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Pediatric point-of-care ultrasound

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28590591/hot-off-the-press-point-of-care-ultrasound-for-non-angulated-distal-forearm-fractures-in-children
#1
Justin Morgenstern, Corey Heitz, William K Milne
This prospective, cross-sectional diagnostic study examined the performance of point of care ultrasound (POCUS) in the diagnosis of suspected non-angulated forearm fractures in pediatric patients aged 4-17 years, using x-rays as the gold standard. The test characteristics reported are a sensitivity of 94.7% (95% CI 89.7-99.8%), a specificity of 93.5% (95% CI 88.6-98.5%), a positive likelihood ratio of 14.6, and a negative likelihood ratio of 0.6. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
June 7, 2017: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28569379/use-and-education-of-point-of-care-ultrasound-in-pediatric-emergency-medicine-in-saudi-arabia
#2
Abdullah Saad Alzayedi, Amani A Azizalrahman, Hamad A AlMadi, Ahmed M Althekair, Michael Blaivas, Dimitrios Karakitsos
OBJECTIVES: Point-of-care ultrasound (US) is an emerging tool used by pediatric emergency physicians in the last decade. Currently in the Middle East, point-of-care US use and education are at an early stage, with no designed curriculum or guidelines for its implementation in pediatric emergency medicine (EM). The objective of this article is to describe the clinical and educational uses of point-of-care US among certified pediatric EM physicians. METHODS: A 19-question survey was sent to all certified pediatric emergency physicians and fellows in pediatric emergency fellowships in Saudi Arabia in February 2016...
June 1, 2017: Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine: Official Journal of the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28509686/accuracy-of-point-of-care-ultrasonography-for-pediatric-ankle-sprain-injuries
#3
Sarah Jones, Keith Colaco, Jason Fischer, Jennifer Stimec, Charisse Kwan, Kathy Boutis
OBJECTIVES: In children with radiograph fracture-negative lateral ankle injuries, the main objective of this pilot study was to explore the accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) performed by a pediatric emergency physician in diagnosing anterior talofibular ligament injuries, radiographically occult distal fibular fractures, and effusions compared with reference standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). METHODS: This was a prospective cohort pilot study...
May 15, 2017: Pediatric Emergency Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28503848/in-response-ultrasound-assisted-lumbar-puncture-on-infants-in-the-pediatric-emergency-department
#4
Samuel H F Lam
I read with interest the recently published article on ultrasound assisted pediatric lumbar puncture (UALP) by Gorn and colleagues(1) . As an advocate of point-of-care ultrasound in the pediatric emergency department setting, I am greatly encouraged by the study results. However, I would suggest clarification on several details of the study, some of which could potentially lead to biased outcomes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
May 15, 2017: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28484942/minimal-training-sufficient-to-diagnose-pediatric-wrist-fractures-with-ultrasound
#5
Henrik Hedelin, Christian Tingström, Hanna Hebelka, Jon Karlsson
BACKGROUND: In children, non-fractured wrists generally need no treatment and those that are fractured may only require a 3-week cast without any clinical follow-up. The ability to perform a point-of-care triage decision if radiographs are needed could improve patient flow and decrease unnecessary radiographs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of ultrasound (US) as a point-of-care triage tool for pediatric wrist injuries with limited training. METHODS: Physicians with no previous US experience attended a 1...
December 2017: Critical Ultrasound Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28484694/developing-a-sustainable-need-based-pediatric-acute-care-training-curriculum-in-solomon-islands
#6
Daniel Ta Yo Yu, Jason T Gillon, Raymond Dickson, Karen A Schneider, Martha W Stevens
BACKGROUND: The Johns Hopkins Hospital Pediatric Emergency Department (PED) was invited to collaborate with the National Referral Hospital (NRH), Solomon Islands, to establish an acute care pediatric education program for the country's inaugural class of national medical graduate trainees. OBJECTIVE: To develop and evaluate a sustainable, need-based post-graduate training curriculum in pediatric acute care, resuscitation, and point-of-care ultrasound. METHODS: A need-based training curriculum was developed utilizing the ADDIE model and was implemented and revised over the course of 2 years and two site visits...
2017: Frontiers in Public Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28471906/utility-of-ultrasound-guidance-for-central-venous-access-in-children
#7
Chen He, Rebecca Vieira, Jennifer R Marin
BACKGROUND: Placement of a central venous catheter (CVC) in a pediatric patient is an important skill for pediatric emergency medicine physicians but can be challenging and time consuming. Ultrasound (US) guidance has been shown to improve success of central line placement in adult patients. OBJECTIVES: This article aims to review the literature and evaluate the benefit of US guidance in the placement of CVCs, specifically in pediatric emergency department patients, and to review the procedure...
May 2017: Pediatric Emergency Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28466618/point-of-care-ultrasound-in-a-department-of-pediatric-and-adolescent-surgery
#8
Efrat Avinadav, Anastasia Almog, Dragan Kravarusic, Emanuelle Seguier, Inbal Samuk, Adrianna Nika, Enrique Freud
BACKGROUND: Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) is becoming a common tool for routine use in emergency medicine, anesthesiology and intensive care for diagnostic and interventional purposes. When a portable ultrasound device became available for the department of Pediatric and Adolescent Surgery at the Schneider's Children Medical Center of Israel, we added POCUS assessments to the physician's daily rounds. POCUS is performed by pediatric surgeons trained in basic ultrasonography skills...
November 2016: Israel Medical Association Journal: IMAJ
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28457766/authors-response-to-commentary-on-point-of-care-lung-ultrasound-of-children-with-acute-asthma-exacerbations-in-the-pediatric-emergency-department
#9
Alexander Sasha Dubrovsky, Patricia Li, Samantha Dankoff, Adam Shapiro, Terry Varshney
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 21, 2017: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28457764/letter-to-the-editor-regarding-recent-american-journal-of-emergency-medicine-article-in-press-point-of-care-lung-ultrasound-of-children-with-acute-asthma-exacerbations-in-the-pediatric-emergency-department-by-dankoff-et-al
#10
Mckenna Longacre, Sigmund Kharasch, Andrew Liteplo
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 21, 2017: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28441243/emergency-point-of-care-ultrasound-diagnosis-of-retained-soft-tissue-foreign-bodies-in-the-pediatric-emergency-department
#11
Terry Varshney, Charisse W Kwan, Jason W Fischer, Alyssa Abo
The presence of a foreign body (FB), its depth and size, is often indeterminate by clinical examination. Conventional imaging such as a radiograph can fail to visualize soft tissue FBs. We present 2 cases where point-of-care ultrasound was used to detect previously unidentified FBs.
June 2017: Pediatric Emergency Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28430713/a-national-survey-of-neonatologists-barriers-and-prerequisites-to-introduce-point-of-care-ultrasound-in-neonatal-icus
#12
Hussnain S Mirza, Gregory Logsdon, Anoop Pulickal, Mark Stephens, Rajan Wadhawan
Point-of-care (POC) ultrasound refers to the use of portable imaging. Although POC ultrasound is widely available to the neonatologists in Australia and Europe, neonatologists in the United States report limited availability. Our objective was to seek the US neonatologists' perception of barriers and prerequisites in adopting POC ultrasound in neonatal intensive care units. An online survey link was sent via e-mail to 3000 neonatologists included in the database maintained by the American Academy of Pediatrics...
April 20, 2017: Ultrasound Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28419618/correspondence-response-to-letter-to-the-editor-ultrasound-assisted-lumbar-puncture-on-infants-in-the-pediatric-emergency-department
#13
Michael Gorn
We would like to thank our reader for his/her interest in our work and continuing support of point-of-care ultrasound in pediatric emergency medicine. Our study was conducted at a large academic emergency department with pediatrics and emergency medicine residents, nurse practitioners who function at or above the level of a senior resident (PGY-3 and 4), and pediatric emergency fellows who function as attending physicians. As a routine, all initial lumbar puncture (LP) attempts are made by learners. This article is protected by copyright...
April 17, 2017: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28379901/the-utility-of-teleultrasound-to-guide-acute-patient-management
#14
Christian Becker, Mario Fusaro, Dhruv Patel, Isaac Shalom, William H Frishman, Corey Scurlock
Ultrasound has evolved into a core bedside tool for diagnostic and management purposes for all subsets of adult and pediatric critically-ill patients. Teleintensive care unit coverage has undergone a similar rapid expansion period throughout the United States. Round-the-clock access to ultrasound equipment is very common in today's intensive care unit, but 24/7 coverage with staff trained to acquire and interpret point-of-care ultrasound in real time is lagging behind equipment availability. Medical trainees and physician extenders require attending level supervision to ensure consistent image acquisition and accurate interpretation...
May 2017: Cardiology in Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28376073/point-of-care-ultrasound-diagnosis-of-traumatic-abdominal-wall-hernia
#15
Lori B Bjork, Shawna D Bellew, Tobias Kummer
Traumatic abdominal wall hernias due to blunt abdominal trauma in pediatric patients can pose a diagnostic challenge because of spontaneous hernia reduction. Ultrasonography may be superior to computed tomography for this indication in some cases because of the ability to dynamically and repeatedly assess the area of injury. Herniation can be induced or exaggerated via Valsalva maneuvers, which can facilitate its detection during dynamic assessment. We present the case of a 3-year-old boy who sustained blunt abdominal trauma, with a resultant abdominal wall hernia that was diagnosed using point-of-care ultrasound imaging...
May 2017: Pediatric Emergency Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28353530/cranium-penetrating-mass-detected-by-ultrasound-expedited-management-of-langerhans-cell-histiocytosis
#16
Brian Morgan, Hsien Lee Lau, Sharon Yellin
A 6-year-old boy presented to the pediatric emergency department with a unilateral 5 × 3-cm superficial mass on the postauricular region growing for 1 month. Point-of-care ultrasound was used to evaluate the mass, which revealed a complex cystic mass penetrating the temporal bone. After confirmatory magnetic resonance imaging, the patient was transferred for neurosurgical evaluation, and the tumor was excised. Pathology revealed Langerhans cell histiocytosis.
April 2017: Pediatric Emergency Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28353529/an-infant-diagnosed-with-hydrocephalus-by-point-of-care-ultrasound
#17
Susan K Yaeger, Jennifer R Marin
Point-of-care ultrasound has become a valuable tool for pediatric emergency physicians, with an increasing number of indications being described. In this case presentation, we demonstrate the use of point-of-care ultrasound in the pediatric emergency department to diagnose ventriculomegaly in an infant presenting with a seizure.
April 2017: Pediatric Emergency Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28336237/point-of-care-ultrasound-sonographic-posterior-fat-pad-sign-a%C3%A2-case-report-and-brief-literature-review
#18
Yoshito Okumura, Nestor Maldonado, Kyle Lennon, Bryan McCarty, Philipp Underwood, Mathew Nelson
BACKGROUND: Diagnosis of elbow fracture can sometimes be difficult with plain radiography due to overlapping bones, growth plates, and maturing bones in the pediatric population. The radiographic posterior fat pad (PFP) sign is one of the frequently referenced indirect signs of an occult elbow fracture. This sign can be falsely negative if the sign is subtle, and can be falsely positive when the position of the elbow is not flexed at 90 degrees. CASE REPORT: We discuss a case in which sonographic PFP sign helped to diagnose an elbow fracture...
March 20, 2017: Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28284770/point-of-care-ultrasonography-to-assist-in-the-diagnosis-and-management-of-subluxation-of-the-radial-head-in-pediatric-patients-a-case-series
#19
Faruk Güngör, Taylan Kılıç
BACKGROUND: A subluxation of the radial head (SRH) is a clinical condition that commonly occurs in children under 6 years of age. History and physical examination findings typically include a child who presents with an elbow held in extension and with forearm pronation, after having suffered significant longitudinal traction on the arm, or after a fall on an outstretched hand. The diagnosis is often clinically obvious. The injury responds dramatically to closed reduction, and usually no imaging is required...
March 8, 2017: Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28258593/hypertrophic-cardiomyopathy-in-youth-athletes-successful-screening-with-point-of-care-ultrasound-by-medical-students
#20
J Christian Fox, Shadi Lahham, Graciela Maldonado, Suzi Klaus, Bassil Aish, Lauren V Sylwanowicz, Justin Yanuck, Sean P Wilson, Mason Shieh, Craig L Anderson, Carter English, Ryan Mayer, Uthara R Mohan
OBJECTIVES: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a life-threatening genetic cardiovascular disease that often goes undetected in young athletes. Neither history nor physical examination are reliable to identify those at risk. The objective of this study is to determine whether minimally trained medical student volunteers can use ultrasound to screen for HCM. METHODS: This was a prospective enrollment of young athletes performed at 12 area high schools and three area colleges, between May 2012 and August 2013...
June 2017: Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine: Official Journal of the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine
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