Read by QxMD icon Read

Sleep disordered-breathing

Sairam Parthasarathy, Mary A Carskadon, Girardin Jean-Louis, Judith Owens, Adam Bramoweth, Daniel Combs, Lauren Hale, Elizabeth Harrison, Chantelle N Hart, Brant P Hasler, Sarah M Honaker, Elisabeth Hertenstein, Samuel Kuna, Clete Kushida, Jessica C Levenson, Caitlin Murray, Allan I Pack, Vivek Pillai, Kristi Pruiksma, Azizi Seixas, Patrick Strollo, Saurabh S Thosar, Natasha Williams, Daniel Buysse
A wealth of scientific knowledge is being generated in sleep and circadian science. In order for us to realize the return on investment for such scientific knowledge and to improve the health of the nation, we need to disseminate and implement research findings into practice. An implementation gap - termed a "quality chasm" by the Institutes of Medicine - separates the scientific knowledge we possess and the implementation of such knowledge into preventative interventions or healthcare treatments. It is frequently reported that a time lag of 17 years transpires before medical research reaches clinical practice...
October 10, 2016: Sleep
Martin A Alpert, Jad Omran, Brian P Bostick
Obesity produces a variety of hemodynamic alterations that may cause changes in cardiac morphology which predispose to left and right ventricular dysfunction. Various neurohormonal and metabolic alterations commonly associated with obesity may contribute to these abnormalities of cardiac structure and function. These changes in cardiovascular hemodynamics, cardiac morphology, and ventricular function may, in severely obese patients, predispose to heart failure, even in the absence of other forms of heart disease (obesity cardiomyopathy)...
October 15, 2016: Current Obesity Reports
Stephanie O Zandieh, Amarilis Cespedes, Adam Ciarleglio, Wallace Bourgeois, David M Rapoport, Jean-Marie Bruzzese
OBJECTIVE: Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) has not been well studied in urban adolescents with asthma in community settings. Nor has the association of SDB symptoms and asthma severity been studied. We characterized self-reported symptoms suggesting SDB and investigated the association of SDB symptoms, probable asthma, and asthma severity. METHODS: 9,565 adolescents from 21 inner-city high schools were screened for an asthma intervention study. Students reported on symptoms suggesting SDB using questions from the 2007 NHANES, if they were ever diagnosed with asthma, and on asthma symptoms...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Asthma: Official Journal of the Association for the Care of Asthma
Abdulghani Sankari, James A Rowley
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 15, 2016: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
E Sh Bairambekov, A V Pevzner, A Yu Litvin, O A Fomicheva
The case history of a 46-year-old patient with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome was analyzed. The examination revealed fourth-degree obesity, prior myocardial infarction, persistent atrial fibrillation with nocturnal asystoles lasting as long as 14.3 sec. During selected drug therapy and regular application of secondary ventilation (continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy) used to correct breathing problems, there was a reduction in the signs of circulatory deficiency, cessation of cardiac pauses, and recovery of sinus rhythm...
2016: Terapevticheskiĭ Arkhiv
Matthieu Dubois, Cécile Chenivesse, Mathieu Raux, Adrian Morales-Robles, Marie-Cécile Nierat, Gilles Garcia, Xavier Navarro-Sune, Mario Chavez, Jacques Martinerie, Thomas Similowski
: Spontaneous ventilation in mammals is driven by automatic brainstem networks that generate the respiratory rhythm and increase ventilation in the presence of increased carbon dioxide production. Hypocapnia decreases the drive to breathe and induces apnea. In humans, this occurs during sleep but not during wakefulness. We hypothesized that hypocapnic breathing would be associated with respiratory-related cortical activity similar to that observed during volitional breathing, inspiratory constraints, or in patients with defective automatic breathing (preinspiratory potentials)...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
Christian Guilleminault, Shehlanoor Huseni, Lauren Lo
A short lingual frenulum has been associated with difficulties in sucking, swallowing and speech. The oral dysfunction induced by a short lingual frenulum can lead to oral-facial dysmorphosis, which decreases the size of upper airway support. Such progressive change increases the risk of upper airway collapsibility during sleep. Clinical investigation of the oral cavity was conducted as a part of a clinical evaluation of children suspected of having sleep disordered breathing (SDB) based on complaints, symptoms and signs...
July 2016: ERJ Open Research
Maria Pia Villa, Hanaa Shafiek, Melania Evangelisti, Jole Rabasco, Manuela Cecili, Marilisa Montesano, Mario Barreto
The sleep clinical record (SCR) may be a valid method for detecting children with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). This study aimed to evaluate whether there were differences in SCR depending on age and to identify the possible risk factors for OSA development. We enrolled children with sleep disordered breathing between 2013 and 2015, and divided them according to age into preschool- and school-age groups. All patients underwent SCR and polysomnography. OSA was detected in 81.1% and 83.6% of preschool- and school-age groups, respectively...
January 2016: ERJ Open Research
Jorge Soliz, Rose Tam, Richard Kinkead
Perinatal exposure to adverse experiences disrupts brain development, including the brainstem network that regulates breathing. At adulthood, rats previously subjected to stress (in the form of neonatal maternal separation; NMS) display features reported in patients suffering from sleep disordered breathing, including an increased hypoxic ventilatory response and hypertension. This effect is also sex-specific (males only). Based on these observations, we hypothesized that NMS augments the carotid body's O2-chemosensitivity...
2016: Frontiers in Physiology
J S Park, D K Chan, S R Parikh, A K Meyer, K W Rosbe
OBJECTIVE: To study the efficacy of surgical management for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome in children with hypotonia, and to identify common anatomic sites of airway obstruction. METHODS: Retrospective chart review of polysomnographic parameters and quality of life instrument scores for seventy eight children with hypotonia who underwent surgical intervention for sleep-disordered breathing at two tertiary children's hospitals, and analysis of drug-induced sleep endoscopy data using a previously validated scoring system...
November 2016: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
Howard Faden, Vincent Callanan, Michael Pizzuto, Mark Nagy, Mark Wilby, Daryl Lamson, Brian Wrotniak, Stefan Juretschko, Kirsten St George
BACKGROUND: Airway obstruction due to enlargement of tonsils and adenoids is a common pediatric problem resulting in sleep disordered breathing. The cause for the relatively abnormal growth of tonsils and adenoids is poorly understood. METHODS: Non-acutely ill children undergoing tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy (T&A) for various reasons were enrolled prospectively in a study to determine the frequency of asymptomatic respiratory viral infections in each lymphoid tissue and to relate the number and types of virus to the degree of airway obstruction...
November 2016: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
Wei-Te Wu, Su-Shan Tsai, Yu-Jen Lin, Ming-Hsiu Lin, Trong-Neng Wu, Tung-Sheng Shih, Saou-Hsing Liou
BACKGROUND: Professional drivers' work under conditions predisposes them for development of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the effect of SDB on CVD risk among professional drivers has never been investigated. A cohort study was used to evaluate the effectiveness of overnight pulse oximeter as a sleep apnea screening tool to assess the 8-year risk of CVD events. METHODS: The Taiwan Bus Driver Cohort Study (TBDCS) recruited 1014 professional drivers in Taiwan since 2005...
September 29, 2016: International Journal of Cardiology
Samuel A Mickelson
Obstructive sleep apnea is a common condition, primarily caused by narrowing of the nasal and pharyngeal airway. Treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is considered the first line of therapy, but long-term compliance is only about 40%, often because of nasal obstruction. Any nasal obstruction can worsen CPAP compliance. Treatment of the nasal obstruction with topical nasal steroid sprays or nasal dilators has been shown to improve sleep disordered breathing. Surgical treatment of nasal obstruction, has been shown to improve sleep disordered breathing, as well as CPAP requirement and compliance with CPAP...
October 6, 2016: Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
Pnina Weiss, Meir Kryger
Positive airway pressure (PAP) is considered first-line therapy for moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea and may also be considered for mild obstructive sleep apnea, particularly if it is symptomatic or there are concomitant cardiovascular disorders. Continuous PAP is most commonly used. Other modes, such as bilevel airway pressure, autotitrating positive airway pressure, average volume assured pressure support, and adaptive support ventilation, play important roles in the management of sleep-related breathing disorders...
October 6, 2016: Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
Girish Manjunath, Prakash Rao, Nagendra Prakash, B K Shivaram
Recent data from landmark trials suggest that the indications for cardiac pacing and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are set to expand to include heart failure, sleep-disordered breathing, and possibly routine implantation in patients with myocardial infarction and poor ventricular function.[1] This will inevitably result in more patients with cardiac devices undergoing surgeries. Perioperative electromagnetic interference and their potential effects on ICDs pose considerable challenges to the anesthesiologists...
October 2016: Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia
Ali Yilmaz, Melike Akçaalan
BACKGROUND: Clinical detection of anatomic narrowing of the upper airway may faciliate early recognition of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The aim of this study was to investigate whether anthropometric measurement can be used to predict OSA. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 147 subject were included from those who were referred patients for suspected sleep apnea to our sleep laboratory. All patients were divided 2 groups with respect to the apnea-hypopnea index. The first group was diagnosed as OSA, AHI greater than 5...
October 7, 2016: Folia Morphologica (Warsz)
Glenn Harvin, Eslam Ali, Amit Raina, William Leland, Sabeen Abid, Zahid Vahora, Hossein Movahed, Sumyra Kachru, Rick Tee
BACKGROUND: This pilot study examined airway characteristics during upper endoscopy to determine who is at high risk for obstructive sleep apnea. METHODS: Patients undergoing routine upper endoscopy were divided into 2 groups according to the Berlin Questionnaire (high and low risk for sleep disordered breathing). Patients underwent routine upper endoscopy using propofol sedation. The airway was then evaluated for no, partial, or complete collapse at the levels of the palate/uvula/tonsils, the tongue base, the hypopharynx, and the larynx...
October 2016: Annals of Gastroenterology: Quarterly Publication of the Hellenic Society of Gastroenterology
Antonio Maria Esquinas, Luca Salvatore De Santo
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 29, 2016: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine: JCSM: Official Publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine
Ying Y Zhao, Jia Weng, Daniel R Mobley, Rui Wang, Younghoon Kwon, Phyllis C Zee, Pamela L Lutsey, Susan Redline
STUDY OBJECTIVES: Type 3 home sleep apnea tests may underestimate the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) due to overestimation of total sleep time (TST). We aimed to evaluate the effect of manual editing of the total recording time (TRT) on the TST and AHI. METHODS: Thirty 15-channel in-home polysomnography studies (AHI 0 to 30 events/h) scored using American Academy of Sleep Medicine criteria were rescored by two blinded polysomnologists after data from electroencephalogram, electrooculogram, and electromyogram were masked...
September 29, 2016: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine: JCSM: Official Publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine
Fernando R Carvalho, Débora A Lentini-Oliveira, Lucila Bf Prado, Gilmar F Prado, Luciane Bc Carvalho
BACKGROUND: Apnoea is a breathing disorder marked by the absence of airflow at the nose or mouth. In children, risk factors include adenotonsillar hypertrophy, obesity, neuromuscular disorders and craniofacial anomalies. The most common treatment for obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) in childhood is adeno-tonsillectomy. This approach is limited by its surgical risks, mostly in children with comorbidities and, in some patients, by recurrence that can be associated with craniofacial problems...
October 5, 2016: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"