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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28102466/the-care-of-the-ultra-orthodox-jewish-patient
#1
Ezra Gabbay, Matthew W McCarthy, Joseph J Fins
The Ultra-Orthodox Jewish community embraces a system of values and a rigorous behavioral code that are deeply rooted in religious tradition and history. Here we describe some of the unique challenges that stem from the encounter between modern medical practice and the Ultra-Orthodox world. Through examples of clinical and ethical scenarios ranging from prenatal care to end-of-life decisions, we illustrate problems related to observance of age-old practices in a modern hospital setting, balancing acceptance of Divine will with standard risk assessment, reconciliation of patient autonomy with deference to rabbinic authority and fear of stigma associated with mental illness in a traditional society...
January 19, 2017: Journal of Religion and Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28100143/end-of-life-in-high-security-prisons-in-switzerland
#2
Irene Marti, Ueli Hostettler, Marina Richter
Similar to other institutions, the Swiss prison system faces a growing number of elderly prisoners, trends toward securitization, and, in consequence, more prisoners who will spend the end-of-life (EOL) period of time in prison. By law, prisoners should have the same access to care as the rest of the population. However, custody makes meeting the demands of medical and palliative care difficult. This article focuses on the organizational challenges related to EOL care. Based on ethnographic and documentary research, it examines the institutional logic of the prison and the competing "new" logic emerging with EOL care...
January 2017: Journal of Correctional Health Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28100141/caring-to-learn-and-learning-to-care
#3
Kristin G Cloyes, Susan J Rosenkranz, Katherine P Supiano, Patricia H Berry, Meghan Routt, Sarah M Llanque, Kathleen Shannon-Dorcy
The increasing numbers of aging and chronically ill prisoners incarcerated in Western nations is well-documented, as is the growing need for prison-based palliative and end-of-life care. Less often discussed is specifically how end-of-life care can and should be provided, by whom, and with what resources. One strategy incorporates prisoner volunteers into end-of-life services within a peer-care program. This article reports on one such program based on focused ethnographic study including in-depth interviews with inmate hospice volunteers, nursing staff, and corrections officers working in the hospice program...
January 2017: Journal of Correctional Health Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28100139/the-collision-of-inmate-and-patient
#4
Aline Chassagne, Aurélie Godard, Elodie Cretin, Lionel Pazart, Régis Aubry
Every year in France 100 inmates die in prison from illness, but their experiences with end of life (EOL) have not been investigated to date. The purpose of this article is to highlight the realities regarding inmates at the end of life, putting into perspective the viewpoints of the sick prisoners with those of the health and correctional professionals accompanying them. Based on qualitative research, the challenge is to identify potential barriers to palliative care for inmates in order to consider possible improvements...
January 2017: Journal of Correctional Health Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28100061/outpatient-palliative-care-and-aggressiveness-of-end-of-life-care-in-patients-with-metastatic-colorectal-cancer
#5
Si Won Lee, Hyun Jung Jho, Ji Yeon Baek, Eun Kyung Shim, Hyun Mi Kim, Ji Yeon Ku, Eun Jung Nam, Yoon-Jung Chang, Hye Jin Choi, Sun Young Kim
BACKGROUND: Palliative care in outpatient setting has been shown to promote better symptom management and transition to hospice care among patients with advanced cancer. Nevertheless, specialized palliative care is rarely provided at cancer centers in Korea. Herein, we aimed to assess aggressiveness of end-of-life care for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer according to the use of outpatient palliative care (OPC) at a single cancer center in Korea. METHODS: We performed a retrospective medical record review for 132 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who died between 2011 and 2014...
January 1, 2017: American Journal of Hospice & Palliative Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28099053/palliative-care-involvement-is-associated-with-less-intensive-end-of-life-care-in-adolescent-and-young-adult-oncology-patients
#6
Jennifer M Snaman, Erica C Kaye, Jessie J Lu, April Sykes, Justin N Baker
BACKGROUND: Adolescent and young adult oncology (AYAO) patients often receive intensive medical care and experience significant symptoms at the end of life (EOL). OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to describe the characteristics of AYAO patients aged 15-26 years who died as inpatients in a hospital and to compare the illness and EOL experiences of AYAO patients who did and did not receive palliative care (PC). DESIGN AND SETTING: A standardized data extraction tool was used to collect information about demographics, treatment, terminal characteristics, and symptoms during the last month of life (LMOL) for 69 AYAO patients who died while hospitalized between 2008 and 2014...
January 18, 2017: Journal of Palliative Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28098622/physician-assisted-suicide-and-euthanasia-in-the-icu-a-dialogue-on-core-ethical-issues
#7
Ewan C Goligher, E Wesley Ely, Daniel P Sulmasy, Jan Bakker, John Raphael, Angelo E Volandes, Bhavesh M Patel, Kate Payne, Annmarie Hosie, Larry Churchill, Douglas B White, James Downar
OBJECTIVE: Many patients are admitted to the ICU at or near the end of their lives. Consequently, the increasingly common debate regarding physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia holds implications for the practice of critical care medicine. The objective of this article is to explore core ethical issues related to physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia from the perspective of healthcare professionals and ethicists on both sides of the debate. SYNTHESIS: We identified four issues highlighting the key areas of ethical tension central to evaluating physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia in medical practice: 1) the benefit or harm of death itself, 2) the relationship between physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia and withholding or withdrawing life support, 3) the morality of a physician deliberately causing death, and 4) the management of conscientious objection related to physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia in the critical care setting...
February 2017: Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28097432/attitudes-of-palliative-home-care-physicians-towards-palliative-sedation-at-home-in-italy
#8
Sebastiano Mercadante, Francesco Masedu, Alessandro Mercadante, Franco Marinangeli, Federica Aielli
BACKGROUND: Information about the attitudes towards palliative sedation (PS) at home is limited. AIM: The aim of this survey was to assess the attitudes of palliative care physicians in Italy regarding PS at home. DESIGN: A questionnaire was submitted to a sample of palliative care physicians, asking information about their activity and attitudes towards PS at home. SETTING: This is a survey of home care physicians in Italy who were involved in end-of-life care decisions at home...
January 17, 2017: Supportive Care in Cancer: Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28096704/neonatal-resuscitation-advances-in-training-and-practice
#9
REVIEW
Taylor Sawyer, Rachel A Umoren, Megan M Gray
Each year in the US, some four hundred thousand newborns need help breathing when they are born. Due to the frequent need for resuscitation at birth, it is vital to have evidence-based care guidelines and to provide effective neonatal resuscitation training. Every five years, the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) reviews the science of neonatal resuscitation. In the US, the American Heart Association (AHA) develops treatment guidelines based on the ILCOR science review, and the Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP) translates the AHA guidelines into an educational curriculum...
2017: Advances in Medical Education and Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28096009/perceptions-of-dying-well-and-distressing-death-by-acute-care-nurses
#10
Christine A Becker, Greg Wright, Kristen Schmit
AIM: This study aims to identify perceptions of nurses practicing in four adult inpatient units regarding their actions to provide quality end of life care for dying patients, their definitions of dying well, and their symptoms of distress and actions they took for relief. BACKGROUND: Nurses caring for patients who are dying want them to have the best death possible; however, many nurses are not prepared for every death which may occur. METHODS: Qualitative questionnaire data were collected from 49 nurses on four adult inpatient nursing units to analyze nurse perceptions of distressing death and dying well...
February 2017: Applied Nursing Research: ANR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28095941/preparation-for-the-end-of-life-and-life-completion-during-late-stage-lung-cancer-an-exploratory-analysis
#11
Gail Adorno, Cara Wallace
OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to explore preparation for the end of life (EoL) and life closure among persons with advanced metastatic lung cancer. Understanding quality of life through the lens of preparation and completion is important since the trajectory of lung cancer can be relatively short, often leading to application of cancer-directed therapies near death without the opportunity for advance planning or palliative care. Clinical research is needed to understand the kinds of distress specific to older adults with advanced lung cancer that are amendable to palliative care interventions...
January 18, 2017: Palliative & Supportive Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28095906/cost-of-physician-led-home-visit-care-zaitaku-care-compared-with-hospital-care-at-the-end-of-life-in-japan
#12
Kentaro Kinjo, Tomoko Sairenji, Hidenobu Koga, Yasuhiro Osugi, Shin Yoshida, Hidefumi Ichinose, Yasunori Nagai, Hiroshi Imura, Jeannette E South-Paul, Mark Meyer, Yoshihisa Honda
BACKGROUND: Physician-led home visit care with medical teams (Zaitaku care) has been developed on a national scale to support those who wish to stay at home at the end of life, and promote a system of community-based integrated care in Japan. Medical care at the end of life can be expensive, and is an urgent socioeconomic issue for aging societies. However medical costs of physician-led home visits care have not been well studied. We compared the medical costs of Zaitaku care and hospital care at the end of life in a rapidly aging community in a rural area in Japan...
January 17, 2017: BMC Health Services Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28095838/communication-with-families-regarding-organ-and-tissue-donation-after-death-in-intensive-care-comfort-protocol-for-an-intervention-study
#13
Julie E Potter, Robert G Herkes, Lin Perry, Rosalind M Elliott, Anders Aneman, Jorge L Brieva, Elena Cavazzoni, Andrew T H Cheng, Michael J O'Leary, Ian M Seppelt, Val Gebski
BACKGROUND: Discussing deceased organ donation can be difficult not only for families but for health professionals who initiate and manage the conversations. It is well recognised that the methods of communication and communication skills of health professionals are key influences on decisions made by families regarding organ donation. METHODS: This multicentre study is being performed in nine intensive care units with follow-up conducted by the Organ and Tissue Donation Service in New South Wales (NSW) Australia...
January 17, 2017: BMC Health Services Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28095780/effectiveness-of-medication-review-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis-of-randomized-controlled-trials
#14
Victor Johan Bernard Huiskes, David Marinus Burger, Cornelia Helena Maria van den Ende, Bartholomeus Johannes Fredericus van den Bemt
BACKGROUND: Medication review is often recommended to optimize medication use. In clinical practice it is mostly operationalized as an intervention without co-interventions during a short term intervention period. However, most systematic reviews also included co-interventions and prolonged medication optimization interventions. Furthermore, most systematic reviews focused on specific patient groups (e.g. polypharmacy, elderly, hospitalized) and/or on specific outcome measures (e.g. hospital admissions and mortality)...
January 17, 2017: BMC Family Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28095759/living-with-end-stage-renal-disease
#15
Karen Schipper, Elleke Landeweer, Tineke A Abma
BACKGROUND: Living with a renal disease often reduces quality of life because of the stress it entails. No attention has been paid to the moral challenges of living with renal disease. OBJECTIVES: To explore the moral challenges of living with a renal disease. RESEARCH DESIGN: A case study based on qualitative research. We used Walker's ethical framework combined with narrative ethics to analyse how negotiating care responsibilities lead to a new perspective on moral issues...
January 1, 2017: Nursing Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28094851/blood-transfusion-for-preventing-primary-and-secondary-stroke-in-people-with-sickle-cell-disease
#16
REVIEW
Lise J Estcourt, Patricia M Fortin, Sally Hopewell, Marialena Trivella, Winfred C Wang
BACKGROUND: Sickle cell disease is one of the commonest severe monogenic disorders in the world, due to the inheritance of two abnormal haemoglobin (beta globin) genes. Sickle cell disease can cause severe pain, significant end-organ damage, pulmonary complications, and premature death. Stroke affects around 10% of children with sickle cell anaemia (HbSS). Chronic blood transfusions may reduce the risk of vaso-occlusion and stroke by diluting the proportion of sickled cells in the circulation...
January 17, 2017: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28093387/dying-at-home-of-cancer-whose-needs-are-being-met-the-experience-of-family-carers-and-healthcare-professionals-a-multiperspective-qualitative-study
#17
Jackie Pottle, Julia Hiscock, Richard D Neal, Marlise Poolman
OBJECTIVES: Supporting patients to die in the place of their choosing is an important aspect of end of life care. Our study set out to answer the question: 'How does the home environment influence perceptions of quality of death, and the experience of caring for the dying at home, for family carers and healthcare professionals (HCPs)? METHODS: A qualitative approach, using multiperspective interviews with bereaved family carers (n=15) and a nominated HCP (n=13) ensured depth of insight gained into supporting a home death...
January 16, 2017: BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28093312/palliative-medicine-and-preparedness-planning-for-patients-receiving-left-ventricular-assist-device-as-destination-therapy-challenges-to-measuring-impact-and-change-in-institutional-culture
#18
Brandon P Verdoorn, Angela J Luckhardt, Sara E Wordingham, Shannon M Dunlay, Keith M Swetz
CONTEXT: While left ventricular assist devices as destination therapy (DT-LVAD) can improve survival, quality of life, and functional capacity in well-selected patients with advanced heart failure, there remain unique challenges to providing quality end-of-life care in this population. Palliative care involvement is universally recommended, but how to best operationalize this care and measure success is unknown. OBJECTIVES: To characterize the process of preparedness planning (PP) for patients receiving DT-LVAD at our institution and better understand opportunities for quality improvement or procedural transferability...
January 13, 2017: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28092282/neonatal-palliative-care
#19
Elvira Parravicini
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: A significant number of newborns are affected by life-limiting or life-threatening conditions. When prolongation of survival is no longer a goal, or prognosis is uncertain, a plan of care focused on the infant's comfort is essential. The aim of this article is to review the most recent and relevant literature regarding neonatal palliative care (NPC). RECENT FINDINGS: A variety of perinatal and NPC programs are described, but most programs focus exclusively on end-of-life care...
January 13, 2017: Current Opinion in Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28092211/spanish-adaptation-of-the-frommelt-attitude-toward-care-of-the-dying-scale-fatcod-s-in-nursing-undergraduates
#20
Montserrat Edo-Gual, Joaquín Tomás-Sábado, Juana Gómez-Benito, Cristina Monforte-Royo, Amor Aradilla-Herrero
The Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying Scale (FATCOD) is designed to assess the attitudes of professionals and trainees toward caring for the dying patient and their family members. In this study the main aim is to adapt the FATCOD to a Spanish context (FATCOD-S). In addition, the relations between FATCOD-S, sociodemographic variables, emotional intelligence, and death attitudes have been analyzed. A sample of 669 Spanish nursing students from four Universities responded to a questionnaire. The exploratory factor analysis (EFA) concludes a structure composed of two significant factors...
January 1, 2017: Omega
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