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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28548545/mild-chronic-obstructive-pulmonary-disease-why-spirometry-is-not-sufficient
#1
Amany F Elbehairy, Grace Parraga, Katherine A Webb, J Alberto Neder, Denis E O'Donnell
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) - an inflammatory disease of the airways, alveoli and lung microvasculature - is a leading cause of death worldwide. Smokers with milder airway obstruction constitute the majority of patients with this disease. Many studies have shown increased morbidity, activity-related dyspnea, exercise intolerance and mortality in such patients, compared with age-matched healthy populations. Clinical evaluation of symptomatic smokers with ostensibly mild airway obstruction poses a challenge in clinical practice as spirometry can obscure extensive heterogeneous pathophysiological impairment...
July 2017: Expert Review of Respiratory Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28368706/resting-physiological-correlates-of-reduced-exercise-capacity-in-smokers-with-mild-airway-obstruction
#2
Amany F Elbehairy, Azmy Faisal, Jordan A Guenette, Dennis Jensen, Katherine A Webb, Rashid Ahmed, J Alberto Neder, Denis E O'Donnell
Smokers with minor spirometric abnormalities can experience persistent activity-related dyspnea and exercise intolerance. Additional resting tests can expose heterogeneous physiological abnormalities, but their relevance and association with clinical outcomes remain uncertain. Subjects included sixty-two smokers (≥20 pack-years), with cough and/or dyspnea and minor airway obstruction [forced expiratory volume in one-second (FEV1) ≥80% predicted and >5th percentile lower limit of normal (LLN) (i.e., z-score >-1...
April 3, 2017: COPD
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28345959/ventilatory-inefficiency-and-exertional-dyspnea-in-early-chronic-obstructive-pulmonary-disease
#3
J Alberto Neder, Danilo C Berton, Paulo de Tarso Müller, Amany F Elbehairy, Alcides Rocha, Paolo Palange, Denis E O'Donnell
Exertional dyspnea is present across the spectrum of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) severity. However, without realizing it themselves, patients may decrease daily physical activity to avoid distressing respiratory sensations. Dyspnea also may be associated with deconditioning. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing can uncover exertional dyspnea and its physiological determinants in patients with preserved or only mildly-reduced FEV1. Dyspnea in mild COPD can largely be explained by increased "wasted" ventilation in the physiological dead space which heightens the drive to breathe and worsens the inspiratory mechanical constraints...
March 27, 2017: Annals of the American Thoracic Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/21791741/pediatric-rehabilitation-nursing-education-and-certification
#4
Cynthia G Cortes
Pediatric rehabilitation nurses specialize in providing care and services to children and adolescents with disabilities. Although few formal education experiences exist, there are a myriad of opportunities to gain the knowledge, skills, and expertise to provide the care that yields the most benefit to this population. Certification recognizes the nurse's proficiency and excellence in a specialty practice area. Examples of certification options for pediatric rehabilitation nurses include Certified Rehabilitation Registered Nurse (CRRN), Registered Nurse Certification in Developmental Disabilities (CDDN), Certified Pediatric Nurse (CPN), Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS), and Certified Pediatric Nurse Practitioner (CPNP)...
2008: Journal of Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/12869869/clinical-nurse-specialist-profile-kathleen-l-dunn-ms-rn-crrn-a
#5
Kathleen L Dunn
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 2003: Clinical Nurse Specialist CNS
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/2034882/the-crrn-examination-preparation-and-strategies
#6
L L Pierce, K B Gibbons, J M Cullen
The Certified Rehabilitation Registered Nurse (CRRN) certification has become a visible and coveted credential for the practicing rehabilitation nurse. This article presents practical information about preparing for and taking the CRRN examination. Strategies for implementing a study plan and organizing information to increase retention are suggested. In addition, this article offers recommendations for decreasing test anxiety and increasing confidence in test taking.
May 1991: Rehabilitation Nursing: the Official Journal of the Association of Rehabilitation Nurses
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