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Exercise Associated Hyponatremia

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27747851/sodium-intake-during-an-ultramarathon-does-not-prevent-muscle-cramping-dehydration-hyponatremia-or-nausea
#1
Martin D Hoffman, Kristin J Stuempfle, Taylor Valentino
BACKGROUND: Ultramarathon runners commonly believe that sodium replacement is important for prevention of muscle cramping, dehydration, hyponatremia, and nausea during prolonged continuous exercise. The purpose of this study was to measure total sodium intake to determine if these beliefs are supported. METHODS: Participants of a 161-km ultramarathon (air temperature reaching 39 °C) provided full dietary information during the race, underwent body weight measurements before and after the race, completed a post-race questionnaire about muscle cramping and nausea or vomiting during the race, and had post-race plasma sodium concentration measured...
December 2015: Sports Medicine—Open
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27721832/management-of-severe-rhabdomyolysis-and-exercise-associated-hyponatremia-in-a-female-with-anorexia-nervosa-and-excessive-compulsive-exercising
#2
Marwan El Ghoch, Simona Calugi, Riccardo Dalle Grave
This case report describes the management of a 49-year-old female with restricting-type anorexia nervosa and excessive compulsive exercising associated with rhabdomyolysis, high levels of serum creatine kinase (CK) (3,238 U/L), and marked hyponatremia (Na(+): 123 mEq/L) in the absence of purging behaviours or psychogenic polydipsia; it is the first case report to describe exercise-associated hyponatremia in a patient with anorexia nervosa. The patient, who presented with a body mass index (BMI) of 13.4 kg/m(2), was successfully treated by means of an adapted inpatient version of an enhanced form of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT-E)...
2016: Case Reports in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27714955/restricting-dietary-sodium-reduces-plasma-sodium-response-to-exercise-in-the-heat
#3
E E Koenders, C P G Franken, J D Cotter, S N Thornton, N J Rehrer
Exercise-associated hyponatremia can be life-threatening. Excessive hypotonic fluid ingestion is the primary etiological factor but does not explain all variability. Possible effects of chronic sodium intake are unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether dietary sodium affects plasma sodium concentration [Na(+) ] during exercise in the heat, when water intake nearly matches mass loss. Endurance-trained men (n = 9) participated in this crossover experiment. Each followed a low-sodium (lowNa) or high-sodium (highNa) diet for 9 days with 24-h fluid intakes and urine outputs measured before experimental trials (day 10)...
October 7, 2016: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27548748/are-we-being-drowned-by-overhydration-advice-on-the-internet
#4
Martin D Hoffman, Theodore L Bross, R Tyler Hamilton
OBJECTIVE: Because inappropriate recommendations about hydration during exercise appear widespread and potentially dangerous, we assessed the quality of a sampling of information currently available to the public on the Internet. METHODS: Internet searches using the Google search engine were conducted using the terms "hydration," "hydration guidelines," "drinking fluids" and "drinking guidelines" combined with "and exercise." From the first 50 websites for each search phrase, duplicates were removed yielding 141 unique websites that were categorized by source and examined for specific hydration related information and recommendations...
August 22, 2016: Physician and Sportsmedicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27536693/current-challenges-in-the-evaluation-and-management-of-hyponatremia
#5
REVIEW
Kerri McGreal, Pooja Budhiraja, Nishank Jain, Alan S L Yu
BACKGROUND: Hyponatremia is a common electrolyte imbalance that clinicians face on a regular basis. SUMMARY: This review aims to discuss four current challenges that can arise when diagnosing and treating hyponatremia: low solute intake, heart failure, exercise-associated hyponatremia, and mild chronic hyponatremia. Low solute intake in a person who already has a urinary concentrating defect will lead to increased retention of free water. The free water retention will cause or worsen hyponatremia that is already present...
June 2016: Kidney Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26972268/exercise-associated-collapse-is-hyponatremia-in-our-head
#6
REVIEW
Brian J Krabak, Kelsey M Parker, Anthony DiGirolamo
Exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) is one of the most common causes of exercise-associated collapse. The primary pathogenesis of EAH is largely the result of excessive fluid intake but is influenced by other factors, including hormonal abnormalities (ie, inappropriate arginine vasopressin secretion), renal abnormalities, and mobilization of sodium stores. Early recognition of EAH is crucial to appropriate treatment, because symptoms are varied and may be confused with other causes of exercise-associated collapse...
March 2016: PM & R: the Journal of Injury, Function, and Rehabilitation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26747653/proof-of-concept-hypovolemic-hyponatremia-may-precede-and-augment-creatine-kinase-elevations-during-an-ultramarathon
#7
Ross S Cairns, Tamara Hew-Butler
PURPOSE: It is not known if exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) is a cause or consequence of exertional rhabdomyolysis (ER).We hypothesized that osmotic stress (EAH) coupled with mechanical stress (running) potentiated muscle cell breakdown (ER). This concept would be supported if a nadir in serum sodium concentration ([Na(+)]) temporally preceded peak creatine kinase levels (CK) during an ultramarathon run. METHODS: Fifteen participants ran ≥104 km and had blood drawn: prior to start; 53; 104 km; and 24-h post run...
March 2016: European Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26709371/sodium-intake-during-an-ultramarathon-does-not-prevent-muscle-cramping-dehydration-hyponatremia-or-nausea
#8
Martin D Hoffman, Kristin J Stuempfle, Taylor Valentino
BACKGROUND: Ultramarathon runners commonly believe that sodium replacement is important for prevention of muscle cramping, dehydration, hyponatremia, and nausea during prolonged continuous exercise. The purpose of this study was to measure total sodium intake to determine if these beliefs are supported. METHODS: Participants of a 161-km ultramarathon (air temperature reaching 39 °C) provided full dietary information during the race, underwent body weight measurements before and after the race, completed a post-race questionnaire about muscle cramping and nausea or vomiting during the race, and had post-race plasma sodium concentration measured...
2015: Sports Medicine—Open
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26679208/in-response-to-incidence-of-exercise-associated-hyponatremia-and-its-association-with-nonosmotic-stimuli-of-arginine-vasopressin-in-the-gnw100s-ultraendurance-marathon
#9
LETTER
Martin D Hoffman, Jeremy Joslin, Ian R Rogers
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2016: Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine: Official Journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26661748/sweat-sodium-loss-influences-serum-sodium-concentration-in-a-marathon
#10
B Lara, J J Salinero, F Areces, D Ruiz-Vicente, C Gallo-Salazar, J Abián-Vicén, J Del Coso
The aim of this investigation was to determine the influence of sweat electrolyte concentration on body water and electrolyte homeostasis during a marathon. Fifty-one runners completed a marathon race in a warm and dry environment (24.4 ± 3.6 °C). Runners were classified as low-salt sweaters (n = 21; <30 mmol/L of sweat Na(+) concentration), typical sweaters (n = 20; ≥30 and <60 mmol/L of sweat Na(+) concentration), and salty sweaters (n = 10; ≥60 mmol/L of sweat Na(+) concentration)...
December 13, 2015: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26600233/fatal-hyponatremic-encephalopathy-as-a-result-of-child-abuse-from-forced-exercise
#11
Michael L Moritz, James R Lauridson
We report a case of fatal hyponatremic encephalopathy in a child who was forced to exercise as a form of punishment. A 9-year-old girl with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder was forced to run repeated 50-ft sprints to the point of exhaustion by her grandmother as punishment for taking candy from a classmate. After more than 3 hours of forced running, the child collapsed, began to vomit, and had repeated clonic seizures. Upon presentation to the emergency department, she was nonresponsive with a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 11 and had noncardiogenic pulmonary edema with serum sodium of 117 mEq/L...
March 2016: American Journal of Forensic Medicine and Pathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26565425/exertional-heat-stroke-and-susceptibility-to-malignant-hyperthermia-in-an-athlete-evidence-for-a-link
#12
Mathias Poussel, Philippe Guerci, Pierre Kaminsky, Marie Heymonet, Nathalie Roux-Buisson, Julien Faure, Emilien Fronzaroli, Bruno Chenuel
OBJECTIVE: To describe the possible association (pathophysiologic and clinical features) between exertional heat stroke (EHS) and malignant hyperthermia (MH). BACKGROUND: Both EHS and MH are acute and life-threatening disorders. It has repeatedly been shown that EHS can occur in well-trained patients with known MH-associated mutation in the RYR1 gene in the absence of any extreme environmental conditions or extreme physical activity, thereby supporting a possible link between EHS and MH...
November 2015: Journal of Athletic Training
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26270309/kenney-et-al-respond
#13
COMMENT
Erica L Kenney, Michael W Long, Angie L Cradock, Steven L Gortmaker
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2015: American Journal of Public Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26229538/exercise-induced-pulmonary-edema-in-a-triathlon
#14
Hirotomo Yamanashi, Jun Koyamatsu, Masaharu Nobuyoshi, Kunihiko Murase, Takahiro Maeda
Introduction. Family physicians have more opportunities to attend athletic competitions as medical staff at first-aid centers because of the increasing popularity of endurance sports. Case. A 38-year-old man who participated in a triathlon race experienced difficulty in breathing after swimming and was moved to a first-aid center. His initial oxygen saturation was 82% and a thoracic computed tomography scan showed bilateral ground glass opacity in the peripheral lungs. His diagnosis was noncardiogenic pulmonary edema associated with exercise or swimming: exercise-induced pulmonary edema (EIPE) or swimming-induced pulmonary edema (SIPE)...
2015: Case Reports in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26227507/statement-of-the-3rd-international-exercise-associated-hyponatremia-consensus-development-conference-carlsbad-california-2015
#15
Tamara Hew-Butler, Mitchell H Rosner, Sandra Fowkes-Godek, Jonathan P Dugas, Martin D Hoffman, Douglas P Lewis, Ronald J Maughan, Kevin C Miller, Scott J Montain, Nancy J Rehrer, William O Roberts, Ian R Rogers, Arthur J Siegel, Kristin J Stuempfle, James M Winger, Joseph G Verbalis
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 2015: British Journal of Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26113805/rhabdomyolysis-and-exercise-associated-hyponatremia-in-ultra-bikers-and-ultra-runners
#16
Daniela Chlíbková, Beat Knechtle, Thomas Rosemann, Ivana Tomášková, Jan Novotný, Alena Žákovská, Tomáš Uher
BACKGROUND: Exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH), rhabdomyolysis and renal failure appear to be a unique problem in ultra-endurance racers. METHODS: We investigated the combined occurrence of EAH and rhabdomyolysis in seven different ultra-endurance races and disciplines (i.e. multi-stage mountain biking, 24-h mountain biking, 24-h ultra-running and 100-km ultra-running). RESULTS: Two (15.4%) ultra-runners (man and woman) from hyponatremic ultra-athletes (n = 13) and four (4%) ultra-runners (four men) from the normonatremic group (n = 100) showed rhabdomyolysis following elevated blood creatine kinase (CK) levels > 10,000 U/L without the development of renal failure and the necessity of a medical treatment...
2015: Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26102445/statement-of-the-third-international-exercise-associated-hyponatremia-consensus-development-conference-carlsbad-california-2015
#17
Tamara Hew-Butler, Mitchell H Rosner, Sandra Fowkes-Godek, Jonathan P Dugas, Martin D Hoffman, Douglas P Lewis, Ronald J Maughan, Kevin C Miller, Scott J Montain, Nancy J Rehrer, William O Roberts, Ian R Rogers, Arthur J Siegel, Kristin J Stuempfle, James M Winger, Joseph G Verbalis
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 2015: Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine: Official Journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26102444/preventing-deaths-due-to-exercise-associated-hyponatremia-the-2015-consensus-guidelines
#18
EDITORIAL
Mitchell H Rosner
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 2015: Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine: Official Journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26061675/case-study-symptomatic-exercise-associated-hyponatremia-in-an-endurance-runner-despite-sodium-supplementation
#19
Martin D Hoffman, Thomas M Myers
Symptomatic exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) is known to be a potential complication from overhydration during exercise, but there remains a general belief that sodium supplementation will prevent EAH. We present a case in which a runner with a prior history of EAH consulted a sports nutritionist who advised him to consume considerable supplemental sodium, which did not prevent him from developing symptomatic EAH during a subsequent long run. Emergency medical services were requested for this runner shortly after he finished a 17-hr, 72-km run and hike in Grand Canyon National Park during which he reported having consumed 9...
December 2015: International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25935312/hiker-fatality-from-severe-hyponatremia-in-grand-canyon-national-park
#20
Thomas M Myers, Martin D Hoffman
We present the case of a hiker who died of severe hyponatremia at Grand Canyon National Park. The woman collapsed on the rim shortly after finishing a 5-hour hike into the Canyon during which she was reported to have consumed large quantities of water. First responders transported her to the nearest hospital. En route, she became unresponsive, and subsequent treatment included intravenous normal saline. Imaging and laboratory data at the hospital confirmed hypervolemic hyponatremia with encephalopathy. She never regained consciousness and died of severe cerebral edema less than 24 hours later...
September 2015: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
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