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Objection of conscience

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28050912/conflicts-of-conscience-in-the-neonatal-intensive-care-unit
#1
Natalie J Ford, Wendy Austin
BACKGROUND: Limited knowledge of the experiences of conflicts of conscience found in nursing literature. OBJECTIVES: To explore the individual experiences of a conflict of conscience for neonatal nurses in Alberta. RESEARCH DESIGN: Interpretive description was selected to help situate the findings in a meaningful clinical context. Participants and research context: Five interviews with neonatal nurses working in Neonatal Intensive Care Units throughout Alberta...
January 1, 2017: Nursing Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28042920/being-a-close-family-member-of-a-person-with-dementia-living-in-a-nursing-home
#2
Berit Seiger Cronfalk, Britt-Marie Ternestedt, Astrid Norberg
AIM: The objectives of this study were to illuminate how family members of persons with dementia describe their own experiences, before and after placing the relative in a nursing home. Background In the western world and with a growing population of older people, the number of persons with dementia increase. Family members often become carers in their own homes creating stressful and exhausting situation that eventually leads to re-locating the person to a 6 nursing home. This may lead to troubled conscience among family members...
January 2, 2017: Journal of Clinical Nursing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28008640/objection-to-conscience-an-argument-against-conscience-exemptions-in-healthcare
#3
Alberto Giubilini
I argue that appeals to conscience do not constitute reasons for granting healthcare professionals exemptions from providing services they consider immoral (e.g. abortion). My argument is based on a comparison between a type of objection that many people think should be granted, i.e. to abortion, and one that most people think should not be granted, i.e. to antibiotics. I argue that there is no principled reason in favour of conscientious objection qua conscientious that allows to treat these two cases differently...
December 23, 2016: Bioethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28004463/duty-and-dilemma-perioperative-nurses-hiding-an-objection-to-participate-in-organ-procurement-surgery
#4
Zaneta Smith
Perioperative nurses assist in organ procurement surgery; however, there is a dearth of information of how they encounter making conscientious objection requests or refusals to participate in organ procurement surgery. Organ procurement surgical procedures can present to the operating room ad hoc and can catch a nurse who may not desire to participate by surprise with little opportunity to refuse as a result of staffing, skill mix or organizational work demands. This paper that stems from a larger doctoral research study exploring the experiences of perioperative nurses participating in multi-organ procurement surgery used a grounded theory method to develop a substantive theory of the nurses' experiences...
December 21, 2016: Nursing Inquiry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27934573/conscientious-non-objection-in-intensive-care
#5
Dominic Wilkinson
Discussions of conscientious objection (CO) in healthcare often concentrate on objections to interventions that relate to reproduction, such as termination of pregnancy or contraception. Nevertheless, questions of conscience can arise in other areas of medicine. For example, the intensive care unit is a locus of ethically complex and contested decisions. Ethical debate about CO usually concentrates on the issue of whether physicians should be permitted to object to particular courses of treatment; whether CO should be accommodated...
January 2017: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27934571/the-cost-of-conscience
#6
Jeanette Kennett
The spread of demands by physicians and allied health professionals for accommodation of their private ethical, usually religiously based, objections to providing care of a particular type, or to a particular class of persons, suggests the need for a re-evaluation of conscientious objection in healthcare and how it should be regulated. I argue on Kantian grounds that respect for conscience and protection of freedom of conscience is consistent with fairly stringent limitations and regulations governing refusal of service in healthcare settings...
January 2017: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27934569/two-concepts-of-conscience-and-their-implications-for-conscience-based-refusal-in-healthcare
#7
Steve Clarke
Healthcare professionals are not currently obliged to justify conscientious objections. As a consequence, there are currently no practical limits on the scope of conscience-based refusals in healthcare. Recently, a number of bioethicists, including Christopher Meyers, Robert D. Woods, Robert Card, Lori Kantymir, and Carolyn McLeod, have raised concerns about this situation and have offered proposals to place principled limits on the scope of conscience-based refusals in healthcare. Here, I seek to adjudicate among their proposals...
January 2017: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27934565/conscientious-objection-and-effective-referral
#8
Roger Trigg
Complicity in an immoral, and even criminal, activity, such as robbery or murder, is itself regarded as involving responsibility for those acts. What should the position be of health professionals who are expected to participate in actions that they believe are morally wrong? Professional responsibilities may clash with private conscience. Even referring a patient to someone else, when what is in question may be assisted suicide, or euthanasia, seems to involve some complicity. This is a live issue in Canada, but similar dilemmas occur elsewhere...
January 2017: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27733437/rationing-conscience
#9
Dominic Wilkinson
Decisions about allocation of limited healthcare resources are frequently controversial. These decisions are usually based on careful analysis of medical, scientific and health economic evidence. Yet, decisions are also necessarily based on value judgements. There may be differing views among health professionals about how to allocate resources or how to evaluate existing evidence. In specific cases, professionals may have strong personal views (contrary to professional or societal norms) that treatment should or should not be provided...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Medical Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27697790/further-clarity-on-cooperation-and-morality
#10
David S Oderberg
I explore the increasingly important issue of cooperation in immoral actions, particularly in connection with healthcare. Conscientious objection, especially as pertains to religious freedom in healthcare, has become a pressing issue in the light of the US Supreme Court judgement in Hobby Lobby Section 'Moral evaluation using the basic principles of cooperation' outlines a theory of cooperation inspired by Catholic moral theologians such as those cited by the court. The theory has independent plausibility and is at least worthy of serious consideration-in part because it is an instance of double-effect reasoning, which is also independently plausible despite its association with moral theology...
October 3, 2016: Journal of Medical Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27681301/selling-conscience-short-a-response-to-schuklenk-and-smalling-on-conscientious-objections-by-medical-professionals
#11
Jocelyn Maclure, Isabelle Dumont
In a thought-provoking paper, Schuklenk and Smalling argue that no right to conscientious objection should be granted to medical professionals. First, they hold that it is impossible to assess either the truth of conscience-based claims or the sincerity of the objectors. Second, even a fettered right to conscientious refusal inevitably has adverse effects on the rights of patients. We argue that the main problem with their position is that it is not derived from a broader reflection on the meaning and implications of freedom of conscience and reasonable accommodation...
September 28, 2016: Journal of Medical Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27618556/conscientious-objection-to-abortion-provision-why-context-matters
#12
Laura Florence Harris, Jodi Halpern, Ndola Prata, Wendy Chavkin, Caitlin Gerdts
Conscientious objection to abortion - a clinician's refusal to perform abortions because of moral or religious beliefs - is a limited right, intended to protect clinicians' convictions while maintaining abortion access. This paper argues that conscientious objection policies and debates around the world generally do not take into account the social, political, and economic pressures that profoundly influence clinicians who must decide whether to claim objector status. Lack of clarity about abortion policies, high workload, low pay, and stigma towards abortion providers can discourage abortion provision...
September 12, 2016: Global Public Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27613799/two-conceptions-of-conscience-and-the-problem-of-conscientious-objection
#13
Xavier Symons
Schuklenk and Smalling argue that it is practically impossible for civic institutions to meet the conditions necessary to ensure that conscientious objection does not conflict with the core principles of liberal democracies. In this response, I propose an alternative definition of conscience to that offered by Schuklenk and Smalling. I discuss what I call the 'traditional' notion of conscience, and contrast this with the existentialist conception of conscience (which I take to be a close cousin of the view targeted by Schuklenk and Smalling)...
September 9, 2016: Journal of Medical Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27601600/response-to-why-medical-professionals-have-no-moral-claim-to-conscientious-objection-accommodation-in-liberal-democracies-by-schuklenk-and-smalling
#14
Shimon M Glick, Alan Jotkowitz
The recent essay by Schuklenk and Smalling opposing respect for physicians' conscientious objections to providing patients with medical services that are legally permitted in liberal democracies is based on several erroneous assumptions. Acting in this manner would have serious harmful effects on the ethos of medicine and of bioethics. A much more nuanced and balanced position is critical in order to respect physicians' conscience with minimal damage to patients' rights.
September 6, 2016: Journal of Medical Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27544140/individualised-claims-of-conscience-clinical-judgement-and-best-interests
#15
Stephen W Smith
Conscience and conscientious objections are important issues in medical law and ethics. However, discussions tend to focus on a particular type of conscience-based claim. These types of claims are based upon predictable, generalizable rules in which an individual practitioner objects to what is otherwise standard medical treatment (for example, the objections recognised in the Abortion Act). However, not all conscience based claims are of this type. There are other claims which are based not on an objection to a treatment in general but in individual cases...
August 20, 2016: Health Care Analysis: HCA: Journal of Health Philosophy and Policy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27532896/transplant-medicine-in-china-need-for-transparency-and-international-scrutiny-remains
#16
T Trey, A Sharif, A Schwarz, M Fiatarone Singh, J Lavee
Previous publications have described unethical organ procurement procedures in the People's Republic of China. International awareness and condemnation contributed to the announcement abolishing the procurement of organs from executed prisoners starting from January 2015. Eighteen months after the announcement, and aligned with the upcoming International Congress of the Transplantation Society in Hong Kong, this paper revisits the topic and discusses whether the declared reform has indeed been implemented. China has neither addressed nor included in the reform a pledge to end the procurement of organs from prisoners of conscience, nor has the government initiated any legislative amendments...
November 2016: American Journal of Transplantation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27263264/mandating-disclosure-of-conscience-based-limitations-on-medical-practice
#17
Nadia N Sawicki
Stakeholders in law, medicine, and religion are unable to reach consensus about how best to address conflicts between healthcare providers' conscientious objections to treatment and patients' rights to access medical care. Conscience laws that protect objecting providers and institutions from liability are criticized as too broad by patient advocates and as too narrow by defenders of religious freedom. This Article posits that some of the tension between these stakeholders could be mitigated by statutory recognition of a duty on the part of healthcare institutions or providers to disclose conscientiously motivated limitations on practice...
2016: American Journal of Law & Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27120283/when-policy-produces-moral-distress-reclaiming-conscience
#18
COMMENT
Nancy Berlinger
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2016: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27120281/reframing-conscientious-care-providing-abortion-care-when-law-and-conscience-collide
#19
Mara Buchbinder, Dragana Lassiter, Rebecca Mercier, Amy Bryant, Anne Drapkin Lyerly
Much of the debate on conscience has addressed the ethics of refusal: the rights of providers to refuse to perform procedures to which they object and the interests of the patients who might be harmed by their refusals. But conscience can also be a positive force, grounding decision about offering care.
March 2016: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26923838/the-challenges-of-conscientious-objection-in-health-care
#20
Hasan Shanawani
Conscientious objection (CO) is the refusal to perform a legal role or responsibility because of personal beliefs. In health care, conscientious objection involves practitioners not providing certain treatments to their patients, based on reasons of morality or "conscience." The development of conscientious objection among providers is complex and challenging. While there may exist good reasons to accommodate COs of clinical providers, the exercise of rights and beliefs of the provider has an impact on a patient's health and/ or their access to care...
April 2016: Journal of Religion and Health
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