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Alanna Van Hooser, Todd R Williams, Daniel T Myers
Mucinous appendiceal neoplasms are uncommon, but important to recognize with imaging due to malignant potential. Peritoneal seeding and pseudomyxoma peritonei can occur with both frankly malignant as well as low-grade appendiceal neoplasms. Prospective imaging identification of potential appendiceal neoplasm is paramount to clinical/surgical management. When a mucinous appendiceal neoplasm is suspected, a right hemicolectomy with lymph node dissection is the preferred surgical management. Unfortunately, accurate preoperative diagnosis can be challenging due to a wide range of clinical presentations and overlapping imaging appearances of appendiceal neoplasms with benign entities...
March 21, 2018: Abdominal Radiology
Daniella Braz Parente, Jaime Araújo Oliveira Neto, Antonio Luis Eiras de Araújo, Rosana Souza Rodrigues, Renata Mello Perez, Edson Marchiori
The aim of this pictorial essay is to review the spectrum of fat-containing liver lesions and their characterisation on magnetic resonance imaging with focus on the radiological features that aid in the differential diagnoses. Fat-containing liver lesions comprise a heterogeneous group of tumours with variable imaging findings. Magnetic resonance imaging clearly displays the micro- and macroscopic fat components of the lesions and other characteristic features that are helpful tools to make the differential diagnosis...
January 2018: Radiologia Brasileira
Anisha Garg, Karen B Mulloy
OBJECTIVES: Pilot study incorporating environmental and occupational health (EOH) learning objectives into medical school curriculum using problem based learning approach. METHODS: 184 Case Western Reserve University medical students participated in problem based learning curriculum emphasizing EOH topics. Multiple choice (MCQ), short essay (SEQ), and summative short essay (SSEQ) questions assessed student knowledge. Two rating scale questions and one open-ended question determined student attitudes and confidence...
March 19, 2018: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Angela E Douglas
Microbiome science is revealing that the phenotype and health of animals, including humans, depend on the sustained function of their resident microorganisms. In this essay, I argue for thoughtful choice of model systems for human microbiome science. A greater variety of experimental systems, including wider use of invertebrate models, would benefit biomedical research, while systems ill-suited to experimental and genetic manipulation can be used to address very limited sets of scientific questions. Microbiome science benefits from the coordinated use of multiple systems, which is facilitated by networks of researchers with expertise in different experimental systems...
March 19, 2018: PLoS Biology
Melanie Birks, John Smithson, Janene Antney, Lin Zhao, Camilla Burkot
BACKGROUND: Universities' responsibility to ensure academic integrity is frustrated by software and communication tools that facilitate content reuse coupled with a growing international essay writing economy. A wide range of behaviours constitute academic dishonesty and while a complex phenomenon to examine, existing evidence suggests that there is sufficient proliferation (both in volume and variety) of these behaviours among Australian university students to warrant concern. This proliferation presents faculty and staff with new challenges in ensuring academic integrity...
March 2, 2018: Nurse Education Today
Cody Cichowitz, Leonard Rubenstein, Chris Beyrer
In an essay, Cody Cichowitz and colleagues discuss approaches to preventing the practice of inappropriate anal examination.
March 2018: PLoS Medicine
Cary Moskovitz
Text recycling, often called "self-plagiarism", is the practice of reusing textual material from one's prior documents in a new work. The practice presents a complex set of ethical and practical challenges to the scientific community, many of which have not been addressed in prior discourse on the subject. This essay identifies and discusses these factors in a systematic fashion, concluding with a new definition of text recycling that takes these factors into account. Topics include terminology, what is not text recycling, factors affecting judgements about the appropriateness of text recycling, and visual materials...
March 15, 2018: Science and Engineering Ethics
J South, A M Connolly, J A Stansfield, P Johnstone, G Henderson, K A Fenton
There is a strong evidence-based rationale for community capacity building and community empowerment as part of a strategic response to reduce health inequalities. Within the current UK policy context, there are calls for increased public engagement in prevention and local decision-making in order to give people greater control over the conditions that determine health. With reference to the challenges and opportunities within the English public health system, this essay seeks to open debate about what is required to mainstream community-centred approaches and ensure that the public is central to public health...
March 13, 2018: Journal of Public Health
Jacob W P Potuijt, Martijn Baas, Rivka Sukenik-Halevy, Hannie Douben, Picard Nguyen, Deon J Venter, Renée Gallagher, Sigrid M Swagemakers, Steven E R Hovius, Christianne A van Nieuwenhoven, Robert-Jan H Galjaard, Peter J van der Spek, Nadav Ahituv, Annelies de Klein
PurposeThe zone of polarizing activity regulatory sequence (ZRS) is an enhancer that regulates sonic hedgehog during embryonic limb development. Recently, mutations in a noncoding evolutionary conserved sequence 500 bp upstream of the ZRS, termed the pre-ZRS (pZRS), have been associated with polydactyly in dogs and humans. Here, we report the first case of triphalangeal thumb-polysyndactyly syndrome (TPT-PS) to be associated with mutations in this region and show via mouse enhancer assays how this mutation leads to ectopic expression throughout the developing limb bud...
March 15, 2018: Genetics in Medicine: Official Journal of the American College of Medical Genetics
David Loxterkamp
At the end of the Second World War, the US birth rate peaked at nearly 27 births per 1,000 population-a rate unparalleled in the previous 3 decades, and one that would not be repeated. That Boomer generation is now retiring. How do those of us caught in the wave feel about stepping back? Who will step in to replace us? And how will we replace the loss of purpose and fulfillment that comes from a career in medicine? A lengthening life expectancy has challenged many of us to consider the "second act" to our adult life...
March 2018: Annals of Family Medicine
Thomas R Egnew
Many clinicians may feel poorly prepared to manage patient suffering resulting from the travails of chronic illness. This essay explores the thesis that chronically and terminally ill patients can be holistically healed by transcending the suffering occasioned by the degradations of their illnesses. Suffering is conveyed as a story and clinicians can encourage healing by co-constructing patients' illness stories. By addressing the inevitable existential conflicts uncovered in patients' narratives and helping them edit their stories to promote acceptance and meaning, suffering can be transcended...
March 2018: Annals of Family Medicine
Kathleen Hall Jamieson
After documenting the existence and exploring some implications of three alternative news narratives about science and its challenges, this essay outlines ways in which those who communicate science can more accurately convey its investigatory process, self-correcting norms, and remedial actions, without in the process legitimizing an unwarranted "science is broken/in crisis" narrative. The three storylines are: ( i ) quest discovery, which features scientists producing knowledge through an honorable journey; ( ii ) counterfeit quest discovery, which centers on an individual or group of scientists producing a spurious finding through a dishonorable one; and ( iii ) a systemic problem structure, which suggests that some of the practices that protect science are broken, or worse, that science is no longer self-correcting or in crisis...
March 13, 2018: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Joshua Shaw
This essay considers one argument used to defend parents who use preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) to select for deafness and other disabilities. Some bioethicists have argued that a distinction should be drawn between genetically modifying embryos to possess disabilities and using PGD to select embryos that already present markers of them, and that the former is unethical because it inflicts avoidable harms onto the resulting children, whereas the latter is permissible because it allows children with potentially impaired abilities to exist...
April 2018: New Bioethics: a Multidisciplinary Journal of Biotechnology and the Body
Netta Weinstein, Nicole Legate, William S Ryan, Laura Hemmy
OBJECTIVE: Work on longevity has found protective social, cognitive and emotional factors, but to date we have little understanding of the impact of motivational dynamics. Autonomy orientation, or stable patterns of self-regulation, is theorized to be a protective factor for long-term mental and physical health (Ryan & Deci, 2017), and is therefore a prime candidate for examining how stable psychosocial factors are linked to longevity, or life expectancy. METHOD: Essays written in the 1930s by participants in the Nun Study were coded for indicators of an autonomy orientation...
March 10, 2018: Journal of Personality
Louise Polson
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2018: Rural and Remote Health
Giovanni Traverso, Ameya R Kirtane, Carl M Schoellhammer, Robert Langer
The void between drug discovery and successful translation to humans is vast. In order to develop effective solutions, convergence of a multidisciplinary team with a range of expertise is required. In this Essay, examples of successful sustained delivery systems for antimalarials and antiretrovirals, as well as to the gastrointestinal tract are discussed.
March 9, 2018: Angewandte Chemie
Davide Margola, Gabriele Travagin, John Lawrence Dennis
Can the retelling of an unpleasant experience help adolescents cope with that experience? This study answers that question by looking at the role of psychological self-distancing when adolescents write about recently untold stressful events with peers using either a traditional expressive writing (EW) intervention or a cognitively oriented expressive writing (CEW) intervention. Extent of self-distancing (i.e., low and high) as well as its variability (i.e., increasing or stable) were taken into account. Data, obtained from 292 written essays from 78 Italian adolescents (mean age was 12...
March 5, 2018: Journal of Adolescence
Merle I Ronden, David Palma, Ben J Slotman, Suresh Senan
Distinctive patterns of early and late benign fibrosis are commonly observed after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for lung malignancies. These changes on computed tomographic scans need to be distinguished from so-called 'high-risk' radiological features, which can be associated with a higher risk for tumor recurrence. This pictorial report illustrates the different radiological changes seen following SABR delivered using the volumetric modulated radiotherapy, a technique which is increasingly used in clinical care...
March 5, 2018: Journal of Thoracic Oncology
Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira Brilhante, Edmilson Emanuel Monteiro Correia, Glaucia Morgana de Melo Guedes, Jonathas Sales de Oliveira, Débora de Souza Collares Maia Castelo-Branco, Rossana de Aguiar Cordeiro, Adriana de Queiroz Pinheiro, Lúcio Jackson Queiroz Chaves, Waldemiro de Aquino Pereira Neto, José Júlio Costa Sidrim, Marcos Fábio Gadelha Rocha
BACKGROUND: As shown by recent researches, most of the clinically relevant fungi, including dermatophytes, form biofilms in vitro and in vivo, which may present antimicrobial tolerance favoring recurrent infections. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of itraconazole (ITC), voriconazole (VCZ) and griseofulvin (GRI) against Trichophyton rubrum, Trichophyton tonsurans, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Microsporum canis and Microsporum gypseum, in planktonic and biofilm growth...
March 8, 2018: Mycoses
Mattias Strand
French historian and literary critic René Girard (1923-2015), most widely known for the concepts of mimetic desire and scapegoating, also engaged in the discussion of the surge of eating disorders in his 1996 essay Eating Disorders and Mimetic Desire. This article explores Girard's ideas on the mimetic nature and origin of eating disorders from a clinical psychiatric perspective and contextualizes them within the field of eating disorders research as well as in relation to broader psychological, sociological and anthropological models of social comparison and non-consumption...
March 7, 2018: Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry
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