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Objection of conscience

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29703258/conscientious-objection-to-participation-in-abortion-by-midwives-and-nurses-a-systematic-review-of-reasons
#1
Valerie Fleming, Lucy Frith, Ans Luyben, Beate Ramsayer
BACKGROUND: Freedom of conscience is a core element of human rights respected by most European countries. It allows abortion through the inclusion of a conscience clause, which permits opting out of providing such services. However, the grounds for invoking conscientious objection lack clarity. Our aim in this paper is to take a step in this direction by carrying out a systematic review of reasons by midwives and nurses for declining, on conscience grounds, to participate in abortion...
April 27, 2018: BMC Medical Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29614913/conscientious-objection-and-nurses-results-of-an-interpretive-phenomenological-study
#2
Christina Lamb, Yolanda Babenko-Mould, Marilyn Evans, Carol A Wong, Ken W Kirkwood
BACKGROUND: While conscientious objection is a well-known phenomenon in normative and bioethical literature, there is a lack of evidence to support an understanding of what it is like for nurses to make a conscientious objection in clinical practice including the meaning this holds for them and the nursing profession. RESEARCH QUESTION: The question guiding this research was: what is the lived experience of conscientious objection for Registered Nurses in Ontario? RESEARCH DESIGN: Interpretive phenomenological methodology was used to gain an in-depth understanding of what it means to be a nurse making a conscientious objection...
January 1, 2018: Nursing Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29608648/conscientious-objection-in-medicine-accommodation-versus-professionalism-and-the-public-good
#3
Udo Schuklenk
Introduction: In recent years questions have arisen about the moral justification for the accommodation of health care professionals who refuse, on conscience grounds as opposed to professional grounds, to provide particular professional services to eligible patients who request that kind of service. Source of data: Literature review. Areas of disagreement: Central to concerns about the accommodation claims of conscientious objectors is that health care professionals volunteer to join their professions that typically they are the monopoly providers of such services and that a health care professional's refusal to provide professional services on grounds that are not professional judgements amounts to unprofessional conduct...
March 28, 2018: British Medical Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29577583/conscientious-objection-in-reproductive-health-ancient-prerogative-or-harmful-practice
#4
John M Thorp
As the ethics of Medicine arose from philosophical seeds of thought around 500 BC, the Oath of Hippocrates called upon individual physician conscience to place patient well-being first and "do no harm". In the centuries since, this profound statement of ethics has been embraced and molded by Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, and Christianity. It remains pertinent to the vastly different and effective medical practice of the modern world such that many medical schools around the world still incorporate it into the graduation of future physicians...
March 26, 2018: BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29568559/unconscionable-how-the-u-s-supreme-court-s-jurisprudence-lags-behind-the-world-when-it-comes-to-contraception-and-conscience
#5
Aram A Schvey, Claire Kim
U.S. Supreme Court jurisprudence undermines access to contraception by permitting individuals, institutions, and even corporations to claim religious objections to ensuring contraceptive insurance coverage, thus imposing those beliefs on non-adherents and jeopardizing their access to essential reproductive-health services. This jurisprudence is not only harmful but also runs contrary to the laws and policies of peer nations, as well as international human rights principles, which are more protective of the rights of health-care recipients to make their own decisions about contraception free from interference...
2018: Contraception and Reproductive Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29440799/is-every-life-worth-saving-does-religion-and-religious-beliefs-influence-paramedic-s-end-of-life-decision-making-a-prospective-questionnaire-based-investigation
#6
Alexander Leibold, Christoph L Lassen, Nicole Lindenberg, Bernhard M Graf, Christoph Hr Wiese
Background: Paramedics, arriving on emergency cases first, have to make end-of-life decisions almost on a daily basis. Faith shapes attitudes toward the meaning and worth of life itself and therefore influences decision-making. Objective: The objective of this study was to detect whether or not religious and spiritual beliefs influence paramedics in their workday life concerning end-of-life decisions, and whether it is legally possible for them to act according to their conscience...
January 2018: Indian Journal of Palliative Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29374872/-force-feeding-or-life-saving-dealing-with-hunger-strikes-in-israel
#7
Gil Siegal, Shimon Glick, Irit Offer-Stark, Avraham Steinberg
Force feeding of fasting hunger-striking prisoners is the subject of considerable controversy in Israel and elsewhere, posing a direct conflict between two basic ethical values: that of human life and respect for autonomy. The Israel Medical Association, as well as the World Medical Association, has taken the position that force feeding of such prisoners is an act of torture and is therefore unethical. However this paper presents an opposing view, which recently became the law in Israel, that, whereas the rights of prisoners to decree a hunger strike as a form of protest should be respected, if the prolongation of the strike reaches a stage of clear and present danger to the life and health of a prisoner, the saving of the prisoner's life must take precedence over considerations of autonomy...
January 2018: Harefuah
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29027769/moral-exemptions-and-accommodations-for-coverage-of-certain-preventive-services-under-the-affordable-care-act-interim-final-rules-with-request-for-comments
#8
(no author information available yet)
The United States has a long history of providing conscience protections in the regulation of health care for entities and individuals with objections based on religious beliefs or moral convictions. These interim final rules expand exemptions to protect moral convictions for certain entities and individuals whose health plans are subject to a mandate of contraceptive coverage through guidance issued pursuant to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. These rules do not alter the discretion of the Health Resources and Services Administration, a component of the United States Department of Health and Human Services, to maintain the guidelines requiring contraceptive coverage where no regulatorily recognized objection exists...
October 13, 2017: Federal Register
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29027768/religious-exemptions-and-accommodations-for-coverage-of-certain-preventive-services-under-the-affordable-care-act-interim-final-rules-with-request-for-comments
#9
(no author information available yet)
The United States has a long history of providing conscience protections in the regulation of health care for entities and individuals with objections based on religious beliefs and moral convictions. These interim final rules expand exemptions to protect religious beliefs for certain entities and individuals whose health plans are subject to a mandate of contraceptive coverage through guidance issued pursuant to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. These rules do not alter the discretion of the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), a component of the United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), to maintain the guidelines requiring contraceptive coverage where no regulatorily recognized objection exists...
October 13, 2017: Federal Register
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28756398/freedom-of-conscience-in-europe-an-analysis-of-three-cases-of-midwives-with-conscientious-objection-to-abortion
#10
Valerie Fleming, Beate Ramsayer, Teja Škodič Zakšek
While abortion has been legal in most developed countries for many years, the topic remains controversial. A major area of controversy concerns women's rights vis-a-vis the rights of health professionals to opt out of providing the service on conscience grounds. Although scholars from various disciplines have addressed this issue in the literature, there is a lack of empirical research on the topic. This paper provides a documentary analysis of three examples of conscientious objection on religious grounds to performing abortion-related care by midwives in different Member States of the European Union, two of which have resulted in legal action...
February 2018: Journal of Medical Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28585456/potential-conflicts-in-midwifery-practice-regarding-conscientious-objection-to-abortions-in-scotland
#11
Valerie Fleming, Yvonne Robb
BACKGROUND: This study was developed as a result of a court case involving conflicts between midwives' professional practice and their faith when caring for women undergoing abortions in Scotland. RESEARCH QUESTIONS: What are practising Roman Catholics' perspectives of potential conflicts between midwives' professional practice in Scotland with regard to involvement in abortions and their faith? How relevant is the 'conscience clause' to midwifery practice today? and What are participants' understandings of Canon 1398 in relation to midwifery practice? RESEARCH DESIGN: The theoretical underpinning of this study was Gadamer's hermeneutic out of which the method developed by Fleming et al...
January 1, 2017: Nursing Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28438784/professional-and-conscience-based-refusals-the-case-of-the-psychiatrist-s-harmful-prescription
#12
Morten Magelssen
By way of a case story, two common presuppositions in the academic debate on conscientious objection in healthcare are challenged. First, the debate typically presupposes a sharp division between conscience-based refusals based on personal core moral beliefs and refusals based on professional (eg, medical) reasons. Only the former might involve the moral gravity to warrant accommodation. The case story challenges this division, and it is argued that just as much might sometimes be at stake morally in refusals based on professional reasons...
April 24, 2017: Journal of Medical Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28436924/harnessing-the-promise-of-moral-distress-a-call-for-re-orientation
#13
Alisa Carse, Cynda Hylton Rushton
Despite over three decades of research into the sources and costs of what has become an "epidemic" of moral distress among healthcare professionals, spanning many clinical disciplines and roles, there has been little significant progress in effectively addressing moral distress. We believe the persistent sense of frustration, helplessness, and despair still dominating the clinical moral distress narrative signals a need for re-orientation in the way moral distress is understood and worked with. Most fundamentally, moral distress reveals moral investment and energy...
2017: Journal of Clinical Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28399688/conscience-conscientious-objection-and-nursing-a-concept-analysis
#14
Christina Lamb, Marilyn Evans, Yolanda Babenko-Mould, Carol A Wong, Ken W Kirkwood
BACKGROUND: Ethical nursing practice is increasingly challenging, and strategies for addressing ethical dilemmas are needed to support nurses' ethical care provision. Conscientious objection is one such strategy for addressing nurses' personal, ethical conflicts, at times associated with conscience. Exploring both conscience and conscientious objection provides understanding regarding their implications for ethical nursing practice, research, and education. Research aim: To analyze the concepts of conscience and conscientious objection in the context of nurses...
January 1, 2017: Nursing Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28380614/management-practices-associated-with-pain-in-cattle-on-western-canadian-cow-calf-operations-a-mixed-methods-study
#15
M A Moggy, E A Pajor, W E Thurston, S Parker, A M Greter, K S Schwartzkopf-Genswein, J R Campbell, M C Windeyer
The implementation of on-farm pain mitigation strategies is dependent on feasibility and importance to producers. Currently, there is a lack of information regarding adoption of management practices associated with pain in cattle within the Canadian beef industry. The objective of this mixed methods study was to describe pain-associated practices implemented on farm and producer perceptions toward pain mitigation strategies. A questionnaire about calving management and calf processing was delivered to 109 cow-calf producers in western Canada...
February 2017: Journal of Animal Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28255026/conscientious-objection-in-healthcare-and-the-duty-to-refer
#16
Christopher Cowley
Although some healthcare professionals have the legal right to conscientiously object to authorise or perform certain lawful medical services, they have an associated duty to provide the patient with enough information to seek out another professional willing to authorise or provide the service (the 'duty to refer'). Does the duty to refer morally undermine the professional's conscientious objection (CO)? I narrow my discussion to the National Health Service in Britain, and the case of a general practitioner (GP) being asked by a pregnant woman to authorise an abortion...
April 2017: Journal of Medical Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28219284/conscientious-objection-understanding-the-right-of-conscience-in-health-and-healthcare-practice
#17
Christina Lamb
In situations of moral gravitas, healthcare professionals are largely protected in the Western world to invoke their right to conscientiously object to providing care that conflicts with their personal, moral, and religious beliefs. However, making a conscientious objection needs to be predicated by an understanding of conscience, and knowledge of conscience is largely absent in definition as well as discourse surrounding conscientious objection in healthcare practice. Moreover, current definitions of health do not place emphasis on the ethical well-being of patients as well as care providers...
April 2016: New Bioethics: a Multidisciplinary Journal of Biotechnology and the Body
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28160054/a-simple-method-for-international-standardization-of-photographic-documentation-for-aesthetic-plastic-surgery
#18
Seung Chul Rhee
Due to the lack of internationally standardized, objective, and scientific photographic standardization methods, differences in photographic documents have gravely affected the truth of surgical outcomes by visual misperception or illusion, thus hindering the development of plastic surgery clinically and scholastically. Here I suggest a simple method for standardization of facial photographs. The method consists of an imaginary transverse line (tentatively the "PSA line") rather than the Frankfort horizontal plane and uses a white background with black grids and standard RGB with CMYK circles...
April 2017: Aesthetic Plastic Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28050912/conflicts-of-conscience-in-the-neonatal-intensive-care-unit
#19
Natalie J Ford, Wendy Austin
BACKGROUND: Limited knowledge of the experiences of conflicts of conscience found in nursing literature. OBJECTIVES: To explore the individual experiences of a conflict of conscience for neonatal nurses in Alberta. RESEARCH DESIGN: Interpretive description was selected to help situate the findings in a meaningful clinical context. Participants and research context: Five interviews with neonatal nurses working in Neonatal Intensive Care Units throughout Alberta...
January 1, 2017: Nursing Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28042920/being-a-close-family-member-of-a-person-with-dementia-living-in-a-nursing-home
#20
Berit Seiger Cronfalk, Britt-Marie Ternestedt, Astrid Norberg
AIM AND OBJECTIVE: To illuminate how family members of persons with dementia describe their own experiences, before and after placing their relative in a nursing home. BACKGROUND: In the Western world and with a growing population of older people, the number of persons with dementia increases. Family members often become carers in their own homes creating stressful and exhausting situation that eventually leads to relocating the person to a nursing home. This may lead to troubled conscience among family members...
November 2017: Journal of Clinical Nursing
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