Read by QxMD icon Read

Mitochondria, parkinson's disease

Xi-Xun DU, Kang Qin, Qian Jiao, Jun-Xia Xie, Hong Jiang
ATP-sensitive potassium channels (KATP), as an inward rectifying potassium channel, are widely distributed in many types of tissues. KATP are activated by the depletion of ATP level and the increase in oxidative stress in cells. The activity of KATP couples cell metabolism with electrical activity and results in membrane hyperpolarization. KATP are ubiquitously distributed in the brain, including substantia nigra, hippocampus, hypothalamus, cerebral cortex, dorsal nucleus of vagus and glial cells, and participate in neuronal excitability, mitochondria homeostasis and neurotransmitter release...
October 25, 2016: Sheng Li Xue Bao: [Acta Physiologica Sinica]
Timothy M Brenza, Shivani Ghaisas, Julia E Vela Ramirez, Dilshan Harischandra, Vellareddy Anantharam, Balaraman Kalyanaraman, Anumantha G Kanthasamy, Balaji Narasimhan
A progressive loss of neuronal structure and function is a signature of many neurodegenerative conditions including chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Parkinson's, Huntington's and Alzheimer's diseases. Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative and nitrative stress have been implicated as key pathological mechanisms underlying the neurodegenerative processes. However, current therapeutic approaches targeting oxidative damage are ineffective in preventing the progression of neurodegeneration. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidants were recently shown to alleviate oxidative damage...
October 19, 2016: Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology, and Medicine
Kelly L Stauch, Lance M Villeneuve, Phillip R Purnell, Sanjit Pandey, Chittibabu Guda, Howard S Fox
This article reports changes in the striatal non-synaptic mitochondrial proteome of DJ-1, Parkin, and PINK1 knockout (KO) rats at 3 months of age. DJ-1, Parkin, and PINK1 mutations cause autosomal-recessive parkinsonism. It is thought that loss of function of these proteins contributes to the onset and pathogenesis of Parkinson׳s disease (PD). As DJ-1, Parkin, and PINK1 have functions in the regulation of mitochondria, the dataset generated here highlights protein expression changes, which can be helpful for understanding pathological mitochondrial alterations...
December 2016: Data in Brief
Danya Ben-Hail, Racheli Begas-Shvartz, Moran Shalev, Anna Shteinfer-Kuzmine, Arie Gruzman, Simona Reina, Vito De Pinto, Varda Shoshan-Barmatz
Apoptosis is thought to play a critical role in several pathological processes, such as neurodegenerative diseases (i.e., Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases) and various cardiovascular diseases. Despite the fact that apoptotic mechanisms are well defined, there is still no substantial therapeutic strategy to stop or even slow this process. Thus, there is an unmet need for therapeutic agents that are able to block or slow apoptosis in neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. The outer mitochondrial membrane protein voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) is a convergence point for a variety of cell survival and death signals, including apoptosis...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Biological Chemistry
Zhou Ou, Teng Jiang, Qing Gao, You-Yong Tian, Jun-Shan Zhou, Liang Wu, Jian-Quan Shi, Ying-Dong Zhang
INTRODUCTION: We recently demonstrated that angiotensin II (Ang II) was involved in the etiology of Parkinson's disease (PD) via induction of apoptosis of dopaminergic neurons, but the mechanisms are not completely elucidated. Here, we asked whether mitochondrial-dependent mechanisms contributed to the Ang II-induced dopaminergic neuronal apoptosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: CATH.a cells were incubated with Ang II in combination with mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) inhibitors or angiotensin receptor antagonists, and apoptosis rate, caspase-3 activity, cytochrome c levels, and mPTP opening were assessed...
October 2016: Journal of the Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone System: JRAAS
Marthe H R Ludtmann, Plamena R Angelova, Natalia N Ninkina, Sonia Gandhi, Vladimir L Buchman, Andrey Y Abramov
: Misfolded α-synuclein is a key factor in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, knowledge about a physiological role for the native, unfolded α-synuclein is limited. Using brains of mice lacking α-, β-, and γ-synuclein, we report that extracellular monomeric α-synuclein enters neurons and localizes to mitochondria, interacts with ATP synthase subunit α, and modulates ATP synthase function. Using a combination of biochemical, live-cell imaging and mitochondrial respiration analysis, we found that brain mitochondria of α-, β-, and γ-synuclein knock-out mice are uncoupled, as characterized by increased mitochondrial respiration and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
M Rodríguez-Arribas, S M S Yakhine-Diop, J M Bravo-San Pedro, P Gómez-Suaga, R Gómez-Sánchez, G Martínez-Chacón, J M Fuentes, R A González-Polo, M Niso-Santano
Mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs) are structures that regulate physiological functions between endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria in order to maintain calcium signaling and mitochondrial biogenesis. Several proteins located in MAMs, including those encoded by PARK genes and some of neurodegeneration-related proteins (huntingtin, presenilin, etc.), ensure this regulation. In this regard, MAM alteration is associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's (PD), Alzheimer's (AD), and Huntington's diseases (HD) and contributes to the appearance of the pathogenesis features, i...
October 6, 2016: Molecular Neurobiology
Patricia Villacé, Rosa M Mella, Meritxell Roura-Ferrer, María Valcárcel, Clarisa Salado, Amaia Castilla, Danel Kortazar
Parkinson disease (PD) is a prevalent neurodegenerative disease characterized by selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, causing tremor and motor impairment. Parkin protein, whose mutants are the cause of Parkinson disease type 2 (PARK2), has been mechanistically linked to the regulation of apoptosis and the turnover of damaged mitochondria. Several studies have implicated aberrant mitochondria as a key contributor to the development of PD. In the attempt to discover new drugs, high-content cell-based assays are becoming more important to mimic the nature of biological processes and their diversifications in diseases and will be essential for lead identification and the optimization of therapeutic candidates...
October 4, 2016: Journal of Biomolecular Screening
Giuseppe Arena, Enza Maria Valente
The gene PINK1 [phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN)-induced putative kinase 1] encodes a serine/threonine kinase which was initially linked to the pathogenesis of a familial form of Parkinson's disease. Research on PINK1 has recently unravelled that its multiple functions extend well beyond neuroprotection, implicating this eclectic protein in a growing number of human pathologies, including cancer, diabetes, cardiopulmonary dysfunctions and inflammation. Extensive studies have identified PINK1 as a crucial player in the mitochondrial quality control pathway, required to label damaged mitochondria and promote their elimination through an autophagic process (mitophagy)...
October 4, 2016: Journal of Pathology
Randy Hunter, Uttam Ojha, Sunil Bhurtel, Guoying Bing, Dong-Young Choi
Accumulating evidence suggests that chronic inflammation plays a role in the progressive dopaminergic neurodegeneration that occurs in Parkinson's disease. It has been hypothesized that inflammation mediates neuronal damage via exacerbation of a vicious cycle of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. The bacterial endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), induces microglial activation and inflammation driven dopaminergic neurodegeneration. In order to test the hypothesis that LPS-induced inflammatory response might damage mitochondrial structure and function leading to nigral dopaminergic neuron loss, we injected LPS or saline into the striatum of rats...
September 22, 2016: Neuroscience Research
Sara D Reis, Brígida R Pinho, Jorge M A Oliveira
Polyglutamine expansion mutations in specific proteins underlie the pathogenesis of a group of progressive neurodegenerative disorders, including Huntington's disease, spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy, and several spinocerebellar ataxias. The different mutant proteins share ubiquitous expression and abnormal proteostasis, with misfolding and aggregation, but nevertheless evoke distinct patterns of neurodegeneration. This highlights the relevance of the full protein context where the polyglutamine expansion occurs and suggests different interactions with the cellular proteostasis machinery...
September 22, 2016: Molecular Neurobiology
Caio M Massari, Adalberto A Castro, Tharine Dal-Cim, Débora Lanznaster, Carla I Tasca
Parkinson's disease (PD) involves the loss of striatal dopaminergic neurons, although other neurotransmitters and brain areas are also involved in its pathophysiology. In rodent models to PD it has been shown statins improve cognitive and motor deficits and attenuate inflammatory responses evoked by PD-related toxins. Statins are the drugs most prescribed to hypercholesterolemia, but neuroprotective effects have also been attributed to statins treatment in humans and in animal models. This study aimed to establish an in vitro model of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced toxicity, used as an initial screening test to identify effective drugs against neural degeneration related to PD...
December 2016: Toxicology in Vitro: An International Journal Published in Association with BIBRA
Laura Smit-Rigter, Rajeev Rajendran, Catia A P Silva, Liselot Spierenburg, Femke Groeneweg, Emma M Ruimschotel, Danielle van Versendaal, Chris van der Togt, Ulf T Eysel, J Alexander Heimel, Christian Lohmann, Christiaan N Levelt
Mitochondria buffer intracellular Ca(2+) and provide energy [1]. Because synaptic structures with high Ca(2+) buffering [2-4] or energy demand [5] are often localized far away from the soma, mitochondria are actively transported to these sites [6-11]. Also, the removal and degradation of mitochondria are tightly regulated [9, 12, 13], because dysfunctional mitochondria are a source of reactive oxygen species, which can damage the cell [14]. Deficits in mitochondrial trafficking have been proposed to contribute to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, optic atrophy, and Alzheimer's disease [13, 15-19]...
October 10, 2016: Current Biology: CB
Sun Young Chung, Sarah Kishinevsky, Joseph R Mazzulli, John Graziotto, Ana Mrejeru, Eugene V Mosharov, Lesly Puspita, Parvin Valiulahi, David Sulzer, Teresa A Milner, Tony Taldone, Dimitri Krainc, Lorenz Studer, Jae-Won Shim
Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the selective loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra; however, the mechanism of neurodegeneration in PD remains unclear. A subset of familial PD is linked to mutations in PARK2 and PINK1, which lead to dysfunctional mitochondria-related proteins Parkin and PINK1, suggesting that pathways implicated in these monogenic forms could play a more general role in PD. We demonstrate that the identification of disease-related phenotypes in PD-patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived midbrain dopamine (mDA) neurons depends on the type of differentiation protocol utilized...
October 11, 2016: Stem Cell Reports
Chi-Jing Choong, Hideki Mochizuki
Parkinson's disease (PD) presents a relative selective localization of pathology to substantia nigra and well-defined motor symptoms caused by dopaminergic degeneration that makes it an ideal target for gene therapy. Parallel progress in viral vector systems enables the delivery of therapeutic genes directly into brain with reasonable safety along with sustained transgene expression. To date, gene therapy for PD that has reached clinical trial evaluation is mainly based on symptomatic approach that involves enzyme replacement strategy and restorative approach that depends on the addition of neurotrophic factors...
September 16, 2016: Journal of Neural Transmission
Sarah J Annesley, Sui T Lay, Shawn W De Piazza, Oana Sanislav, Eleanor Hammersley, Claire Y Allan, Lisa M Francione, Minh Q Bui, Zhi-Ping Chen, Kevin R W Ngoei, Flora Tassone, Bruce E Kemp, Elsdon Storey, Andrew Evans, Danuta Z Loesch, Paul R Fisher
In combination with studies of post-mortem PD brains, pharmacological and genetic models of Parkinson's Disease (PD) have suggested that two fundamental, interacting cellular processes are impaired - proteostasis and mitochondrial respiration. We have re-examined the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in lymphoblasts isolated from patients with idiopathic PD and an age-matched control group. As previously reported for various PD cell types, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by PD lymphoblasts was significantly elevated...
September 16, 2016: Disease Models & Mechanisms
Aris A Polyzos, Cynthia T McMurray
Mitochondrial dysfunction and ensuing oxidative damage is typically thought to be a primary cause of Huntington's disease, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson disease. There is little doubt that mitochondria (MT) become defective as neurons die, yet whether MT defects are the primary cause or a detrimental consequence of toxicity remains unanswered. Oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and glycolysis provide sensitive and informative measures of the functional status MT and the cells metabolic regulation, yet these measures differ depending on the sample source; species, tissue type, age at measurement, and whether MT are measured in purified form or in a cell...
September 12, 2016: Mechanisms of Ageing and Development
Zhi-Dong Zhou, Wuan-Ting Saw, Eng-King Tan
The coiled-coil-helix-coiled-coil-helix domain (CHCHD)-containing proteins are evolutionarily conserved nucleus-encoded small mitochondrial proteins with important functions. So far, nine members have been identified in this protein family. All CHCHD proteins have at least one functional coiled-coil-helix-coiled-coil-helix (CHCH) domain, which is stabilized by two pairs of disulfide bonds between two helices. CHCHD proteins have various important pathophysiological roles in mitochondria and other key cellular processes...
September 8, 2016: Molecular Neurobiology
A S Baumuratov, P M A Antony, M Ostaszewski, F He, L Salamanca, L Antunes, J Weber, L Longhino, P Derkinderen, W J H Koopman, N J Diederich
Based on autopsy material mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed being part of the pathophysiological cascade of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, in living patients, evidence for such dysfunction is scarce. As the disease presumably starts at the enteric level, we studied ganglionic and mitochondrial morphometrics of enteric neurons. We compared 65 ganglia from 11 PD patients without intestinal symptoms and 41 ganglia from 4 age-matched control subjects. We found that colon ganglia from PD patients had smaller volume, contained significantly more mitochondria per ganglion volume, and displayed a higher total mitochondrial mass relative to controls...
2016: Scientific Reports
Haisong Jiang, Sung-Ung Kang, Shuran Zhang, Senthilkumar Karuppagounder, Jinchong Xu, Yong-Kyu Lee, Bong-Gu Kang, Yunjong Lee, Jianmin Zhang, Olga Pletnikova, Juan C Troncoso, Shelia Pirooznia, Shaida A Andrabi, Valina L Dawson, Ted M Dawson
Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Recent studies have implicated a role for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator protein-1α (PGC-1α) in PD and in animal or cellular models of PD. The role of PGC-1α in the function and survival of substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) dopamine neurons is not clear. Here we find that there are four different PGC-1α isoforms expressed in SH-SY5Y cells, and these four isoforms are expressed across subregions of mouse brain...
July 2016: ENeuro
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"