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Raquel Matoso Silva, Filomena Adega, Helena J Kjöllerström, Kim Labuschagne, Antoinette Kotze, Carlos Fernandes, Raquel Chaves, Maria do Mar Oom
Genets (Genetta) are a genus of African mammalian carnivorans with 14 currently recognized species, although taxonomic uncertainties remain, particularly regarding the number of species within the large-spotted genet complex. This study presents the first banded karyotype and molecular cytogenetic analysis of a genetically identified panther genet, Genetta maculata, the most common and widespread taxon of the large-spotted genet complex, with a wide distribution in sub-Saharan Africa. Sampled in Gauteng Province, South Africa, it could be assigned to the subspecies G...
October 27, 2016: Cytogenetic and Genome Research
Cory A Rubel, San-Pin Wu, Lin Lin, Tianyuan Wang, Rainer B Lanz, Xilong Li, Ramakrishna Kommagani, Heather L Franco, Sally A Camper, Qiang Tong, Jae-Wook Jeong, John P Lydon, Francesco J DeMayo
Altered progesterone responsiveness leads to female infertility and cancer, but underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Mice with uterine-specific ablation of GATA binding protein 2 (Gata2) are infertile, showing failures in embryo implantation, endometrial decidualization, and uninhibited estrogen signaling. Gata2 deficiency results in reduced progesterone receptor (PGR) expression and attenuated progesterone signaling, as evidenced by genome-wide expression profiling and chromatin immunoprecipitation. GATA2 not only occupies at and promotes expression of the Pgr gene but also regulates downstream progesterone responsive genes in conjunction with the PGR...
October 25, 2016: Cell Reports
James M Holaska
The nucleus is separated from the cytosol by the nuclear envelope, which is a double lipid bilayer composed of the outer nuclear membrane and the inner nuclear membrane. The intermediate filament proteins lamin A, lamin B, and lamin C form a network underlying the inner nuclear membrane. This proteinaceous network provides the nucleus with its strength, rigidity, and elasticity. Positioned within the inner nuclear membrane are more than 150 inner nuclear membrane proteins, many of which interact directly with lamins and require lamins for their inner nuclear membrane localization...
September 15, 2016: Comprehensive Physiology
Antonia Lanni, Maria Moreno, Fernando Goglia
The hypermetabolic effects of thyroid hormones (THs), the major endocrine regulators of metabolic rate, are widely recognized. Although, the cellular mechanisms underlying these effects have been extensively investigated, much has yet to be learned about how TH regulates diverse cellular functions. THs have a profound impact on mitochondria, the organelles responsible for the majority of cellular energy production, and several studies have been devoted to understand the respective importance of the nuclear and mitochondrial pathways for organelle activity...
September 15, 2016: Comprehensive Physiology
Chwan Hong Foo, Christina L Rootes, Karla Cowley, Glenn A Marsh, Cathryn M Gould, Celine Deffrasnes, Christopher J Cowled, Reuben Klein, Sarah J Riddell, Deborah Middleton, Kaylene J Simpson, Lin-Fa Wang, Andrew G D Bean, Cameron R Stewart
Hendra and Nipah viruses (family Paramyxoviridae, genus Henipavirus) are bat-borne viruses that cause fatal disease in humans and a range of other mammalian species. Gaining a deeper understanding of host pathways exploited by henipaviruses for infection may identify targets for new anti-viral therapies. Here we have performed genome-wide high-throughput agonist and antagonist screens at biosafety level 4 to identify host-encoded microRNAs (miRNAs) impacting henipavirus infection in human cells. Members of the miR-181 and miR-17~93 families strongly promoted Hendra virus infection...
October 2016: PLoS Pathogens
Ljerka Lah, Daronja Trense, Harald Benke, Per Berggren, Þorvaldur Gunnlaugsson, Christina Lockyer, Ayaka Öztürk, Bayram Öztürk, Iwona Pawliczka, Anna Roos, Ursula Siebert, Krzysztof Skóra, Gísli Víkingsson, Ralph Tiedemann
The population structure of the highly mobile marine mammal, the harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena), in the Atlantic shelf waters follows a pattern of significant isolation-by-distance. The population structure of harbor porpoises from the Baltic Sea, which is connected with the North Sea through a series of basins separated by shallow underwater ridges, however, is more complex. Here, we investigated the population differentiation of harbor porpoises in European Seas with a special focus on the Baltic Sea and adjacent waters, using a population genomics approach...
2016: PloS One
Amornpan Klanchui, Nachon Raethong, Peerada Prommeenate, Wanwipa Vongsangnak, Asawin Meechai
Cyanobacteria, the phototrophic microorganisms, have attracted much attention recently as a promising source for environmentally sustainable biofuels production. However, barriers for commercial markets of cyanobacteria-based biofuels concern the economic feasibility. Miscellaneous strategies for improving the production performance of cyanobacteria have thus been developed. Among these, the simple ad hoc strategies resulting in failure to optimize fully cell growth coupled with desired product yield are explored...
October 26, 2016: Advances in Biochemical Engineering/biotechnology
Feng Q He, Markus Ollert
Identification of key genes for a given physiological or pathological process is an essential but still very challenging task for the entire biomedical research community. Statistics-based approaches, such as genome-wide association study (GWAS)- or quantitative trait locus (QTL)-related analysis have already made enormous contributions to identifying key genes associated with a given disease or phenotype, the success of which is however very much dependent on a huge number of samples. Recent advances in network biology, especially network inference directly from genome-scale data and the following-up network analysis, opens up new avenues to predict key genes driving a given biological process or cellular function...
October 26, 2016: Advances in Biochemical Engineering/biotechnology
Mansoureh Tajaddod, Andrea Tanzer, Konstantin Licht, Michael T Wolfinger, Stefan Badelt, Florian Huber, Oliver Pusch, Sandy Schopoff, Michael Janisiw, Ivo Hofacker, Michael F Jantsch
BACKGROUND: Short interspersed elements (SINEs) represent the most abundant group of non-long-terminal repeat transposable elements in mammalian genomes. In primates, Alu elements are the most prominent and homogenous representatives of SINEs. Due to their frequent insertion within or close to coding regions, SINEs have been suggested to play a crucial role during genome evolution. Moreover, Alu elements within mRNAs have also been reported to control gene expression at different levels...
October 25, 2016: Genome Biology
Jilly Naaijen, Saskia de Ruiter, Marcel P Zwiers, Jeffrey C Glennon, Sarah Durston, David J Lythgoe, Steven C R Williams, Tobias Banaschewski, Daniel Brandeis, Barbara Franke, Jan K Buitelaar
BACKGROUND: Compulsivity, the closely linked trait impulsivity and addictive behaviour are associated with several neurodevelopmental disorders, including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). All three disorders show impaired fronto-striatal functioning, which may be related to altered glutamatergic signalling. Genetic factors are also thought to play an important role in the aetiology of compulsivity-related disorders...
October 26, 2016: BMC Psychiatry
Ved Prakash Kumar, Anupam Shrivastwa, Parag Nigam, Dhyanendra Kumar, Surendra Prakash Goyal
Swamp deer (Rucervus duvaucelii) is an endemic, Scheduled I species under the Wildlife (Protection) Act 1972, India. According to variations in antler size, it has been classified into three subspecies, namely Western (R. duvaucelii duvaucelii), Central (R. duvaucelii branderi), and Eastern (R. duvaucelii ranjitsinhii). For planning effective ex situ and in situ conservation of a wide-ranging species in different bioclimatic regions and in wildlife forensic, the use of genetic characterization in defining morpho/ecotypes has been suggested because of the geographic clines and reproductive isolation...
October 26, 2016: Mitochondrial DNA. Part A. DNA Mapping, Sequencing, and Analysis
Zi Yi Wan, Jun Hong Xia, Grace Lin, Le Wang, Valerie C L Lin, Gen Hua Yue
Sexual dimorphism is an interesting biological phenomenon. Previous studies showed that DNA methylation might play a role in sexual dimorphism. However, the overall picture of the genome-wide methylation landscape in sexually dimorphic species remains unclear. We analyzed the DNA methylation landscape and transcriptome in hybrid tilapia (Oreochromis spp.) using whole genome bisulfite sequencing (WGBS) and RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq). We found 4,757 sexually dimorphic differentially methylated regions (DMRs), with significant clusters of DMRs located on chromosomal regions associated with sex determination...
October 26, 2016: Scientific Reports
Sajith Nair, Pradeep Bist, Neha Dikshit, Manoj N Krishnan
Type I interferon (IFN-I) mediated innate immune response controls virus infections by inducing the expression of interferon stimulated genes (ISGs). Although ubiquitination plays key roles in immune signaling regulation, a human genome-wide understanding of the role of E3 ubiquitin ligases in interferon mediated ISG induction is lacking. Here, we report a genome-wide profiling of the effect of ectopic expression of 521 E3 ubiquitin ligases and substrate recognition subunits encoded in the human genome (which constitutes 84...
October 26, 2016: Scientific Reports
Jonathan B Puritz, John R Gold, David S Portnoy
Conservation and management of exploited species depends on accurate knowledge of how genetic variation is partitioned across a fishery, especially as it relates to recruitment. Using double-digest restriction-site associated DNA sequencing, we surveyed variation in 7,382 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) young-of-the-year (YOY) sampled at six localities and in adults sampled at two localities in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Significant genetic heterogeneity was detected between the two adult samples, separated by ~600 km, and at spatial scales less than five kilometers among samples of  YOY...
October 26, 2016: Scientific Reports
Christine Langlois, Arkan Abadi, Jesus Peralta-Romero, Akram Alyass, Fernando Suarez, Jaime Gomez-Zamudio, Ana I Burguete-Garcia, Fereshteh T Yazdi, Miguel Cruz, David Meyre
Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with fasting plasma glucose (FPG) in adult European populations. The contribution of these SNPs to FPG in non-Europeans and children is unclear. We studied the association of 15 GWAS SNPs and a genotype score (GS) with FPG and 7 metabolic traits in 1,421 Mexican children and adolescents from Mexico City. Genotyping of the 15 SNPs was performed using TaqMan Open Array. We used multivariate linear regression models adjusted for age, sex, body mass index standard deviation score, and recruitment center...
October 26, 2016: Scientific Reports
Iben Daugaard, Diana Dominguez, Tina E Kjeldsen, Lasse S Kristensen, Henrik Hager, Tomasz K Wojdacz, Lise Lotte Hansen
Lung cancer is the number one cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism that regulates gene expression, and disease-specific methylation changes can be targeted as biomarkers. We have compared the genome-wide methylation pattern in tumor and tumor-adjacent normal lung tissue from four lung adenocarcinoma (LAC) patients using DNA methylation microarrays and identified 74 differentially methylated regions (DMRs). Eighteen DMRs were selected for validation in a cohort comprising primary tumors from 52 LAC patients and tumor-adjacent normal lung tissue from 32 patients by methylation-sensitive high resolution melting (MS-HRM) analysis...
October 26, 2016: Scientific Reports
Shuai Wang, James B Meigs, Josée Dupuis
In recent years, improved genotyping and sequencing technologies have enabled the discovery of new loci associated with various diseases or traits. For instance, by testing the association with each single-nucleotide variant (SNV) separately, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have achieved tremendous success in identifying SNVs associated with specific traits. However, little is known about the common genetic basis of multiple traits owing to lack of efficient methods. With the use of extended quasi-likelihood, a Wald test has been proposed to perform a bivariate analysis of a continuous and a binary trait in unrelated samples...
October 26, 2016: European Journal of Human Genetics: EJHG
Tetsuro Komatsu, Kyosuke Nagata, Harald Wodrich
In recent years, it has been suggested that host cells exert intrinsic mechanisms to control nuclear replicating DNA viruses. This cellular response involves nuclear antiviral factors targeting incoming viral genomes. Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) is the best-studied model in this context, and it was shown that upon nuclear entry HSV-1 genomes are immediately targeted by components of promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) and the nuclear DNA sensor IFI16 (interferon gamma inducible protein 16). Based on HSV-1 studies, together with limited examples in other viral systems, these phenomena are widely believed to be a common cellular response to incoming viral genomes, although formal evidence for each virus is lacking...
October 22, 2016: Viruses
Heidi Barth, Morgane Solis, Wallys Kack-Kack, Eric Soulier, Aurélie Velay, Samira Fafi-Kremer
Developments of genome amplification techniques have rapidly expanded the family of human polyomaviruses (PyV). Following infection early in life, PyV persist in their hosts and are generally of no clinical consequence. High-level replication of PyV can occur in patients under immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory therapy and causes severe clinical entities, such as progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, polyomavirus-associated nephropathy or Merkel cell carcinoma. The characterization of known and newly-discovered human PyV, their relationship to human health, and the mechanisms underlying pathogenesis remain to be elucidated...
October 22, 2016: Viruses
Jill A McKay, Long Xie, Michiel Adriaens, Chris T Evelo, Dianne Ford, John C Mathers
Growing evidence supports the hypothesis that the in utero environment can have profound implications for fetal development and later life offspring health. Current theory suggests conditions experienced in utero prepare, or "programme", the fetus for its anticipated post-natal environment. The mechanisms responsible for these programming events are poorly understood but are likely to involve gene expression changes. Folate is essential for normal fetal development and inadequate maternal folate supply during pregnancy has long term adverse effects for offspring...
October 22, 2016: Nutrients
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