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Breaking bad news

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28719923/-breaking-bad-news-to-cancer-patients-content-communication-preferences-and-psychological-distress
#1
Claudia Gebhardt, Claudia Gorba, Karin Oechsle, Sigrun Vehling, Uwe Koch, Anja Mehnert
Objectives Breaking bad news can be a very distressing situation for both patients and physicians. Physician communication behavior should therefore match patients' communication preferences. The aim of this study was to characterize the content of bad news from the patients' perspective. Patients' preferences for communication of bad news as well as the fit to communication behavior displayed by physicians were also investigated. Finally, consequences of a mismatch between patients' preferences and physician communication were investigated in relation to psychological distress in patients...
July 2017: Psychotherapie, Psychosomatik, Medizinische Psychologie
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28717767/breaking-bad-news-in-ethnic-settings-perspectives-of-patients-and-families-in-northern-sri-lanka
#2
Chrishanthi Rajasooriyar, Jenny Kelly, Thanikai Sivakumar, Gowcikan Navanesan, Shahini Nadarasa, Madona Hashanthy Sriskandarajah, Sabe Sabesan
PURPOSE: The discussion of a cancer diagnosis and prognosis often is difficult. This study explored the expectations of Tamil-speaking patients with cancer and their families with respect to receiving their cancer diagnosis in northern Sri Lanka. METHODS: This exploratory, descriptive, qualitative study used semistructured interviews. RESULTS: Thematic analysis identified two major themes: communication and information seeking. The findings illustrate a discrepancy between patient preference for direct disclosure of the diagnosis and that of families...
June 2017: Journal of Global Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28717713/breaking-cancer-bad-news-to-patients-with-cancer-a-comprehensive-perspective-of-patients-their-relatives-and-the-public-example-from-a-middle-eastern-country
#3
Jamal Zekri, Syed Mustafa Karim
PURPOSE: Empowering patients with cancer requires that they be continuously informed about their condition. In some Eastern cultures, this concept is often opposed by caregivers. We aim to compare the extent of disclosure desired by actual and presumed patients with cancer and their relatives in our practice. METHODS: Nine questions reflecting possible bad news communication to patients from diagnosis to the end of life were designed to investigate the extent of desired disclosure and were answered by 100 patients (cohort I) and 103 accompanying relatives (cohort II) in an outpatient setting...
October 2016: Journal of Global Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28708355/-undergraduate-training-in-physician-patient-communication
#4
Alexandre Berney, Pascale Pécoud, Céline Bourquin, Friedrich Stiefel
In addition to providing psychiatric care to patients with somatic diseases, liaison psychiatry plays an important role in the teaching of the relational aspects of the clinical encounter between patients and clinicians. This series of three articles proposes a critical reflection on this topic, and presents examples of undergraduate and postgraduate teaching programs developed by the psychiatric liaison service at Lausanne University Hospital. This article describes the general context of undergraduate teaching, and focuses on our training with simulated patient of a breaking bad news situation, taking place during the fourth year of medical studies...
February 8, 2017: Revue Médicale Suisse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28700368/regional-anesthesia-and-analgesia-in-cancer-care-is-it-time-to-break-the-bad-news
#5
Mir W Sekandarzad, André A J van Zundert, Chris W Doornebal, Markus W Hollmann
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: There is ongoing controversy regarding the tumor-protective effects of regional anesthesia in patients undergoing cancer surgery. Evidence of up-to-date systematic reviews will be presented alongside recent updates on the effects of opioids and local anesthetics. RECENT FINDINGS: In recent years, the literature regarding the effects of regional anesthesia techniques on cancer recurrence has raised many unanswered questions. Ongoing randomized controlled trials may not be able to shed light on the controversial discussion regarding the tumor protective effects of regional anesthesia because the expected effect size and event rate in those studies may be overstated...
July 11, 2017: Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28689478/beyond-a-western-bioethics-in-asia-and-its-implication-on-autonomy
#6
Mark Tan Kiak Min
Despite flourishing as a multidisciplinary subject, the predominant view in bioethics today is based on Anglo-American thought. This has serious implications for a global bioethics that needs to be contextualized to local cultures and circumstances in order to be relevant. Being the largest continent on the earth, Asia is home to a variety of cultures, religions and countries of different economic statuses. While the practice of medicine in the East and West may be similar, its ethical practices do differ. Thus, the Western understanding of autonomy may not be wholly applicable in the Asian setting, especially in the setting of breaking bad news, giving consent, determining best interests and deciding on end-of-life care...
July 8, 2017: New Bioethics: a Multidisciplinary Journal of Biotechnology and the Body
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28666771/physicians-psychophysiological-stress-reaction-in-medical-communication-of-bad-news-a-critical-literature-review
#7
REVIEW
Regina Katharina Studer, Brigitta Danuser, Patrick Gomez
INTRODUCTION: Stress is a common phenomenon in medical professions. Breaking bad news (BBN) is reported to be a particularly distressing activity for physicians. Traditionally, the stress experienced by physicians when BBN was assessed exclusively using self-reporting. Only recently, the field of difficult physician-patient communication has used physiological assessments to better understand physicians' stress reactions. METHOD: This paper's goals are to (a) review current knowledge about the physicians' psychophysiological stress reactions in BBN situations, (b) discuss methodological aspects of these studies and (c) suggest directions for future research...
June 27, 2017: International Journal of Psychophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28622011/breaking-bad-news-in-veterinary-medicine
#8
Bonnie McCracken Nickels, Thomas Hugh Feeley
The patient-provider relationship in the context of veterinary medicine represents a unique opportunity for studying how bad news is communicated to pet owners by conducting structured interviews with veterinarians. A sample of 44 veterinarians' responses was recorded and content-analyzed in an effort to identify themes among providers in their clinical experience of breaking bad news (BBN). Two coders revealed several themes in the data that were organized by three overarching areas: (1) breaking bad news in general, (2) euthanasia, and (3) social support...
June 16, 2017: Health Communication
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28619440/breaking-bad-news-a-survey-of-radiology-residents-experiences-communicating-results-to-patients
#9
Anand Narayan, Sergio Dromi, Adam Meeks, Erin Gomez, Bonmyong Lee
PURPOSE: The practice of radiology often includes routine communication of diagnostic test results directly to patients in breast imaging and interventional radiology. There is increasing interest in expanding direct communication throughout radiology. Though these conversations can substantially affect patient well-being, there is limited evidence indicating that radiology residents are specifically taught methods to effectively convey imaging results to patients. Our purpose is to evaluate resident experience communicating imaging results to patients...
April 27, 2017: Current Problems in Diagnostic Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28615002/effect-of-a-simulation-based-workshop-on-breaking-bad-news-for-anesthesiology-residents-an-intervention-study
#10
Vanda Yazbeck Karam, Hanane Barakat, Marie Aouad, Ilene Harris, Yoon Soo Park, Nazih Youssef, John Jack Boulet, Ara Tekian
BACKGROUND: Breaking bad news (BBN) to patients and their relatives is a complex and stressful task. The ideal structure, training methods and assessment instruments best used to teach and assess BBN for anesthesiology residents remain unclear. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of an education intervention for BBN based on immersive experiences with a high fidelity simulator and role-play with standardized patients (SPs). A secondary purpose is to gather validity evidence to support the use of a GRIEV_ING instrument to assess BBN skills...
June 14, 2017: BMC Anesthesiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28607214/breaking-bad-news-perceptions-of-pediatric-residents
#11
M G Geeta, P Krishnakumar
The present study evaluated the perceptions and practice of 92 final year pediatric residents with regard to breaking bad news. Only 16% of residents had received any training in communication skills. Majority (65%) of the residents were not comfortable while breaking bad news.
June 4, 2017: Indian Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28602567/medical-students-reflections-on-emotions-concerning-breaking-bad-news
#12
Asta Kristiina Toivonen, Sari Lindblom-Ylänne, Pekka Louhiala, Eeva Pyörälä
OBJECTIVES: To gain a deeper understanding of fourth year medical students' reflections on emotions in the context of breaking bad news (BBN). METHODS: During the years 2010-2012, students reflected on their emotions concerning BBN in a learning assignment at the end of the communications skills course. The students were asked to write a description of how they felt about a BBN case. The reflections were analysed using qualitative content analysis. RESULTS: 351 students agreed to participate in the study...
June 3, 2017: Patient Education and Counseling
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28566978/satisfaction-with-a-2-day-communication-skills-course-culturally-tailored-for-medical-specialists-in-qatar
#13
Carma L Bylund, Khalid Alyafei, Abdelhamid Afana, Sheyma Al-Romaihi, Mohammed Yassin, Maha Elnashar, Banan Al-Arab, Abdullatif Al-Khal
OBJECTIVE: Health-care communication skills training may be particularly needed in the Arabian Gulf countries because of the variety of cultures within the physician and patient populations. This study describes the implementation and results of a communication skills training program for physicians in Qatar that assessed previous training, and effect of previous training on participants' course evaluations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a 2-day communication skills training course covering seven culturally adapted modules...
May 2017: Journal of Family & Community Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28562739/breaking-bad-news-doctors-skills-in-communicating-with-patients
#14
Francisco José Ferreira da Silveira, Camila Carvalho Botelho, Carolina Cirino Valadão
CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Breaking bad news is one of doctors' duties and it requires them to have some skills, given that this situation is difficult and distressful for patients and their families. Moreover, it is also an uncomfortable condition for doctors. The aim of this study was to evaluate doctors' capacity to break bad news, ascertain which specialties are best prepared for doing this and assess the importance of including this topic within undergraduate courses. DESIGN AND SETTING: Observational cross-sectional quantitative study conducted at a university hospital in Belo Horizonte (MG), Brazil...
May 29, 2017: São Paulo Medical Journal, Revista Paulista de Medicina
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28477398/individual-training-at-the-undergraduate-level-to-promote-competence-in-breaking-bad-news-in-oncology
#15
Alexandre Berney, Valérie Carrard, Marianne Schmid Mast, Raphael Bonvin, Friedrich Stiefel, Céline Bourquin
OBJECTIVE: Training medical students in breaking bad news (BBN) in oncology may be key to improve patient care in an area where many physicians tend to be uncomfortable. Given the lack of evidence in the literature, this study aimed to assess empirically the impact of 2 teaching strategies to prepare students for the task of BBN in oncology: one-to-one simulated patient (SP) training with individual feedback (intervention group) vs small-group SP training with collective feedback (comparison group)...
May 5, 2017: Psycho-oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28448386/barriers-to-goal-concordant-care-for-older-patients-with-acute-surgical-illness-communication-patterns-extrinsic-to-decision-aids
#16
Lauren J Taylor, Sara K Johnson, Michael J Nabozny, Jennifer L Tucholka, Nicole M Steffens, Kristine L Kwekkeboom, Karen J Brasel, Toby C Campbell, Margaret L Schwarze
OBJECTIVE: We sought to characterize patterns of communication extrinsic to a decision aid that may impede goal-concordant care. BACKGROUND: Decision aids are designed to facilitate difficult clinical decisions by providing better treatment information. However, these interventions may not be sufficient to effectively reveal patient values and promote preference-aligned decisions for seriously ill, older adults. METHODS: We conducted a secondary analysis of 31 decision-making conversations between surgeons and frail, older inpatients with acute surgical problems at a single tertiary care hospital...
April 26, 2017: Annals of Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28425886/an-overview-of-teaching-communication-of-bad-news-in-medical-school-should-a-lecture-be-adequate-to-address-the-topic
#17
Filipe Coutinho, Anisha Ramessur
INTRODUCTION: Delivering bad news is very common in medical daily practice. Several studies have shown a lack of effective communication skills amongst medical students, particularly concerning how to deliver bad news. The SPIKES protocol allows communicating bad news in a 6-step method. The aim of this study is to investigate the perspective of students related to this subject. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A 45 minute lecture "Breaking Bad News" was given to 160 students in the fifth and sixth years of the Medicine course, using the SPIKES' protocol training...
December 30, 2016: Acta Médica Portuguesa
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28411519/-breaking-good-news-neurologists-experiences-of-discussing-sudep-with-patients-in-scotland
#18
Tom Nisbet, Sue Turbull, Sharon Mulhern, Saif Razvi
Since the findings of a Fatal Accident Inquiry (FAI) in 2010, clinicians working in Scotland have been advised to discuss the risk of Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP) with patients immediately or soon after a diagnosis of epilepsy is made. A thematic analysis was used to describe the experiences discussing SUDEP of 10 clinicians (six Consultant Neurologists and four Neurology Registrars) working in Scotland. Contrary to previous research, clinicians appear to be routinely discussing SUDEP in a standardized fashion with newly diagnosed patients and the FAI appears to have instigated this change in practice...
May 2017: Epilepsy & Behavior: E&B
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28390592/breaking-bad-news-quo-vadis
#19
EDITORIAL
Wolf Langewitz
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 2017: Patient Education and Counseling
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28387153/breaking-bad-news-in-spinal-cord-injury-a-qualitative-study-assessing-the-perspective-of-spinal-cord-injury-survivors-in-turkey
#20
Ozden Ozyemisci-Taskiran, Ozlem Coskun, Isil Irem Budakoglu, Nesrin Demirsoy
Prior abstract publication: 2(nd) Medical Rehabilitation Congress; Nov 4-7, 2010; Ankara, Turkey Objective: This study aims to investigate the process of breaking bad news from the perspective of spinal cord injury survivors. DESIGN: A cross sectional, qualitative study Setting: Community Participants: Fourteen spinal cord injury survivors Interventions: Subjects participated in a semi-structured interview about 'when', 'where' 'by whom' and 'how' they received and 'would' prefer to receive bad news...
April 7, 2017: Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine
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