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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28934034/transfiguring-light-and-symphonic-blooming-a-wabi-sabi-story-of-humanbecoming-and-human-caring
#1
Lois S Kelley
Transfiguring Light and Symphonic Blooming is word-art to describe the flowering of the humanbecoming and human caring schools of thought over time. A Wabi Sabi story journey was created to turn the tide in a world where the building of a unique body of knowledge for nursing has fallen into disfavor with nursing itself. Using nature-aligned paintings and a Japanese story-art aesthetic with poetry, the beauty of falling away to unitary essentials and holding the value of "both-and" in unitary consciousness was illuminated...
October 2017: Nursing Science Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28905649/participatory-arts-programs-in-residential-dementia-care-playing-with-language-differences
#2
Aagje Swinnen, Kate de Medeiros
This article examines connections between language, identity, and cultural difference in the context of participatory arts in residential dementia care. Specifically, it looks at how language differences become instruments for the language play that characterizes the participatory arts programs, TimeSlips and the Alzheimer's Poetry Project. These are two approaches that are predominantly spoken-word driven. Although people living with dementia experience cognitive decline that affects language, they are linguistic agents capable of participating in ongoing negotiation processes of connection, belonging, and in- and exclusion through language use...
January 1, 2017: Dementia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28902055/poetry-art-and-the-bible
#3
Sharon Fish Mooney
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2017: Journal of Christian Nursing: a Quarterly Publication of Nurses Christian Fellowship
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28889178/music-and-speech-distractors-disrupt-sensorimotor-synchronization-effects-of-musical-training
#4
Anita Białuńska, Simone Dalla Bella
Humans display a natural tendency to move to the beat of music, more than to the rhythm of any other auditory stimulus. We typically move with music, but rarely with speech. This proclivity is apparent early during development and can be further developed over the years via joint dancing, singing, or instrument playing. Synchronization of movement to the beat can thus improve with age, but also with musical experience. In a previous study, we found that music perturbed synchronization with a metronome more than speech fragments; music superiority disappeared when distractors shared isochrony and the same meter (Dalla Bella et al...
September 9, 2017: Experimental Brain Research. Experimentelle Hirnforschung. Expérimentation Cérébrale
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28813243/arts-participation-counterbalancing-forces-to-the-social-stigma-of-a-dementia-diagnosis
#5
Beth Bienvenu, Gay Hanna
A diagnosis of dementia profoundly impacts a person in terms of both the functional progression of the disease and the social stigma associated with the diagnosis. A growing body of research demonstrates the effectiveness of innovative programs such as the Alzheimer's Poetry Project, Meet Me at MoMA, and TimeSlips™ in counterbalancing social stigma by building a social and emotional framework for strength-based living for people diagnosed with dementia through arts participation. These programs focus on supporting autonomy and generativity through creative expression to help sustain the social, emotional, and community fabric of people's lives in the face of significant counterbalancing forces (e...
July 1, 2017: AMA Journal of Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28810089/the-healing-arts-through-poetry-a-rush-to-undertake-a-fool-s-errand
#6
Henry Travers
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2017: South Dakota Medicine: the Journal of the South Dakota State Medical Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28806713/activity-groups-for-persons-with-dementia-personal-predictors-of-participation-engagement-and-mood
#7
Jiska Cohen-Mansfield
This study examined the relationship between personal characteristics and attendance, engagement, sleep, and mood outcomes of persons with dementia participating in group activities. The purpose of this study is to examine which persons with dementia benefit most from group interventions. Sixty-nine persons with dementia were observed by research and therapeutic recreation staff during 10 types of group activities (reading aloud with discussion, choral-singing, baking, creative storytelling, brain games, active games, exercise, reminiscence poetry, holiday newsletter, and holiday discussions) on multiple outcomes (attendance duration, sleep, engagement, active participation, attitude, and positive mood)...
July 25, 2017: Psychiatry Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28756412/heartfelt-images-learning-cardiac-science-artistically
#8
Carol Ann Courneya
There are limited curricular options for medical students to engage in art-making during their training. Yet, it is known that art-making confers a variety of benefits related to learning. This qualitative study utilises a visual methodology to explore students' art-making in the context of the cardiovascular sciences. The existence of a multiyear repository of medical/dental student generated, cardiac-inspired art, collected over 6 years, provided the opportunity to explore the nature of the art made. The aim was to categorise the art produced, as well as the depth and breadth of understanding required to produce the art...
July 29, 2017: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28750892/getting-poetic-with-data-using-poetry-to-disseminate-the-first-person-voices-of-parents-of-children-with-a-disability
#9
Bernie Carter, Caroline Sanders, Lucy Bray
OBJECTIVE: This paper considers the limitations of traditional prose-based approaches to research dissemination and explores the potential merits and tensions in adopting a poetic approach to disseminate participants' experiences and perspectives. DISCUSSION: Drawing on our experience of using I-poetry to create first-person poems from our research data we discuss the attractiveness of the subjective, expressive and relational opportunities of poetry, and its ability to compress experience and create emotional connections and evoke emotion...
July 4, 2017: Patient Education and Counseling
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28746376/expressive-intent-ambiguity-and-aesthetic-experiences-of-music-and-poetry
#10
Elizabeth Hellmuth Margulis, William H Levine, Rhimmon Simchy-Gross, Carolyn Kroger
A growing number of studies are investigating the way that aesthetic experiences are generated across different media. Empathy with a perceived human artist has been suggested as a common mechanism [1]. In this study, people heard 30 s excerpts of ambiguous music and poetry preceded by neutral, positively valenced, or negatively valenced information about the composer's or author's intent. The information influenced their perception of the excerpts-excerpts paired with positive intent information were perceived as happier and excerpts paired with negative intent information were perceived as sadder (although across intent conditions, musical excerpts were perceived as happier than poetry excerpts)...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28693827/giovanni-boccaccio-s-1313-1375-disease-and-demise-the-final-untold-tale-of-liver-and-heart-failure
#11
Francesco M Galassi, Fabrizio Toscano, Emanuele Armocida, Giovanni Spani, Michael Papio, Frank J Rühli
Giovanni Boccaccio's fatal disease(s) and cause of death have long remained a mystery. Now, for the first time, a thorough multidisciplinary reassessment has finally been carried out. By combining philological and clinical approaches, it is at last possible to suggest a solid retrospective diagnosis based upon a study of his correspondence, poetry and iconography, as well as references to his physical decay in coeval and later sources. It would appear that he suffered over the last three years of his life from hepatic and cardiac failure, conditions that resulted in edema and potentially even hepatic carcinoma...
June 13, 2017: Homo: Internationale Zeitschrift Für die Vergleichende Forschung Am Menschen
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28681485/unlocking-stories-older-women-s-experiences-of-intimate-partner-violence-told-through-creative-expression
#12
J McGarry, D Bowden
WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT: Intimate partner violence (IPV) impacts significantly on the lives and health of those who experience abuse The impact of IPV exerts a detrimental impact on mental health as well as physical health, but this is often not recognized by professionals WHAT THE STUDY ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE: This study highlights the impact of IPV on the lives and health of older women from the perspective of older women themselves The approach taken to the study illuminates the ways in which older women describe their experiences within the broader narratives of their experiences This study has explored the particular situation for older women as told through creative expression and their own stories of survivorship...
July 6, 2017: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28663070/poetry-in-motion-increased-chromosomal-mobility-after-dna-damage
#13
REVIEW
Michael J Smith, Rodney Rothstein
Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are among the most lethal DNA lesions, and a variety of pathways have evolved to manage their repair in a timely fashion. One such pathway is homologous recombination (HR), in which information from an undamaged donor site is used as a template for repair. Although many of the biochemical steps of HR are known, the physical movements of chromosomes that must underlie the pairing of homologous sequence during mitotic DSB repair have remained mysterious. Recently, several groups have begun to use a variety of genetic and cell biological tools to study this important question...
August 2017: DNA Repair
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28649114/technological-nocturne-the-lisbon-industrial-institute-and-romantic-engineering-1849-1888
#14
Tiago Saraiva, Ana Cardoso De Matos
This article explores technology as romantic culture in the second half of the nineteenth century. It details how new urban nocturnal experiences emerged from the Lisbon Industrial Institute (Instituto Industrial) founded in 1852. It combines the interest in the space of science production, typical of history of science and science studies, with the attention to production and consumption of lighting more commonly found in history of technology and urban history literature. Engineers' practices are put in a cultural continuum with poetry, opera, and modern city life at large...
2017: Technology and Culture
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28635450/you-don-t-have-to-know-the-answers-to-write-poetry
#15
Molly Case
It's a great pleasure to be able to spend the next six months as the RCN's first ever writer in residence. My role is part of an exciting new project at the RCN Library and Archive called Service Scrapbooks: Nursing, Storytelling and the First World War, which is funded by a £60,600 grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund.
June 21, 2017: Nursing Standard
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28613132/the-wheel-and-the-ladder-freudian-and-loewaldian-accounts-of-individuation
#16
Linus Recht
In this paper, I use comparisons of Freud, Loewald, and Plato to explore what it means to individuate and to desire in a world of frustration, pain, and loss. The metaphors of the "wheel" versus the "ladder" present basic images for Freud's tragic conception of a person's emerging into a world of pain, transience and loss, in contrast to Loewald's sense of individuation as an increasing attainment of individual ego and world enrichment, constructed from metabolized grieved objects. I then argue that Plato's Symposium offers comparable visions of the possibilities of love, and that the juxtaposition of Freud and Loewald can be connected to ancient philosophical considerations...
June 2017: Psychoanalytic Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28602403/panacea-in-progress-crispr-and-the-future-of-its-biological-research-introduction
#17
REVIEW
Michael Carroll, Xiaohui Zhou
The elucidation of the CRISPR (clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats) adaptive immune system endogenous to most microbial life has culminated in progress in a diversity of scientific disciplines. The concurrently promising and eccentric nature of its theoretically plausible applications has wrought enthusiasm in the research community globally, potentiating advancements in human and animal health, ecological stability, and economic wellbeing, that would hitherto be considered the unattainable fancies of a futurist...
August 2017: Microbiological Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28574679/depiction-of-a-17th-century-tooth-extraction-a-drawing-by-adriaen-pietersz-van-de-venne-dutch-1589-1662
#18
David A Chernin
A prolific and inventive painter, draftsman, and poet, Adriaen Pietersz van de Venne was born in Delft in 1589. His wealthy parents had fled from Protestant persecution in the Southern (Spanish) Netherlands during the 1580s. Van de Venne was educated in Leiden, where he became part of the vibrant political and intellectual community around the University. He settled in Middleburg, in Zeeland, by 1614; his earliest dated paintings are also from this year. In 1625, van de Venne moved to The Hague, where he remained until his dealth...
2017: Journal of the History of Dentistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28569605/dying-is-unexpectedly-positive
#19
Amelia Goranson, Ryan S Ritter, Adam Waytz, Michael I Norton, Kurt Gray
In people's imagination, dying seems dreadful; however, these perceptions may not reflect reality. In two studies, we compared the affective experience of people facing imminent death with that of people imagining imminent death. Study 1 revealed that blog posts of near-death patients with cancer and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis were more positive and less negative than the simulated blog posts of nonpatients-and also that the patients' blog posts became more positive as death neared. Study 2 revealed that the last words of death-row inmates were more positive and less negative than the simulated last words of noninmates-and also that these last words were less negative than poetry written by death-row inmates...
May 1, 2017: Psychological Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28560354/citation-analysis-of-scientific-categories
#20
Gregory S Patience, Christian A Patience, Bruno Blais, Francois Bertrand
Databases catalogue the corpus of research literature into scientific categories and report classes of bibliometric data such as the number of citations to articles, the number of authors, journals, funding agencies, institutes, references, etc. The number of articles and citations in a category are gauges of productivity and scientific impact but a quantitative basis to compare researchers between categories is limited. Here, we compile a list of bibliometric indicators for 236 science categories and citation rates of the 500 most cited articles of each category...
May 2017: Heliyon
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