosts. However, they can transform into pathogens once the host immune system is weakened or breached. More recently, mortality attributed to Candida infections has continued to increase due to both inherent and acquired drug resistance in Candida, the inefficacy of the available antifungal drugs, tedious diagnostic procedures, and a rising number of immunocompromised patients...
October 18, 2016: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Emily R Troemel
Microsporidia comprise a phylum of obligate intracellular pathogens related to fungi that infect virtually all animals. Recently, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been developed as a convenient model for studying microsporidia infection in a whole-animal host through the identification and characterization of a natural microsporidian pathogen of this commonly studied laboratory organism. The C. elegans natural microsporidian pathogen is named Nematocida parisii, and it causes a lethal intestinal infection in C...
October 2016: Microbiology Spectrum
Stacy L DeBlasio, Richard S Johnson, Michael J MacCoss, Stewart M Gray, Michelle Cilia
Phloem localization of plant viruses is advantageous for acquisition by sap-sucking vectors but hampers host-virus protein interaction studies. In this study, Potato leafroll virus (PLRV)-host protein complexes were isolated from systemically infected potato, a natural host of the virus. Comparing two different co-immunoprecipitation support matrices coupled to mass spectrometry, we identified 44 potato proteins and one viral protein (P1) specifically associated with virus isolated from infected phloem. An additional 142 proteins interact in complex with virus at varying degrees of confidence...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Proteome Research
Yushu Yin, Georgia Papavasiliou, Olga Y Zaborina, John C Alverdy, Fouad Teymour
The human gastrointestinal tract is the primary site of colonization of multidrug resistant pathogens and the major source of life-threatening complications in critically ill and immunocompromised patients. Eradication measures using antibiotics carry further risk of antibiotic resistance. Furthermore, antibiotic treatment can adversely shift the intestinal microbiome toward domination by resistant pathogens. Therefore, approaches directed to prevent replacement of health promoting microbiota with resistant pathogens should be developed...
October 19, 2016: Annals of Biomedical Engineering
Kristin Surmann, Marjolaine Simon, Petra Hildebrandt, Henrike Pförtner, Stephan Michalik, Vishnu M Dhople, Barbara M Bröker, Frank Schmidt, Uwe Völker
To simultaneously obtain proteome data of host and pathogen from an internalization experiment, human alveolar epithelial A549 cells were infected with Staphylococcus aureus HG001 which carried a plasmid (pMV158GFP) encoding a continuously expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP). Samples were taken hourly between 1.5 h and 6.5 h post infection. By fluorescence activated cell sorting GFP-expressing bacteria could be enriched from host cell debris, but also infected host cells could be separated from those which did not carry bacteria after contact (exposed)...
June 2016: Data in Brief
Camila Henriques Coelho, Adriana Oliveira Costa, Ana Carolina Carvalho Silva, Maíra Mazzoni Pucci, Angela Vieira Serufo, Haendel Goncalves Nogueira Oliveira Busatti, Maurício Durigan, Jonas Perales, Alex Chapeaurouge, Daniel Almeida da Silva E Silva, Maria Aparecida Gomes, Juliano Simões Toledo, Steven M Singer, Rosiane A Silva-Pereira, Ana Paula Fernandes
The zoonotic potential of giardiasis, as proposed by WHO since the late 70's, has been largely confirmed in this century. The genetic assemblages A and B of Giardia duodenalis are frequently isolated from human and canine hosts. Most of the assemblage A strains are not infective to adult mice, which can limit the range of studies regarding to biology of G. duodenalis, including virulence factors and the interaction with host immune system. This study aimed to determine the infectivity in mice of an assemblage A Giardia duodenalis strain (BHFC1) isolated from a dog and to classify the strain in sub-assemblages (AI, AII, AIII) through the phylogenetic analysis of beta-giardin (bg), triose phosphate isomerase (tpi) and glutamate dehydrogenase (gdh) genes...
2016: PloS One
Kayvan Etebari, Sultan Asad, Guangmei Zhang, Sassan Asgari
Long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) are appearing as an important class of regulatory RNAs with a variety of biological functions. The aim of this study was to identify the lincRNA profile in the dengue vector Aedes aegypti and evaluate their potential role in host-pathogen interaction. The majority of previous RNA-Seq transcriptome studies in Ae. aegypti have focused on the expression pattern of annotated protein coding genes under different biological conditions. Here, we used 35 publically available RNA-Seq datasets with relatively high depth to screen the Ae...
October 2016: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Micheline N Ngaki, Bing Wang, Binod B Sahu, Subodh K Srivastava, Mohammad S Farooqi, Sekhar Kambakam, Sivakumar Swaminathan, Madan K Bhattacharyya
Fusarium virguliforme causes the serious disease sudden death syndrome (SDS) in soybean. Host resistance to this pathogen is partial and is encoded by a large number of quantitative trait loci, each conditioning small effects. Breeding SDS resistance is therefore challenging and identification of single-gene encoded novel resistance mechanisms is becoming a priority to fight this devastating this fungal pathogen. In this transcriptomic study we identified a few putative soybean defense genes, expression of which is suppressed during F...
2016: PloS One
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