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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27900171/priorities-for-injury-prevention-in-women-s-australian-football-a-compilation-of-national-data-from-different-sources
#1
Lauren V Fortington, Caroline F Finch
BACKGROUND/AIM: Participation in Australian football (AF) has traditionally been male dominated and current understanding of injury and priorities for prevention are based solely on reports of injuries in male players. There is evidence in other sports that indicates that injury types differ between males and females. With increasing participation in AF by females, it is important to consider their specific injury and prevention needs. This study aimed to provide a first injury profile from existing sources for female AF...
2016: BMJ Open Sport & Exercise Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27893897/imaging-of-glial-cell-activation-and-white-matter-integrity-in-brains-of-active-and-recently-retired-national-football-league-players
#2
Jennifer M Coughlin, Yuchuan Wang, Il Minn, Nicholas Bienko, Emily B Ambinder, Xin Xu, Matthew E Peters, John W Dougherty, Melin Vranesic, Soo Min Koo, Hye-Hyun Ahn, Merton Lee, Chris Cottrell, Haris I Sair, Akira Sawa, Cynthia A Munro, Christopher J Nowinski, Robert F Dannals, Constantine G Lyketsos, Michael Kassiou, Gwenn Smith, Brian Caffo, Susumu Mori, Tomas R Guilarte, Martin G Pomper
Importance: Microglia, the resident immune cells of the central nervous system, play an important role in the brain's response to injury and neurodegenerative processes. It has been proposed that prolonged microglial activation occurs after single and repeated traumatic brain injury, possibly through sports-related concussive and subconcussive injuries. Limited in vivo brain imaging studies months to years after individuals experience a single moderate to severe traumatic brain injury suggest widespread persistent microglial activation, but there has been little study of persistent glial cell activity in brains of athletes with sports-related traumatic brain injury...
November 28, 2016: JAMA Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27893483/game-times-and-higher-winning-percentages-of-west-coast-teams-of-the-national-football-league-correspond-with-reduced-prevalence-of-regular-season-injury
#3
Allison J Brager, R Justin Mistovich
West coast teams of the National Football League (NFL) are more statistically likely to win home night games against east coast opponents. The alignment of game times with daily rhythms of alertness is thought to contribute to this advantage. The present study aims to determine if rates of turnovers and injuries during the regular season, putative measures of mental and physical fatigue, impact winning percentages. Regular season schedules and rates of turnovers for each of the thirty-two teams were obtained from Pro-Football-Reference...
November 16, 2016: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27875493/acute-lumbar-paraspinal-myonecrosis-in-football-players-with-sickle-cell-trait-a-case-series
#4
E Randy Eichner, Brock Schnebel, Scott Anderson, James R Clugston, Heath Hale, Charlie Michaudet, John M Small
We report 6 cases of a novel syndrome of acute, exertional low back pain (LBP) in football players, 5 in college and one in the National Football League (NFL). All 6 are African-Americans with sickle cell trait (SCT). The acute LBP is severe and can be disabling, and the condition can be confused with muscle strain, discogenic pain, stress fracture, or other problems in athletes. Our evidence shows that this syndrome is caused by lumbar paraspinal myonecrosis (LPSMN), which likely often contributes to the lumbar paraspinal compartment syndrome...
November 21, 2016: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27870090/the-dual-role-of-nfl-team-doctors
#5
Marvin Washington
Glenn Cohen, Holly Fernandez Lynch, and Christopher Deubert are right in their article "A Proposal to Address NFL Club Doctors' Conflicts of Interest and to Promote Player Trust" that the problem with the medical care rendered to National Football League players is not that the doctors are bad, but that the system in which they provide care is structured badly. We saw some of the problems this system causes last season in what happened to Case Kenum, a quarterback for the Los Angeles Rams who, despite having a possible concussion from a game injury, was allowed to continue to play, with a concussion spotter in the booth and coaches, teammates, seven game officials, and two full training staffs present...
November 2016: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27870087/nfl-physicians-committed-to-excellence-in-patient-player-care
#6
(no author information available yet)
The National Football League Physicians Society read with disappointment the article "A Proposal to Address NFL Club Doctors' Conflicts of Interest and to Promote Player Trust." In spite of the authors' suggestions, NFL physicians are accomplished medical professionals who abide by the highest ethical standards in providing treatment to all of their patients, including those who play in the NFL. It defies logic for the authors not to have engaged experienced and active NFL physicians from the very start of their effort to explore, challenge, and recommend significant alterations to the delivery of health care to NFL players...
November 2016: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27870086/health-care-for-nfl-players-upholding-physician-standards-and-enhancing-the-doctor-patient-relationship
#7
Laurent Duvernay-Tardif
Beginning my third year with the Kansas City Chiefs and being also a medical student at McGill University, I was at first a little reluctant to comment on Glenn Cohen et al.'s critique of the National Football League's structure involving player health and team doctors, but the opportunity to provide a perspective as both a football player and a medical student was too much to forgo. Because of my athletic and academic background, I am often asked what I think about injuries in professional sports and about the role of sports medicine physicians, and Cohen et al...
November 2016: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27870084/a-response-to-commentaries
#8
I Glenn Cohen, Holly Fernandez Lynch, Christopher R Deubert
Our article "NFL Player Health Care: Addressing Club Doctors' Conflicts of Interests and Promoting Player Trust" focused on an inherent structural conflict that faces club doctors in the National Football League. The conflict stems from club doctors' dual role of providing medical care to players and providing strategic advice to clubs. We recommended assigning these roles to different individuals, with the medical staff members who are responsible for providing player care being chosen and subject to review and termination by a committee of medical experts selected equally by the NFL and the NFL Players Association...
November 2016: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27870083/being-right-isn-t-always-enough-nfl-culture-and-team-physicians-conflict-of-interest
#9
Ross McKinney
The job of being a sports team physician is difficult, regardless of the level, from high school to the National Football League. When a sports league receives the intensity of attention leveled at the NFL, though, a difficult occupation becomes even more challenging. Even for the NFL players themselves, players' best interests regarding health issues are often unclear. Football players are, as a lot, highly competitive individuals. They want to win, and they want to help the team win. It's a warrior culture, and respect is earned by playing hurt...
November 2016: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27870082/a-proposal-to-address-nfl-club-doctors-conflicts-of-interest-and-to-promote-player-trust
#10
I Glenn Cohen, Holly Fernandez Lynch, Christopher R Deubert
How can we ensure that players in the National Football League receive excellent health care they can trust from providers who are as free from conflicts of interest as realistically possible? NFL players typically receive care from the club's own medical staff. Club doctors are clearly important stakeholders in player health. They diagnose and treat players for a variety of ailments, physical and mental, while making recommendations to the player concerning those ailments. At the same time, club doctors have obligations to the club, namely to inform and advise clubs about the health status of players...
November 2016: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27870080/players-doctors-the-roles-should-be-very-clear
#11
Arthur L Caplan, Brendan Parent, Lee H Igel
Years ago, one of us had the opportunity to talk with a starting guard in the National Basketball Association about his health care. The player, then a rookie, did not have his own personal doctor. Instead, he received his health care from the team doctor. This athlete was very well paid and could have received care anywhere he wished in the area. But he came from a very poor neighborhood. Growing up, he said, he had no health care other than hearing and eye tests done at his school and maybe (he was not sure) vaccinations given by the school nurse...
November 2016: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27826598/variables-affecting-return-to-play-after-anterior-cruciate-ligament-injury-in-the-national-football-league
#12
Emmanuel D Eisenstein, Nathaniel L Rawicki, Nicholas J Rensing, Nicholas A Kusnezov, Joseph T Lanzi
BACKGROUND: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are common in the National Football League (NFL). Limited literature exists regarding return to play (RTP) and the factors affecting RTP after ACL reconstruction in NFL players. PURPOSE/HYPOTHESIS: To determine RTP rates after ACL reconstruction in NFL players and to ascertain which variables affect RTP in these players. We hypothesized that RTP in this population will be less than in the general population and similar to the limited studies published previously...
October 2016: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27793805/superior-labrum-anterior-posterior-tears-in-the-national-football-league
#13
Caitlin C Chambers, T Sean Lynch, Daniel B Gibbs, Jason H Ghodasra, Shawn Sahota, Kristina Franke, Christina D Mack, Gordon W Nuber
BACKGROUND: Shoulder disorders are common in football players, with up to 50% of National Football League (NFL) recruits reporting a history of shoulder injuries. Superior labrum anterior-posterior (SLAP) tears are an entity with well-described detrimental effects on return to play in overhead-throwing athletes but with minimal data in contact athletes. PURPOSE: To identify the incidence, predisposing factors, and effect of SLAP tears in NFL athletes and prospects as well as the treatment patterns of NFL team physicians...
October 28, 2016: American Journal of Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27781193/catastrophic-cervical-spine-injuries-in-contact-sports
#14
Michael James Hutton, Robert A McGuire, Robert Dunn, Richard Williams, Peter Robertson, Bruce Twaddle, Patrick Kiely, Andrew Clarke, Keyvan Mazda, Paul Davies, Krystle T Pagarigan, Joseph R Dettori
Study Design Systematic review. Objectives To determine the incidence of catastrophic cervical spine injuries (CCSIs) among elite athletes participating in contact team sports and whether the incidence varies depending on the use of protective gear or by player position. Methods Electronic databases and reference lists of key articles published from January 1, 2000, to January 29, 2016, were searched. Results Fourteen studies were included that reported CCSI in rugby (n = 10), American football (n = 3), and Irish hurling (n = 1)...
November 2016: Global Spine Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27780175/player-selection-bias-in-national-football-league-draftees
#15
Kyle S Beyer, David H Fukuda, Michael J Redd, Jeffrey R Stout, Jay R Hoffman
Beyer, KS, Fukuda, DH, Redd, MJ, Stout, JR, and Hoffman, JR. Player selection bias in National Football League draftees. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 2965-2971, 2016-Relative age effects (RAEs) have been studied as a potential factor associated with player selection bias in numerous sports. However, little research has examined the role of RAEs among National Football League (NFL) draftees. The purpose of the current study was to determine the existence of RAEs in NFL draftees from the last 10 NFL drafts. Draftee birth dates were collected and divided into calendar and scholastic quarters (SQ1-SQ4)...
November 2016: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27777868/injuries-and-home-advantage-in-the-nfl
#16
Marshall B Jones
BACKGROUND: In the first decade of this century players in the National Football League, the NFL community, fans, even the public at large, became aware that multiple concussions, heretofore considered inconsequential, could have devastating consequences later in life. RESULTS: Since 1978, each one of the 32 teams in the NFL plays 16 games in the regular season. In the 25 years from 1978 to 2004 home advantage in the regular season tended to increase with Game Number (1-16)...
2016: SpringerPlus
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27771170/integrating-social-media-and-anterior-cruciate-ligament-surgery-an-analysis-of-patient-surgeon-and-hospital-use
#17
Prem N Ramkumar, Ton La, Evan Fisch, Peter D Fabricant, Alexander E White, Kristofer J Jones, Samuel A Taylor
PURPOSE: The purpose of this observational study of social media in sports medicine was to investigate and analyze the presence and shared content of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) patients, sports surgeons, and top orthopaedic hospitals on popular social media streams. METHODS: A search of 2 public domains (Instagram and Twitter) was performed over a 6-month period. ACL surgery ("#aclsurgery") was selected for the Instagram-based patient analysis after exclusion of veterinary ACL operations...
October 19, 2016: Arthroscopy: the Journal of Arthroscopic & related Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27749509/does-the-level-of-cervical-disc-herniation-surgery-affect-performance-based-outcomes-in-national-football-league-athletes
#18
Harry T Mai, Robert J Burgmeier, Sean M Mitchell, Andrew C Hecht, Joseph C Maroon, Gordon W Nuber, Wellington K Hsu
STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine whether the level of a cervical disc herniation (CDH) procedure will uniquely impact performance-based outcomes in elite athletes of the National Football League (NFL). SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Comparative assessments of postsurgical outcomes in NFL athletes with CDH at different levels are unknown. Further, the surgical decision-making for these types of injuries in professional football athletes remains controversial...
December 1, 2016: Spine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27747774/does-relative-age-affect-career-length-in-north-american-professional-sports
#19
C Steingröver, N Wattie, J Baker, J Schorer
BACKGROUND: Relative age effects (RAEs) typically favour older members within a cohort; however, research suggests that younger players may experience some long-term advantages, such as longer career length. The purposes of this study were to replicate previous findings on RAEs among National Hockey League (NHL) ice hockey players, National Basketball Association (NBA) basketball players and National Football League (NFL) football players and to investigate the influence of relative age on career length in all three sports...
December 2016: Sports Medicine—Open
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27737288/historical-patterns-and-variation-in-treatment-of-injuries-in-nfl-national-football-league-players-and-ncaa-national-collegiate-athletic-association-division-i-football-players
#20
Eric C McCarty, Matthew J Kraeutler, Paula Langner, Shane Cook, Byron Ellis, Jenna M Godfrey
We conducted a study to identify and contrast patterns in the treatment of common injuries that occur in National Football League (NFL) players and National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I football players. Orthopedic team physicians for all 32 NFL and 119 NCAA Division I football teams were asked to complete a survey regarding demographics and preferred treatment of a variety of injuries encountered in football players. Responses were received from 31 (97%) of the 32 NFL and 111 (93%) of the 119 NCAA team physicians...
September 2016: American Journal of Orthopedics
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