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Microbiome R

Francesco Multinu, Sean C Harrington, Jun Chen, Patricio R Jeraldo, Stephen Johnson, Nicholas Chia, Marina R Walther-Antonio
Variability in representation of microbial communities can be caused by differences in microbial composition or artifacts introduced at sample collection or processing. Alterations in community representation introduced by variations in starting DNA concentrations have not been systematically investigated in stool samples. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of the genomic DNA (gDNA) concentration in the resulting 16S rRNA gene library composition and compare its effect to other sample processing variables in homogenized human fecal material...
March 2018: MSphere
Bethany M Henrick, Andra A Hutton, Michelle C Palumbo, Giorgio Casaburi, Ryan D Mitchell, Mark A Underwood, Jennifer T Smilowitz, Steven A Frese
Historically, Bifidobacterium species were reported as abundant in the breastfed infant gut. However, recent studies in resource-rich countries show an increased abundance of taxa regarded as signatures of dysbiosis. It is unclear whether these differences are the product of genetics, geographic factors, or interventions such as formula feeding, antibiotics, and caesarean section. Fecal pH is strongly associated with Bifidobacterium abundance; thus, pH could be an indicator of its historical abundance. A review of 14 clinical studies published between 1926 and 2017, representing more than 312 healthy breastfed infants, demonstrated a change in fecal pH from 5...
March 2018: MSphere
D Pagliari, A Saviano, E E Newton, M L Serricchio, A A Dal Lago, A Gasbarrini, R Cianci
Gut microbiota is key to the development and modulation of the mucosal immune system. It plays a central role in several physiological functions, in the modulation of inflammatory signaling and in the protection against infections. In healthy states, there is a perfect balance between commensal and pathogens, and microbiota and the immune system interact to maintain gut homeostasis. The alteration of such balance, called dysbiosis, determines an intestinal bacterial overgrowth which leads to the disruption of the intestinal barrier with systemic translocation of pathogens...
2018: Mediators of Inflammation
Lesley Hoyles, Tom Snelling, Umm-Kulthum Umlai, Jeremy K Nicholson, Simon R Carding, Robert C Glen, Simon McArthur
BACKGROUND: Gut microbiota composition and function are symbiotically linked with host health and altered in metabolic, inflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders. Three recognised mechanisms exist by which the microbiome influences the gut-brain axis: modification of autonomic/sensorimotor connections, immune activation, and neuroendocrine pathway regulation. We hypothesised interactions between circulating gut-derived microbial metabolites, and the blood-brain barrier (BBB) also contribute to the gut-brain axis...
March 21, 2018: Microbiome
X J Wang, J H Feng, M H Zhang, X M Li, D D Ma, S S Chang
The intestinal microbiome has been shown to influence animal nutrient metabolism and immune homeostasis. The present study aimed to examine the effect of heat stress on the intestinal microbiome of broilers using pyrosequencing technologies. Ninety-six Arbor Acres broiler chicks were allocated to thermoneutral control (TC; 21 ± 1°C) and high ambient temperature (HT; 31 ± 1°C) groups (6 cages of 8 birds per group), respectively, and raised in 2 controlled climate chambers from 28 to 42 d old. Genomic DNA was extracted from ileal contents isolated from 6 male broiler chicks of each group at 42 d old, and then amplified based on the V3-4 hyper-variable region of 16S rRNA...
March 16, 2018: Poultry Science
Ted R Mikuls, Clay Walker, Fang Qiu, Fang Yu, Geoffrey M Thiele, Barnett Alfant, Eric C Li, Lisa Y Zhao, Gary P Wang, Susmita Datta, Jeffrey B Payne
Objectives: To profile and compare the subgingival microbiome of RA patients with OA controls. Methods: RA (n = 260) and OA (n = 296) patients underwent full-mouth examination and subgingival samples were collected. Bacterial DNA was profiled using 16 S rRNA Illumina sequencing. Following data filtering and normalization, hierarchical clustering analysis was used to group samples. Multivariable regression was used to examine associations of patient factors with membership in the two largest clusters...
March 19, 2018: Rheumatology
Kateryna Zhalnina, Katherine B Louie, Zhao Hao, Nasim Mansoori, Ulisses Nunes da Rocha, Shengjing Shi, Heejung Cho, Ulas Karaoz, Dominique Loqué, Benjamin P Bowen, Mary K Firestone, Trent R Northen, Eoin L Brodie
Like all higher organisms, plants have evolved in the context of a microbial world, shaping both their evolution and their contemporary ecology. Interactions between plant roots and soil microorganisms are critical for plant fitness in natural environments. Given this co-evolution and the pivotal importance of plant-microbial interactions, it has been hypothesized, and a growing body of literature suggests, that plants may regulate the composition of their rhizosphere to promote the growth of microorganisms that improve plant fitness in a given ecosystem...
March 19, 2018: Nature Microbiology
Andrew K Fuller, Benjamin D Bice, Ashlee R Venancio, Olivia M Crowley, Ambur M Staab, Stephanie J Georges, Julio R Hidalgo, Annika V Warncke, Melinda L Angus-Hill
Several recent studies have illustrated the beneficial effects of living in an enriched environment on improving human disease. In mice, environmental enrichment (EE) reduces tumorigenesis by activating the mouse immune system, or affects tumor bearing animal survival by stimulating the wound repair response, including improved microbiome diversity, in the tumor microenvironment. Provided here is a detailed procedure to assess the effects of environmental enrichment on the biodiversity of the microbiome in a mouse colon tumor model...
February 28, 2018: Journal of Visualized Experiments: JoVE
Ma Del Carmen Orozco-Mosqueda, Ma Del Carmen Rocha-Granados, Bernard R Glick, Gustavo Santoyo
A plant microbiome includes a microbial community that typically interacts extensively with a plant. The plant microbiome can survive either inside or outside of plant tissues, performing various plant beneficial activities including biocontrol of potential phytopathogens and promotion of plant growth. An important part of the plant microbiome includes plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) that commonly reside in the rhizosphere and phyllosphere, and as endophytic bacteria (inside of plant tissues). As new plant microbiome-manipulating strategies have emerged in recent years, we have critically reviewed relevant literature, chiefly from the last decade...
March 2018: Microbiological Research
Joseph P Receveur, Jennifer L Pechal, M Eric Benbow, Gary Donato, Tadhgh Rainey, John R Wallace
Ephemeral aquatic habitats and their associated microbial communities (microbiomes) play important roles in the growth and development of numerous aquatic insects, including mosquitoes (Diptera). Biological control agents, such as Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti) or insect growth regulators (e.g., methoprene), are commonly used to control mosquitoes in these habitats. However, it is unknown how commonly used control compounds affect the mosquito internal microbiome and potentially alter their life history traits...
March 17, 2018: Microbial Ecology
Elizabeth Copeland, Katherine Leonard, Richard Carney, Justin Kong, Martin Forer, Yuresh Naidoo, Brian G G Oliver, Justin R Seymour, Stephen Woodcock, Catherine M Burke, Nicholas W Stow
Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is an inflammatory condition that affects up to 12% of the human population in developed countries. Previous studies examining the potential role of the sinus bacterial microbiota within CRS infections have found inconsistent results, possibly because of inconsistencies in sampling strategies. The aim of this study was to determine whether the sinus microbiome is altered in CRS and additionally if the middle meatus is a suitable representative site for sampling the sinus microbiome...
2018: Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology
Linkun Wu, Jun Chen, Zhigang Xiao, Xiaocheng Zhu, Juanying Wang, Hongmiao Wu, Yanhong Wu, Zhongyi Zhang, Wenxiong Lin
The production and quality of Rehmannia glutinosa can be dramatically reduced by replant disease under consecutive monoculture. The root-associated microbiome, also known as the second genome of the plant, was investigated to understand its impact on plant health. Culture-dependent and culture-independent pyrosequencing analysis was applied to assess the shifts in soil bacterial communities in the rhizosphere and rhizoplane under consecutive monoculture. The results show that the root-associated microbiome (including rhizosphere and rhizoplane microbiomes) was significantly impacted by rhizocompartments and consecutive monoculture...
March 14, 2018: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Benjamin Pluvinage, Julie M Grondin, Carolyn Amundsen, Leeann Klassen, Paul E Moote, Yao Xiao, Dallas Thomas, Nicholas A Pudlo, Anuoluwapo Anele, Eric C Martens, G Douglas Inglis, Richard E R Uwiera, Alisdair B Boraston, D Wade Abbott
In red algae, the most abundant principal cell wall polysaccharides are mixed galactan agars, of which agarose is a common component. While bioconversion of agarose is predominantly catalyzed by bacteria that live in the oceans, agarases have been discovered in microorganisms that inhabit diverse terrestrial ecosystems, including human intestines. Here we comprehensively define the structure-function relationship of the agarolytic pathway from the human intestinal bacterium Bacteroides uniformis (Bu) NP1. Using recombinant agarases from Bu NP1 to completely depolymerize agarose, we demonstrate that a non-agarolytic Bu strain can grow on GAL released from agarose...
March 13, 2018: Nature Communications
Robert P Dickson, John R Erb-Downward, Nicole R Falkowski, Ellen M Hunter, Shanna L Ashley, Gary B Huffnagle
RATIONALE: The "gut-lung axis" is commonly invoked to explain the microbiome's influence on lung inflammation. Yet the lungs harbor their own microbiome which is altered in respiratory disease. The relative influence of gut and lung bacteria on lung inflammation is unknown. OBJECTIVES: To determine if baseline lung immune tone reflects local (lung-lung) or remote (gut-lung) microbe-host interactions. METHODS: We compared lung, tongue, and cecal bacteria in forty healthy, genetically-identical 10-week old mice using 16S rRNA gene quantification and sequencing...
March 13, 2018: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
R M Tribe, P D Taylor, N M Kelly, D Rees, J Sandall, H P Kennedy
Caesarean section and instrumental delivery rates are increasing in many parts of the world due to a range of cultural and medical reasons, with limited consideration as to how 'mode of delivery' may impact on childhood and long-term health. However, babies born particularly by pre-labour caesarean section appear to have a subtly different physiology to those born by normal vaginal delivery, with both acute and chronic complications such as respiratory and other morbidities being apparent. It has been hypothesised that inherent mechanisms within the process of labour and vaginal delivery, far from being a passive mechanical process by which the fetus and placenta are expelled from the birth canal, may trigger certain protective developmental processes permissive for normal immunological and physiological development of the fetus postnatally...
March 13, 2018: Journal of Physiology
Daniel R Garza, Marcel C van Verk, Martijn A Huynen, Bas E Dutilh
The environmental metabolome and metabolic potential of microorganisms are dominant and essential factors shaping microbial community composition. Recent advances in genome annotation and systems biology now allow us to semiautomatically reconstruct genome-scale metabolic models (GSMMs) of microorganisms based on their genome sequence1 . Next, growth of these models in a defined metabolic environment can be predicted in silico, mechanistically linking the metabolic fluxes of individual microbial populations to the community dynamics...
March 12, 2018: Nature Microbiology
Sonia Altizer, Daniel J Becker, Jonathan H Epstein, Kristian M Forbes, Thomas R Gillespie, Richard J Hall, Dana M Hawley, Sonia M Hernandez, Lynn B Martin, Raina K Plowright, Dara A Satterfield, Daniel G Streicker
Human-provided resource subsidies for wildlife are diverse, common and have profound consequences for wildlife-pathogen interactions, as demonstrated by papers in this themed issue spanning empirical, theoretical and management perspectives from a range of study systems. Contributions cut across scales of organization, from the within-host dynamics of immune function, to population-level impacts on parasite transmission, to landscape- and regional-scale patterns of infection. In this concluding paper, we identify common threads and key findings from author contributions, including the consequences of resource subsidies for (i) host immunity; (ii) animal aggregation and contact rates; (iii) host movement and landscape-level infection patterns; and (iv) interspecific contacts and cross-species transmission...
May 5, 2018: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
Fiona Newberry, Shen-Yuan Hsieh, Tom Wileman, Simon R Carding
Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME)/chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) (ME/CFS) is a disabling and debilitating disease of unknown aetiology. It is a heterogeneous disease characterized by various inflammatory, immune, viral, neurological and endocrine symptoms. Several microbiome studies have described alterations in the bacterial component of the microbiome (dysbiosis) consistent with a possible role in disease development. However, in focusing on the bacterial components of the microbiome, these studies have neglected the viral constituent known as the virome...
March 15, 2018: Clinical Science (1979-)
Janessa Pickering, Teck Hui Teo, Ruth B Thornton, Lea-Ann Kirkham, Graeme R Zosky, Holly D Clifford
Exposure to environmental geogenic (or earth-derived) dust can lead to more frequent and severe infections in the human airway. Particulate matter < 10 µm (PM10 ) is the component of air pollution that is commonly associated with the exacerbation of respiratory diseases. We have previously demonstrated that mice exposed to geogenic dust PM10 experienced an exacerbation of inflammatory responses to influenza A virus. Whether geogenic dust PM10 also exacerbates respiratory bacterial infection is not yet known, nor are the components of the dust that drive these responses...
March 6, 2018: Environmental Research
Matthew R Panasevich, Umesh D Wankhade, Sree V Chintapalli, Kartik Shankar, R Scott Rector
BACKGROUND: The gut microbiome plays a critical role in the onset and progression of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. However, it is not well documented whether the cecal versus the fecal microbiome is more relevant when assessing its contribution to these diseases. Here, we amplified the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene from cecal and fecal samples of female Ossabaw swine fed a low fat control diet (10.5% fat; n=4) or Western diet (43.0% fat; 17.8% high fructose corn syrup; 2% cholesterol; n=3) for 36 weeks...
March 9, 2018: Physiological Genomics
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