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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29144465/parallel-palaeogenomic-transects-reveal-complex-genetic-history-of-early-european-farmers
#1
Mark Lipson, Anna Szécsényi-Nagy, Swapan Mallick, Annamária Pósa, Balázs Stégmár, Victoria Keerl, Nadin Rohland, Kristin Stewardson, Matthew Ferry, Megan Michel, Jonas Oppenheimer, Nasreen Broomandkhoshbacht, Eadaoin Harney, Susanne Nordenfelt, Bastien Llamas, Balázs Gusztáv Mende, Kitti Köhler, Krisztián Oross, Mária Bondár, Tibor Marton, Anett Osztás, János Jakucs, Tibor Paluch, Ferenc Horváth, Piroska Csengeri, Judit Koós, Katalin Sebők, Alexandra Anders, Pál Raczky, Judit Regenye, Judit P Barna, Szilvia Fábián, Gábor Serlegi, Zoltán Toldi, Emese Gyöngyvér Nagy, János Dani, Erika Molnár, György Pálfi, László Márk, Béla Melegh, Zsolt Bánfai, László Domboróczki, Javier Fernández-Eraso, José Antonio Mujika-Alustiza, Carmen Alonso Fernández, Javier Jiménez Echevarría, Ruth Bollongino, Jörg Orschiedt, Kerstin Schierhold, Harald Meller, Alan Cooper, Joachim Burger, Eszter Bánffy, Kurt W Alt, Carles Lalueza-Fox, Wolfgang Haak, David Reich
Ancient DNA studies have established that Neolithic European populations were descended from Anatolian migrants who received a limited amount of admixture from resident hunter-gatherers. Many open questions remain, however, about the spatial and temporal dynamics of population interactions and admixture during the Neolithic period. Here we investigate the population dynamics of Neolithization across Europe using a high-resolution genome-wide ancient DNA dataset with a total of 180 samples, of which 130 are newly reported here, from the Neolithic and Chalcolithic periods of Hungary (6000-2900 bc, n = 100), Germany (5500-3000 bc, n = 42) and Spain (5500-2200 bc, n = 38)...
November 16, 2017: Nature
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29142317/the-maternal-genetic-make-up-of-the-iberian-peninsula-between-the-neolithic-and-the-early-bronze-age
#2
Anna Szécsényi-Nagy, Christina Roth, Guido Brandt, Cristina Rihuete-Herrada, Cristina Tejedor-Rodríguez, Petra Held, Íñigo García-Martínez-de-Lagrán, Héctor Arcusa Magallón, Stephanie Zesch, Corina Knipper, Eszter Bánffy, Susanne Friederich, Harald Meller, Primitiva Bueno Ramírez, Rosa Barroso Bermejo, Rodrigo de Balbín Behrmann, Ana M Herrero-Corral, Raúl Flores Fernández, Carmen Alonso Fernández, Javier Jiménez Echevarria, Laura Rindlisbacher, Camila Oliart, María-Inés Fregeiro, Ignacio Soriano, Oriol Vicente, Rafael Micó, Vicente Lull, Jorge Soler Díaz, Juan Antonio López Padilla, Consuelo Roca de Togores Muñoz, Mauro S Hernández Pérez, Francisco Javier Jover Maestre, Joaquín Lomba Maurandi, Azucena Avilés Fernández, Katina T Lillios, Ana Maria Silva, Miguel Magalhães Ramalho, Luiz Miguel Oosterbeek, Claudia Cunha, Anna J Waterman, Jordi Roig Buxó, Andrés Martínez, Juana Ponce Martínez, Mark Hunt Ortiz, Juan Carlos Mejías-García, Juan Carlos Pecero Espín, Rosario Cruz-Auñón Briones, Tiago Tomé, Eduardo Carmona Ballestero, João Luís Cardoso, Ana Cristina Araújo, Corina Liesau von Lettow-Vorbeck, Concepción Blasco Bosqued, Patricia Ríos Mendoza, Ana Pujante, José I Royo-Guillén, Marco Aurelio Esquembre Beviá, Victor Manuel Dos Santos Goncalves, Rui Parreira, Elena Morán Hernández, Elena Méndez Izquierdo, Jorge Vega Y Miguel, Roberto Menduiña García, Victoria Martínez Calvo, Oscar López Jiménez, Johannes Krause, Sandra L Pichler, Rafael Garrido-Pena, Michael Kunst, Roberto Risch, Manuel A Rojo-Guerra, Wolfgang Haak, Kurt W Alt
Agriculture first reached the Iberian Peninsula around 5700 BCE. However, little is known about the genetic structure and changes of prehistoric populations in different geographic areas of Iberia. In our study, we focus on the maternal genetic makeup of the Neolithic (~ 5500-3000 BCE), Chalcolithic (~ 3000-2200 BCE) and Early Bronze Age (~ 2200-1500 BCE). We report ancient mitochondrial DNA results of 213 individuals (151 HVS-I sequences) from the northeast, central, southeast and southwest regions and thus on the largest archaeogenetic dataset from the Peninsula to date...
November 15, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29139168/hunter-gatherer-dental-pathology-do-historic-accounts-of-aboriginal-australians-correspond-to-the-archeological-record-of-dental-disease
#3
Judith Littleton
OBJECTIVES: Studies of hunter-gatherer oral pathology, particularly in Australia, often focus upon dental wear and caries or assume that historic studies of Aboriginal people reflect the precontact past. Consequently the range of population variation has been underestimated. In this paper dental pathology from human remains from Roonka are compared with a model of dental pathology derived from historic studies. The aim is to identify aspects of dental pathology indicative of regional or intra-population diversity...
November 15, 2017: American Journal of Human Biology: the Official Journal of the Human Biology Council
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29127307/climate-induced-human-demographic-and-cultural-change-in-northern-europe-during-the-mid-holocene
#4
L Warden, M Moros, T Neumann, S Shennan, A Timpson, K Manning, M Sollai, L Wacker, K Perner, K Häusler, T Leipe, L Zillén, A Kotilainen, E Jansen, R R Schneider, R Oeberst, H Arz, J S Sinninghe Damsté
The transition from hunter-gatherer-fisher groups to agrarian societies is arguably the most significant change in human prehistory. In the European plain there is evidence for fully developed agrarian societies by 7,500 cal. yr BP, yet a well-established agrarian society does not appear in the north until 6,000 cal. yr BP for unknown reasons. Here we show a sudden increase in summer temperature at 6,000 cal. yr BP in northern Europe using a well-dated, high resolution record of sea surface temperature (SST) from the Baltic Sea...
November 10, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29118138/macroecological-factors-shape-local-scale-spatial-patterns-in-agriculturalist-settlements
#5
Tingting Tao, Sebastián Abades, Shuqing Teng, Zheng Y X Huang, Luís Reino, Bin J W Chen, Yong Zhang, Chi Xu, Jens-Christian Svenning
Macro-scale patterns of human systems ranging from population distribution to linguistic diversity have attracted recent attention, giving rise to the suggestion that macroecological rules shape the assembly of human societies. However, in which aspects the geography of our own species is shaped by macroecological factors remains poorly understood. Here, we provide a first demonstration that macroecological factors shape strong local-scale spatial patterns in human settlement systems, through an analysis of spatial patterns in agriculturalist settlements in eastern mainland China based on high-resolution Google Earth images...
November 15, 2017: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29054171/the-evolution-of-human-sleep-technological-and-cultural-innovation-associated-with-sleep-wake-regulation-among-hadza-hunter-gatherers
#6
David R Samson, Alyssa N Crittenden, Ibrahim A Mabulla, Audax Z P Mabulla
Sleep is necessary for the survival of all mammalian life. In humans, recent investigations have generated critical data on the relationship between sleep and ecology in small-scale societies. Here, we report the technological and social strategies used to alter sleep environments and influence sleep duration and quality among a population of hunter-gatherers, the Hadza of Tanzania. Specifically, we investigated the effects that grass huts, sound levels, and fire had on sleep. We quantitatively compared thermal stress in outdoor environments to that found inside grass hut domiciles to test whether the huts function as thermoregulated microhabitats during the rainy season...
December 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29053746/external-auditory-exostoses-and-hearing-loss-in-the-shanidar-1-neandertal
#7
Erik Trinkaus, Sébastien Villotte
The Late Pleistocene Shanidar 1 older adult male Neandertal is known for the crushing fracture of his left orbit with a probable reduction in vision, the loss of his right forearm and hand, and evidence of an abnormal gait, as well as probable diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. He also exhibits advanced external auditory exostoses in his left auditory meatus and larger ones with complete bridging across the porus in the right meatus (both Grade 3). These growths indicate at least unilateral conductive hearing (CHL) loss, a serious sensory deprivation for a Pleistocene hunter-gatherer...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29043008/ancestors-dietary-patterns-and-environments-could-drive-positive-selection-in-genes-involved-in-micronutrient-metabolism-the-case-of-cofactor-transporters
#8
Silvia Parolo, Sébastien Lacroix, Jim Kaput, Marie-Pier Scott-Boyer
BACKGROUND: During evolution, humans colonized different ecological niches and adopted a variety of subsistence strategies that gave rise to diverse selective pressures acting across the genome. Environmentally induced selection of vitamin, mineral, or other cofactor transporters could influence micronutrient-requiring molecular reactions and contribute to inter-individual variability in response to foods and nutritional interventions. METHODS: A comprehensive list of genes coding for transporters of cofactors or their precursors was built using data mining procedures from the HGDP dataset and then explored to detect evidence of positive genetic selection...
2017: Genes & Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29035941/arterial-stiffness-and-cardiometabolic-phenotype-of-cameroonian-pygmies-and-bantus
#9
William Ngatchou, Daniel Lemogoum, Christian Mélot, Virginie Guimfacq, Philippe van de Borne, Jean Claude Wautrecht, Michel P Hermans, Luc Van Bortel, Marc Leeman
BACKGROUND: Pygmies living in the Central African rainforest with a traditional hunter-gatherer lifestyle have a low incidence of cardiovascular diseases. Because of progressive loss of traditional habitat and ancestral lands, some Pygmies have migrated to urban areas and adopt specific Bantu lifestyles such as increased salt consumption and a sedentary way of life. We tested the hypothesis that migrant Pygmies could present with hemodynamic and metabolic characteristics different from those of traditional in-situ Pygmies and possibly closer to those of Bantu farmers...
October 13, 2017: Journal of Hypertension
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29029754/oral-pathology-patterns-in-late-farmers-of-the-central-andes-a-comparative-perspective-between-coastal-and-highland-populations
#10
Luis Pezo-Lanfranco, Arturo Peralta, Sonia Guillén, Sabine Eggers
Aiming at future comparisons with earlier hunter-gatherers or transitional populations, this paper intends to characterize and describe the oral pathology pattern of late agriculturalists from Central Andes dating to the Late Intermediate Period (LIP) and Inca periods (1000-1532 CE), and identify differences and/or similarities between coastal and highland populations. Although the botanical inventories of the LIP suggest carbohydrate-rich diets and similar components, it has been hypothesized that coastal and highland populations had, nevertheless, substantially different oral pathology patterns...
October 2017: Homo: Internationale Zeitschrift Für die Vergleichende Forschung Am Menschen
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29029191/evaluating-the-neolithic-expansion-at-both-shores-of-the-mediterranean-sea
#11
João Pimenta, Alexandra M Lopes, David Comas, António Amorim, Miguel Arenas
During the Neolithic, human populations underwent cultural and technological developments that led to an agricultural revolution. Although the population genetics and evolution of European Neolithic populations have been extensively studied, little is known regarding the Neolithic expansion in North Africa with respect to Europe. One could expect that the different environmental and geological conditions at both shores of the Mediterranean Sea could have led to contrasting expansions. In order to test this hypothesis, we compared the Neolithic expansion in Europe and North Africa accounting for possible migration between them through the Strait of Gibraltar...
September 26, 2017: Molecular Biology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28994008/how-do-hunter-gatherer-children-learn-subsistence-skills-a-meta-ethnographic-review
#12
Sheina Lew-Levy, Rachel Reckin, Noa Lavi, Jurgi Cristóbal-Azkarate, Kate Ellis-Davies
Hunting and gathering is, evolutionarily, the defining subsistence strategy of our species. Studying how children learn foraging skills can, therefore, provide us with key data to test theories about the evolution of human life history, cognition, and social behavior. Modern foragers, with their vast cultural and environmental diversity, have mostly been studied individually. However, cross-cultural studies allow us to extrapolate forager-wide trends in how, when, and from whom hunter-gatherer children learn their subsistence skills...
December 2017: Human Nature: An Interdisciplinary Biosocial Perspective
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28982795/ancient-genomes-show-social-and-reproductive-behavior-of-early-upper-paleolithic-foragers
#13
Martin Sikora, Andaine Seguin-Orlando, Vitor C Sousa, Anders Albrechtsen, Thorfinn Korneliussen, Amy Ko, Simon Rasmussen, Isabelle Dupanloup, Philip R Nigst, Marjolein D Bosch, Gabriel Renaud, Morten E Allentoft, Ashot Margaryan, Sergey V Vasilyev, Elizaveta V Veselovskaya, Svetlana B Borutskaya, Thibaut Deviese, Dan Comeskey, Tom Higham, Andrea Manica, Robert Foley, David J Meltzer, Rasmus Nielsen, Laurent Excoffier, Marta Mirazon Lahr, Ludovic Orlando, Eske Willerslev
Present-day hunter-gatherers (HGs) live in multilevel social groups essential to sustain a population structure characterized by limited levels of within-band relatedness and inbreeding. When these wider social networks evolved among HGs is unknown. To investigate whether the contemporary HG strategy was already present in the Upper Paleolithic, we used complete genome sequences from Sunghir, a site dated to ~34,000 years before the present, containing multiple anatomically modern human individuals. We show that individuals at Sunghir derive from a population of small effective size, with limited kinship and levels of inbreeding similar to HG populations...
November 3, 2017: Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28971970/southern-african-ancient-genomes-estimate-modern-human-divergence-to-350-000-to-260-000-years-ago
#14
Carina M Schlebusch, Helena Malmström, Torsten Günther, Per Sjödin, Alexandra Coutinho, Hanna Edlund, Arielle R Munters, Mário Vicente, Maryna Steyn, Himla Soodyall, Marlize Lombard, Mattias Jakobsson
Southern Africa is consistently placed as a potential region for the evolution of Homo sapiens We present genome sequences, up to 13x coverage, from seven ancient individuals from KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The remains of three Stone Age hunter-gatherers (about 2000 years old) were genetically similar to current-day southern San groups, and those of four Iron Age farmers (300 to 500 years old) were genetically similar to present-day Bantu-language speakers. We estimate that all modern-day Khoe-San groups have been influenced by 9 to 30% genetic admixture from East Africans/Eurasians...
November 3, 2017: Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28967228/characterization-of-the-human-dna-gut-virome-across-populations-with-different-subsistence-strategies-and-geographical-origin
#15
Simone Rampelli, Silvia Turroni, Stephanie L Schnorr, Matteo Soverini, Sara Quercia, Monica Barone, Andrea Castagnetti, Elena Biagi, Giorgio Gallinella, Patrizia Brigidi, Marco Candela
It is a matter of fact that the human gut microbiome also includes a non-bacterial fraction represented by eukaryotic cells and viruses. To further explore the gut microbiome variation in human populations, here we characterized the human DNA viral community from publicly available gut metagenome data sets from human populations with different geographical origin and lifestyle. In particular, such data sets encompass microbiome information from two western urban societies (USA and Italy), as well as two traditional hunter-gatherer communities (the Hadza from Tanzania and Matses from Peru) and one pre-agricultural tribe (Tunapuco from Peru)...
October 2, 2017: Environmental Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28957511/inferring-past-environments-from-ancient-epigenomes
#16
David Gokhman, Anat Malul, Liran Carmel
Analyzing the conditions in which past individuals lived is key to understanding the environments and cultural transitions to which humans had to adapt. Here, we suggest a methodology to probe into past environments, using reconstructed premortem DNA methylation maps of ancient individuals. We review a large body of research showing that differential DNA methylation is associated with changes in various external and internal factors, and propose that loci whose DNA methylation level is environmentally responsive could serve as markers to infer about ancient daily life, diseases, nutrition, exposure to toxins, and more...
October 1, 2017: Molecular Biology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28938123/reconstructing-prehistoric-african-population-structure
#17
Pontus Skoglund, Jessica C Thompson, Mary E Prendergast, Alissa Mittnik, Kendra Sirak, Mateja Hajdinjak, Tasneem Salie, Nadin Rohland, Swapan Mallick, Alexander Peltzer, Anja Heinze, Iñigo Olalde, Matthew Ferry, Eadaoin Harney, Megan Michel, Kristin Stewardson, Jessica I Cerezo-Román, Chrissy Chiumia, Alison Crowther, Elizabeth Gomani-Chindebvu, Agness O Gidna, Katherine M Grillo, I Taneli Helenius, Garrett Hellenthal, Richard Helm, Mark Horton, Saioa López, Audax Z P Mabulla, John Parkington, Ceri Shipton, Mark G Thomas, Ruth Tibesasa, Menno Welling, Vanessa M Hayes, Douglas J Kennett, Raj Ramesar, Matthias Meyer, Svante Pääbo, Nick Patterson, Alan G Morris, Nicole Boivin, Ron Pinhasi, Johannes Krause, David Reich
We assembled genome-wide data from 16 prehistoric Africans. We show that the anciently divergent lineage that comprises the primary ancestry of the southern African San had a wider distribution in the past, contributing approximately two-thirds of the ancestry of Malawi hunter-gatherers ∼8,100-2,500 years ago and approximately one-third of the ancestry of Tanzanian hunter-gatherers ∼1,400 years ago. We document how the spread of farmers from western Africa involved complete replacement of local hunter-gatherers in some regions, and we track the spread of herders by showing that the population of a ∼3,100-year-old pastoralist from Tanzania contributed ancestry to people from northeastern to southern Africa, including a ∼1,200-year-old southern African pastoralist...
September 21, 2017: Cell
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28923921/color-naming-across-languages-reflects-color-use
#18
Edward Gibson, Richard Futrell, Julian Jara-Ettinger, Kyle Mahowald, Leon Bergen, Sivalogeswaran Ratnasingam, Mitchell Gibson, Steven T Piantadosi, Bevil R Conway
What determines how languages categorize colors? We analyzed results of the World Color Survey (WCS) of 110 languages to show that despite gross differences across languages, communication of chromatic chips is always better for warm colors (yellows/reds) than cool colors (blues/greens). We present an analysis of color statistics in a large databank of natural images curated by human observers for salient objects and show that objects tend to have warm rather than cool colors. These results suggest that the cross-linguistic similarity in color-naming efficiency reflects colors of universal usefulness and provide an account of a principle (color use) that governs how color categories come about...
October 3, 2017: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28894281/the-ancient-cline-of-haplogroup-k-implies-that-the-neolithic-transition-in-europe-was-mainly-demic
#19
Neus Isern, Joaquim Fort, Víctor L de Rioja
Using a database with the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of 513 Neolithic individuals, we quantify the space-time variation of the frequency of haplogroup K, previously proposed as a relevant Neolithic marker. We compare these data to simulations, based on a mathematical model in which a Neolithic population spreads from Syria to Anatolia and Europe, possibly interbreeding with Mesolithic individuals (who lack haplogroup K) and/or teaching farming to them. Both the data and the simulations show that the percentage of haplogroup K (%K) decreases with increasing distance from Syria and that, in each region, the %K tends to decrease with increasing time after the arrival of farming...
September 11, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28852094/unraveling-the-gut-microbiome-of-the-long-lived-naked-mole-rat
#20
Tewodros Debebe, Elena Biagi, Matteo Soverini, Susanne Holtze, Thomas Bernd Hildebrandt, Claudia Birkemeyer, Dereje Wyohannis, Alemayehu Lemma, Patrizia Brigidi, Vulk Savkovic, Brigitte König, Marco Candela, Gerd Birkenmeier
The naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber) is a subterranean mouse-sized African mammal that shows astonishingly few age-related degenerative changes and seems to not be affected by cancer. These features make this wild rodent an excellent model to study the biology of healthy aging and longevity. Here we characterize for the first time the intestinal microbial ecosystem of the naked mole-rat in comparison to humans and other mammals, highlighting peculiarities related to the specific living environment, such as the enrichment in bacteria able to utilize soil sulfate as a terminal electron acceptor to sustain an anaerobic oxidative metabolism...
August 29, 2017: Scientific Reports
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