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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27770113/jellyfish-stings-on-langkawi-island-malaysia
#1
M A Mohd Suan, W L Tan, S A Soelar, H P Cheng, M Osman
INTRODUCTION: Jellyfish stings are the most frequently reported marine animal envenomation worldwide. However, data on jellyfish sting from Malaysia remains obscure due to inadequate research. METHODS: We investigated the epidemiology, clinical features and treatment of patients presenting at the emergency department of Langkawi Hospital between January 2012 and December 2014. Secondary data on the nature of the incident, patient demographics, clinical presentation, and treatment were retrieved from the patients' medical records...
August 2016: Medical Journal of Malaysia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27748058/review-article-role-of-magnesium-sulphate-in-the-management-of-irukandji-syndrome-a-systematic-review
#2
John Rathbone, Richard Franklin, Clinton Gibbs, David Williams
Signs of Irukandji syndrome (IS) suggest an underlying catecholamine storm with research demonstrating that Carukia barnesi venom causes a significant rise in adrenaline/noradrenaline serum levels. A systematic review was undertaken to ascertain the current evidence in treating IS with magnesium salts. A literature search was conducted using Scopus, Medline and ScienceDirect. Further articles were discarded via title description and/or abstract details. The remaining were read in full, and those identified as not having sufficient information regarding magnesium and patient outcomes were removed...
October 17, 2016: Emergency Medicine Australasia: EMA
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27441693/thermal-and-osmotic-tolerance-of-irukandji-polyps-cubozoa-carukia-barnesi
#3
Robert Courtney, Sally Browning, Tobin Northfield, Jamie Seymour
This research explores the thermal and osmotic tolerance of the polyp stage of the Irukandji jellyfish Carukia barnesi, which provides new insights into potential polyp habitat suitability. The research also targets temperature, salinity, feeding frequency, and combinations thereof, as cues for synchronous medusae production. Primary findings revealed 100% survivorship in osmotic treatments between 19 and 46‰, with the highest proliferation at 26‰. As salinity levels of 26‰ do not occur within the waters of the Great Barrier Reef or Coral Sea, we conclude that the polyp stage of C...
2016: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26954781/early-life-history-of-the-irukandji-jellyfish-carukia-barnesi
#4
Robert Courtney, Sally Browning, Jamie Seymour
Adult medusae of Carukia barnesi were collected near Double Island, North Queensland Australia. From 73 specimens, 8 males and 15 females spawned under laboratory conditions. These gametes were artificially mixed which resulted in fertilized eggs. Post fertilization, most eggs developed to an encapsulated planula stage and then paused for between six days and six months prior to hatching as ciliated planulae. The paused stage planulae were negatively buoyant and adhered to substrate. The first planula was produced six days post fertilization, lacked larval ocelli, remained stationary, or moved very slowly for two days prior to metamorphosis into primary polyps...
2016: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26598636/bet-2-role-of-vinegar-in-irukandji-syndrome
#5
REVIEW
Deepak Doshi, Bernard A Foëx, Yogesh Nataly
A shortcut review was carried out to establish whether dousing areas of contact with vinegar could relieve the symptoms of Irukandji syndrome. Four studies were directly relevant to the question. The author, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses of these papers are tabulated. The clinical bottom line is there is a lack of evidence for effectiveness and the latest local guidelines should be followed.
December 2015: Emergency Medicine Journal: EMJ
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25694497/towards-evidence-based-emergency-medicine-best-bets-from-the-manchester-royal-infirmary-bet-1-role-of-vinegar-in-irukandji-syndrome
#6
REVIEW
Deepak Doshi, Bernard A Foëx, Yogesh Nataly
A shortcut review was carried out to establish whether dousing areas of contact with vinegar could relieve the symptoms of Irukandji syndrome. Four studies were directly relevant to the question. The author, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses of these papers are tabulated. The clinical bottom line is there is a lack of evidence for effectiveness and the latest local guidelines should be followed.
March 2015: Emergency Medicine Journal: EMJ
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25688956/marine-envenomations
#7
Ingrid Berling, Geoffrey Isbister
BACKGROUND: Marine stings are common but most are minor and do not require medical intervention. Severe and systemic marine envenoming is uncommon, but includes box jellyfish stings, Irukandji syndrome, major stingray trauma and blue-ringed octopus envenoming. Almost all marine injuries are caused by jellyfish stings, and penetrating injuries from spiny fish, stingrays or sea urchins. OBJECTIVE: This article describes the presentation and management of marine envenomations and injuries that may occur in Australia...
January 2015: Australian Family Physician
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/24829278/dangerous-jellyfish-blooms-are-predictable
#8
Lisa-ann Gershwin, Scott A Condie, Jim V Mansbridge, Anthony J Richardson
The potentially fatal Irukandji syndrome is relatively common in tropical waters throughout the world. It is caused by the sting of the Irukandji jellyfish, a family of box jellyfish that are almost impossible to detect in the water owing to their small size and transparency. Using collated medical records of stings and local weather conditions, we show that the presence of Irukandji blooms in coastal waters can be forecast on the basis of wind conditions. On the Great Barrier Reef, blooms largely coincide with relaxation of the prevailing southeasterly trade winds, with average conditions corresponding to near zero alongshore wind on the day prior to the sting...
July 6, 2014: Journal of the Royal Society, Interface
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/24323533/irukandji-jellyfish-polyps-exhibit-tolerance-to-interacting-climate-change-stressors
#9
Shannon G Klein, Kylie A Pitt, Kristen A Rathjen, Jamie E Seymour
Increasing ocean temperatures and strengthening boundary currents have caused the poleward migration of many marine species. Cubozoan jellyfish known to cause Irukandji syndrome have historically been confined to tropical waters but may be expanding into subtropical regions. Here, we examine the interactive effects of warming and acidification on the population dynamics of polyps of an Irukandji jellyfish, Alatina nr mordens, and the formation of statoliths in newly metamorphosed medusae, to determine if this jellyfish could tolerate future conditions predicted for southeast Queensland (SEQ), Australia...
January 2014: Global Change Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/24318773/interventions-for-the-symptoms-and-signs-resulting-from-jellyfish-stings
#10
REVIEW
Li Li, Richard G McGee, Geoff Isbister, Angela C Webster
BACKGROUND: Jellyfish envenomations are common amongst temperate coastal regions and vary in severity depending on the species. Stings result in a variety of symptoms and signs, including pain, dermatological reactions and, in some species, Irukandji syndrome (including abdominal/back/chest pain, tachycardia, hypertension, sweating, piloerection, agitation and sometimes cardiac complications). Many treatments have been suggested for the symptoms and signs of jellyfish stings. However, it is unclear which interventions are most effective...
December 9, 2013: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/24182899/biology-and-ecology-of-irukandji-jellyfish-cnidaria-cubozoa
#11
Lisa-ann Gershwin, Anthony J Richardson, Kenneth D Winkel, Peter J Fenner, John Lippmann, Russell Hore, Griselda Avila-Soria, David Brewer, Rudy J Kloser, Andy Steven, Scott Condie
Irukandji stings are a leading occupational health and safety issue for marine industries in tropical Australia and an emerging problem elsewhere in the Indo-Pacific and Caribbean. Their mild initial sting frequently results in debilitating illness, involving signs of sympathetic excess including excruciating pain, sweating, nausea and vomiting, hypertension and a feeling of impending doom; some cases also experience acute heart failure and pulmonary oedema. These jellyfish are typically small and nearly invisible, and their infestations are generally mysterious, making them scary to the general public, irresistible to the media, and disastrous for tourism...
2013: Advances in Marine Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/23508658/long-term-analysis-of-irukandji-stings-in-far-north-queensland
#12
Teresa J Carrette, Jamie J Seymour
INTRODUCTION: We reviewed the occurrence, trends, definition and severity of the Irukandji syndrome for the Cairns region of North Queensland, Australia. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of patient files from two sources was conducted: historic accounts kept by Dr Jack Barnes for the period 1942 to 1967, and records from the Emergency Unit in Cairns Base Hospital for 1995 to 2007. RESULTS: There has been a significant increase in the length of the Irukandji season since it was first reliably recorded (15 days in 1961; 151 days in 2002); however, annual numbers of envenomations were highly variable...
March 2013: Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine: the Journal of the South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/23431853/public-authority-responses-to-marine-stinger-public-health-risks-a-scenario-analysis-of-the-irukandji-health-threat-in-controlled-spaces-at-public-beaches-in-australia
#13
Lynda Crowley-Cyr
This scenario analysis was undertaken to anticipate the likelihood of public authority liability for negligence arising from harm associated with the relatively new phenomenon of the Irukandji marine stinger health threat in Australia. The tort of negligence is about allocating liability for wrongs typically committed by one person or entity against another. The author questions whether a person who enters a marine stinger enclosure at one of Australia's patrolled and flagged beaches and suffers serious injury from an Irukandji sting can seek compensation or damages in negligence against government...
December 2012: Journal of Law and Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/23258458/irukandji-syndrome-a-widely-misunderstood-and-poorly-researched-tropical-marine-envenoming
#14
REVIEW
Teresa J Carrette, Avril H Underwood, Jamie E Seymour
Irukandji syndrome is a poorly defined set of symptoms that occur after envenoming by certain species of jellyfish, primarily cubozoans or 'box jellyfish'. Envenomed victims can show symptoms ranging from headaches, severe pain, nausea and vomiting to pulmonary oedema, cardiac failure and severe hypertension resulting in death. Historically, this syndrome appears to have been misdiagnosed and reported cases are undoubtedly a significant underestimation of the prevalence of this syndrome. The variation in symptoms has resulted in a myriad of treatments though none has been established as definitive...
December 2012: Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine: the Journal of the South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/23039299/randomised-trial-of-magnesium-in-the-treatment-of-irukandji-syndrome
#15
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Nora McCullagh, Peter Pereira, Paul Cullen, Richard Mulcahy, Robert Bonin, Mark Little, Suzanne Gray, Jamie Seymour
OBJECTIVES: Irukandji syndrome is a distressing condition characterised by pain, hypertension and tachycardia. Some develop cardiac failure and there have been two reported deaths. Magnesium sulphate has become the standard of care despite minimal evidence. The aim of this study was to investigate if magnesium would reduce analgesic requirement and length of stay for patients with Irukandji syndrome. METHODS: This was a double-blind, randomised controlled clinical trial...
October 2012: Emergency Medicine Australasia: EMA
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/22753247/severe-irukandji-like-jellyfish-stings-in-thai-waters
#16
Peter J Fenner, John Lippmann
Over recent years, there have been more widely-reported sightings of chirodropids and carybdeids in Thailand. There has also been an increased awareness and documentation of fatal and severe non-fatal jellyfish stings occurring in Thai waters. Although the victims are usually swimming or wading in shallow water, divers are also at risk. Despite generally wearing some protective coverings while diving in the tropics, parts of a diver's body often remain exposed and divers can and do sustain severe and/or life-threatening jellyfish stings...
September 2009: Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine: the Journal of the South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/22361384/australian-carybdeid-jellyfish-causing-irukandji-syndrome
#17
REVIEW
James Tibballs, Ran Li, Heath A Tibballs, Lisa-Ann Gershwin, Ken D Winkel
The Australian carybdeid jellyfish associated with Irukandji syndrome is Carukia barnesi, (Barnes' jellyfish). Other Australian carybdeid jellyfish that may be associated with the syndrome include Carukia shinju, Carybdea xaymacana, Malo maxima, Malo kingi, Alatina mordens, Gerongia rifkinae, and Morbakka fenneri ("Morbakka"). These small jellyfish are difficult to capture and identify. They are located offshore of the coasts of Australian states including Queensland, The Northern Territory, Western Australia and South Australia...
May 2012: Toxicon: Official Journal of the International Society on Toxinology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/22000547/irukandji-sydrome-in-the-torres-strait-a-series-of-8-cases
#18
Lachlan J McIver, Irene G Tjhung, Shaun T Parish, Ruth C Derkenne, Alexander N Kippin
OBJECTIVE: To review the presentations of a series of patients with suspected Irukandji syndrome in the Torres Strait, where the syndrome has hitherto been unknown or undocumented, in order to identify at-risk groups and improve the management of this condition in the region. METHODS: A mixed retrospective-prospective review of eight cases of patients with suspected Irukandji syndrome in the Torres Strait, with a focus on the differences between the clinical presentations and patient outcomes...
December 2011: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/21878023/how-the-creative-spirit-saved-me-from-a-fate-worse-than-hospitalization
#19
Ross O'Donovan
Ross is a mental health patient representative based in Cairns and has been a member of the Cairns CAG for the past eight years. He has played a significant role in the development of consumer participation in Cairns and at a state level. Ross has sat on a range of committees as a consumer representative and has worked as an accreditor with the Institute of Healthy Communities Australia. Currently he sits on the management committee of the Queensland Voice for Mental Health. Ross was a founding member of the Irukandji Pens writers group, based at the Cairns Mental Health Resource Service...
July 2011: Australasian Psychiatry: Bulletin of Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/21824077/immunological-and-toxinological-responses-to-jellyfish-stings
#20
REVIEW
James Tibballs, Angel A Yanagihara, Helen C Turner, Ken Winkel
Just over a century ago, animal responses to injections of jellyfish extracts unveiled the phenomenon of anaphylaxis. Yet, until very recently, understanding of jellyfish sting toxicity has remained limited. Upon contact, jellyfish stinging cells discharge complex venoms, through thousands of barbed tubules, into the skin resulting in painful and, potentially, lethal envenomations. This review examines the immunological and toxinological responses to stings by prominent species of jellyfish including Physalia sp (Portuguese Man-o-War, Blue-bottle), Cubozoan jellyfish including Chironex fleckeri, several Carybdeids including Carybdea arborifera and Alatina moseri, Linuche unguiculta (Thimble jellyfish), a jellyfish responsible for Irukandji syndrome (Carukia barnesi) and Pelagia noctiluca...
October 2011: Inflammation & Allergy Drug Targets
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